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This is an archived copy of the 2012-13 Catalog. To access the most recent version of the bulletin, please visit .

Graduate Programs in Business

Admission

Application for admission to the Master of Business Administration program at Husson should be made to:

The School of Graduate Studies

Husson University
One College Circle
Bangor, Maine 04401
1-800-4-HUSSON

To be admitted, an applicant must have received a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and possess a demonstrable ability and motivation to pursue graduate-level work. Evidence of such may include, but not be limited to:

  • A personal interview with the Director of the Master of Business Administration Program 
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Previous college or university work
  • Score on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT)
  • Previous work experience

An application is not considered complete until the following are received:

  • An application with the $40 application fee
  • Official transcripts from each college or university attended
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) results. (Academic Leveling Course (ALC) scores or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores may be submitted in lieu of the GMAT.)
  • Immunization Records
  • Statement of Purpose essay

Status

An applicant’s admission status is one of the following:

Regular: Students whose applications are complete and who are accepted by the Graduate Admissions Committee without condition are admitted as regular graduate students.

Conditional: In reviewing a candidate’s application, the Graduate Admissions Committee may recommend that a student be accepted on a conditional basis.  This status is assigned to those students who are taking graduate courses, but whose applications are not yet complete. Students who are awaiting the GMAT could be enrolled in this category. The letter of acceptance will contain the conditions that must be met before the student can be reclassified for regular status.  No more than 6 credit hours in conditional status may be applied toward the master's degree.

Non-degree: This status is assigned to those students who are taking graduate courses, but who have not yet applied to the Master of Business Administration Program.  Admission as a non-degree student does not necessarily mean that the student will be accepted as a regular student when and if application is made for such status. No more than 6 credit hours in non-degree status may be applied toward the master’s degree. Admission to non-degree status requires the submission of official undergraduate transcripts.

Academic Standards

Students must maintain a “B” average (3.0) in order to continue in a graduate program. A student whose average falls below 3.0, who earns a grade lower than a “C,” or who earns more than two grades of “C” or “C+,” will be reviewed by the Graduate Academic Program Committee, which may dismiss the student or determine the conditions under which the student may continue in the program. No more than six credits of course work in the “C” range can be applied toward the master’s degree. A student who has not attained a grade point average of 3.0 or better at the end of his or her program of study will not graduate.

Transfer Credit

Normally six credits of appropriate graduate-level course work, earned within five years of entry into the Husson program, may be transferred from an accredited institution, if the grades earned in such course work are “B” or better.

In special circumstances, an individual who has begun a graduate management program at another accredited institution may transfer up to nine credits from the program, if those credits have been earned within five years of the date of entry to the Husson program. Likewise, an individual who relocates out of the area may, with prior approval of the Dean, transfer back to the Husson program up to nine credits of graduate-level course work from an accredited institution in order to complete the requirements for the Master in Business Administration degree. Only credits earned in course work completed with a grade of “B” or better will be eligible for transfer.

International Students

The international applicant is expected to submit the same credentials as other students, including transcripts of courses taken and examination results. If the documents are not in English, they must be accompanied by an English translation certified by the same issuing authority or by a reputable translation service.

Applicants whose native language is not English must demonstrate proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and understanding English. Successful completion of a minimum of four undergraduate courses at Husson University or another accredited U.S. College or university is required. Two of the courses must be in English, technical writing, or a related area. The remaining two courses must be in business or a related field. A grade of “C” or higher must be earned in each composition course and a grade of “B” or higher in each business course.

Courses

BA 101. Introduction to Business. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the general nature of functional areas in business such as marketing, management, accounting, finance, research and development, and risk management. The relationship between business, the government, the economy, and the environment is examined.

BA 111. Economic Geography. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the principles of economic geography, ranging from physical and biological geography to cultural and political factors. The decision making processes, both local and global, for different types of service oriented, manufacturing, transportation, and resource based businesses will be examined. The relationship of natural resources, population, and culture, and how such factors affect economic activity will be emphasized.

BA 201. Business Law I. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with a basic knowledge of the law of contracts, personal property and real property.

BA 202. Business Law II. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to augment BA 201 with in depth analysis of the law in Contracts, UCC, Corporations, Principal Agency Law, Advanced Tort Law, Environmental Law, Real Property Law, Securities Law and Employment Law.

BA 204. Franchise Formation and Management. 3 Hours.

This class will discuss franchise formation and management with particular emphasis on the discovery and evaluation of the franchisor and the feasibility of entrepreneurs converting an existing business into a franchise chain or creating and selling new franchises, domestic and international. Franchise accounting and finance (borrowing or leveraging) will be covered, as well as, taking the franchise to the stock market or going public (IPO) and raising investment capital. Prerequisite(s): EC 321.

BA 205. Real Estate Law. 3 Hours.

This course presents a systematic study of the basic principles of real property law through explanation, discussion and problem-solving techniques. The course provides a decision-oriented approach to legal concepts, featuring student completion of a complete abstract of title at the Penobscot County Registry of Deeds; real estate forms; and comprehension of relevant Maine statutes.

BA 220. Real Estate Principles and Practices. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with methods of analyzing acquisition and retention of Real Estate. Also, there will be a focus on the skills and techniques required to operate a real estate business, including trust accounts, risk management, and property management.

BA 224. Public Relations. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to concepts and fundamental principles of public relations. Public Relations focus on the practical application of these concepts and principles through class presentation. This course is designed around the various ways an organization communicates with its publics, the types of communication used, the creating of and various strategies available to effectively communicate organizational messages. Prerequisite(s): EH 123 and EH 124.

BA 271. Risk Management. 3 Hours.

A study is made of the risks encountered by individuals and business firms. A presentation is made of the basic principles and institutions, which have been developed in risk management. This material is treated primarily from the consumer point of view.

BA 299. Topic/. 1 Hour.

This is a course of variable content. Faculty and students prepare a special topic of timely interest in the business area. This course may consist of seminars, lectures, individualized instruction and/or research related to a specific area of specialization.

BA 302. Business Ethics. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to raise a moral consciousness and sensitivity within the various disciplines of the business curriculum. The disciplines focused on here are business, accounting, marketing, multinational corporations, and those areas of human resource management inclusive of diversity in the workplace within the context of environmental and social responsibility.

BA 306. Franchise Law. 3 Hours.

This is a law class that analyzes all the issues of Franchise Law with a particular emphasis on Contracts, Principal/Agent Franchise Relations, Corporate Formation of Franchises, and Securities Law. Prerequisite(s): BA 201 and BA 202.

BA 310. Organization and Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on how to design organization systems and effectively manage them. Students completing the course should understand the universal process of management and key terminology in the language of management. Students are encouraged conceptually to blend contributions from the various schools of management thought into an integrated perspective of what managers do and why.

BA 311. Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

This course addresses traditional personnel administration issues. Emphasis in the course is on how to manage the major human resource administration functions of job design, reward system design, staffing, training and performance control, to achieve maximum employee performance and satisfaction. Prerequisite(s): BA 310 or ( Major=BS Criminal Justice or Major=AS Criminal Justice or Major=AS Paralegal or Major=BS Paralegal or Major=BS English - Prelaw).

BA 321. Marketing. 3 Hours.

The components of the marketing structure are covered, together with the development of the modern concepts of marketing. Among the topics included are: the legal environment, channels of distribution, segmentation, the international market, consumer behavior, retailing and advertising.

BA 334. International Economics. 3 Hours.

This applied economics course will emphasize the use of cases to study topics such as comparative advantage, treaties, tariffs, non-tariff trade barriers, and trade blocks among developed and developing nations. Prerequisite(s): EC 201 and EC 202.

BA 344. Personal Financial Planning. 3 Hours.

This course provides comprehensive coverage of personal financial planning in the areas of money management, axes, consumer credit, housing and other consumer decisions, legal protection, insurance, retirement planning, and estate planning. Prerequisite(s): MS 141 or MS 111 or MS 242.

BA 351. Internship. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 352. Internship II. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 353. Internship III. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 354. Internship IV. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 355. Internship IV. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director. Prerequisite(s): BA 351 and BA 352 and BA 353 and BA 354.

BA 362. Financial Management I. 3 Hours.

The foundation finance course covers basic personal and corporate financial management issues. Topics include personal financial planning, financial statements, financial ratio analysis, capital budgeting, financial forecasting, and cash inventory and receivables management. Students are expected to become proficient in financial analysis of a corporation and in various aspects of corporate financial management. Prerequisite(s): AC 121 and (AC 122 or AC 211) and EC 201 and (MS 141 or MS 111 or MS 242).

BA 364. Financial Management II. 3 Hours.

The course is a continuation of Financial Management I and will cover such topics as real options, sensitivity, scenario and break-even analysis, basic issues regarding stocks and bonds, risk/return and cost of capital, capital structure and limits to the use of debt. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 375. Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides the basic concepts of logistics and supply chain management. The student will study logistical problems and appropriate strategie to solve these problems in the major areas of transportation, inventory, location, logistics control and global logistics planning. This course will represent the basic marketing areas: distribution, product, price and promotion.

BA 411. Organizational Behavior. 3 Hours.

This course is highly experiential in its approach to helping students understand and appreciate why people behave the way they do in an organizational context. Students learn how to manage employee behavior by analysis of real world phenomena and by application of principles in the areas of human perception and communication, leadership and motivation, small group dynamics, organizational culture, and organizational change. Prerequisite(s): BA 310.

BA 413. Operations Management. 3 Hours.

Quantitative model building and manipulation are a means of analyzing and synthesizing the elements of productions management. Both deterministic and stochastic modeling are emphasized in the areas of work systems design, queuing, PERT, SQC, inventory control, forecasting, and linear and nonlinear programming. Prerequisite(s): BA 310 and MS 132.

BA 414. Business Strategy. 3 Hours.

This Business Administration senior seminar focuses on decision making at the executive management level, the formulation of strategy, and its implementation in the organization. The course will employ case studies, laboratory simulation techniques, and computer spreadsheet analysis. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior.

BA 421. Advertising. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the field of advertising: Students plan campaigns, write copy and design layouts for the print and electronic media, and summarize their knowledge by submitting a complete advertising plan at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): BA 321.

BA 422. Sales and Sales Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with the fundamentals of good salesmanship and sales management. Prior to studying management principles students practice sales techniques in simulations. Cases are used to illustrate and evaluate principles of sales management. Prerequisite(s): BA 321.

BA 423. Retail Management. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamentals of successful retail operations. Topics included are the market concept in retailing, factors of area and market analysis, and aspects of organizational structure, layout, and personnel planning. Also covered are methods of pricing, merchandising planning, inventory, expense control and sales promotion techniques. Prerequisite(s): BA 321.

BA 424. Marketing Research. 3 Hours.

The basic research concepts and practices as applied to the analysis of marketing problems are examined. Topics include sources of data, collecting data, sampling, questionnaire construction, tabulating data, and report preparation; computerized statistical software is used. Prerequisite(s): BA 321 and MS 132.

BA 425. Marketing Management. 3 Hours.

This is the capstone course for marketing majors. Students apply concepts learned in other courses to marketing problems of business and nonprofit organizations. Cases and business simulations are used to teach decision-making in the complex environment of business. A complete marketing plan for a simulated company of the student’s choice summarizes the student’s knowledge of the field. Prerequisite(s): BA 321.

BA 426. Real Estate Market, Research and Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course will discuss market research, real estate sales, property valuations and analysis. Students will examine market research reports to gain insight into product and market trends, opportunities, projections, and growth in the Maine, the US and global real estate markets. Prerequisite(s): EC 321 and MS 132 and (BA 205 or PL 201).

BA 427. Franchise Market Research and Analysis. 3 Hours.

This class will focus on analysis of market demographics, feasibility studies, product pricing, promotion and distribution, franchise broker contacts, extrapolation of sales and expenses, and the projection of costs and net profits, emerging markets and capital expansion. Prerequisite(s): EC 321 and MS 132 and MS 232 and BA 362.

BA 434. International Finance. 3 Hours.

The factors affecting exchange rates are discussed, as well as different types of exchange rate systems and how governments attempt to influence exchange rates. The relationships among interest rate parity, purchasing power parity, the Fisher effect and International Fisher effect and exchange rates are analyzed. Students learn how currency futures, currency options and money market hedges are used to hedge exchange rate risk. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 437. International Marketing. 3 Hours.

The basics of international marketing will be taught including the foundations of culture, cultural understanding, business customs and practices in global marketing, assessing global markets, and developing international marketing strategy. Prerequisite(s): BA 321.

BA 438. Export-Import Procedures. 3 Hours.

The basics of export-import procedures will be taught including justification for exporting/importing, market planning methods, selection of appropriate marketing mix variables, and regulation. Prerequisite(s): BA 321.

BA 439. International Franchising Management. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on international expansion of franchises, learning the culture, monetary exchanges, imports and exports, local international market analysis and much more. Prerequisite(s): BA 204 and BA 306 and BA 427.

BA 440. Small Business Management I. 3 Hours.

This course supplies prospective and current small business managers with the essential concepts of starting and operating small businesses. Topics covered include: environment and management of small business enterprise, problems in starting small businesses, financial and administrative control, and management of business operations. Particular emphasis is placed on the interrelated nature of the components, particularly as they affect the financial picture of the firm. Through a lecture and discussion format, students are expected to share their own experiences in small businesses with their fellow students. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior or College Level=Junior.

BA 441. Entrepreneurship I- New Venture Development. 3 Hours.

Students will be introduced to the practical application of classic and contemporary business theory as it applies to the early stages of entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship, opportunity recognition, innovation, and new venture development. Course topics include types of entrepreneurs, opportunity recognition, marketing, cash and other resource requirements, financial statements, planning, franchising, intellectual property, success/failure/resilience, and growth. Class will use text, cases, articles, internet sources, and guest lecturers. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior or College Level=Junior.

BA 442. Small Business Management II. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced course which focuses on real problems in Small Business Management, using the case approach. Cases are drawn from the text, from actual local small businesses, and from the practical experience of students in the class. Prerequisite(s): BA 440.

BA 443. Entrepreneurship II: New Venture Management. 3 Hours.

This class builds on BA 441, New Venture Development. The focus of this class is on the early stages of formalizing and growing a venture. Topics include business plan writing, fund raising and cash flow, measuring and conveying financial position, core strategy development and competitive advantage, sustainability, international entrepreneurship, supply chain, growth, and exit. Prerequisite(s): BA 101 and AC 121 and AC 122 and BA 441.

BA 460. Investments. 3 Hours.

Beginning with an introduction to financial markets and investment instruments, topics include stock and bond quotations and trading procedures, rate of return, margin trading, stock indexes, stock and bond valuation, risk and return, portfolio theory, active and passive portfolio management, and investment performance evaluation. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 464. Bank & Financial Services Management. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce students to the specific issues in the financial management of a banking firm and, to a smaller degree, of other financial intermediaries. Emphasis will be on products, roles, regulatory framework, and risk management. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 471. Life and Health Insurance. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to provide background knowledge for personal application and for those responsible for administering benefit plans for employees; it provides the necessary information required to pass the State of Maine license examination. Prerequisite(s): BA 271.

BA 472. Casualty and Property Insurance. 3 Hours.

The first part of the course introduces the basics of the entire insurance business, including a summary of legal aspects, types of insurers and principles of reinsurance; next, each type of insurance is studied in detail. Topics covered are fire, consequential loss, inland marine, ocean marine, theft and surety, liability and miscellaneous property insurance. Prerequisite(s): BA 271.

BA 473. Real Estate Appraisal. 3 Hours.

This course familiarizes the student with the foundation and principles of the appraisal process. The student will become familiar with the three approaches to value. Site valuation, construction costs, depreciation; comparables selection and adjustments; rental multipliers; and reconciliation will be discussed. The student will focus on the elements making up the standards for professional appraisal practice. These elements, i.e., Definitions, Rules, Standards and Standard Rules, Statements and advisory opinions are discussed in detail along with the philosophy and history of USPAP. Prerequisite(s): EC 321 and MS 132 and BA 362.

BA 475. E-Business and E-Commerce for Managers. 3 Hours.

This course teaches the basic e-business and e-commerce theory. The students will apply the theory through the development of a website for the prime purpose of marketing a product or service or idea online.

BA 490. International Business. 3 Hours.

This course covers the international dimensions of managerial decision-making including: world economies, international trade theories, tariffs, quotas and other trade issues, global strategic planning, cross-cultural management, international market entry, international human resource management, international organization strategy, international logistics, import/export operations, currency exchange, international financial management. Current developments in global economic and business are emphasized; students participate in a computerized simulation throughout the semester. Prerequisite(s): BA 310 and BA 321.

BA 495. Senior Management Project. 3 Hours.

An experiential course that gives seniors the opportunity to apply what they have learned in class to a real business situation. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior.

BA 498. Business Seminar. 3 Hours.

This honors course requires the study of various business problems under the supervision of members of the Department of Business Administration. A paper is required. An oral examination is scheduled as the final examination in the course. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior.

BA 499. Topic/. 1 Hour.

This is a course of variable content. Faculty and students prepare a special topic of timely interest in the business area. This course may consist of seminars, lectures, individualized instruction and/or research related to a specific area of specialization.

BA 600. Research Methods in Business and Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for beginning graduate students who have little or no formal preparation in those areas of research and problem-solving essential for a comprehensive study of business and education at the graduate level. Emphasis is placed on the identification of common problem types and the selection and use of appropriate methods of analysis (primarily statistical in nature).

BA 601. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

This course begins with a comprehensive overview of micro- and macroeconomic concepts with the aim of developing within students a picture of how business and nonprofit organizations relate to the economy as a whole. The course then focuses on practical applications of economic analysis to problems of concern to managers. Case studies and projects are used to demonstrate the methods used to determine economic feasibility and cost-effectiveness of products, services, and programs.

BA 602. Managerial Accounting. 3 Hours.

This is an accelerated accounting course for those with little or no formal accounting background. The emphasis is on concepts which managers need to know in order to be effective. Topics include the preparation and interpretation of financial statements, working capital, cost planning and control, break-even analysis, and capital budgeting.

BA 605. Management Communications. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced communications course that builds upon a student’s experience and prior undergraduate course work in writing and oral communications. Topics include: advanced business writing, use of visual materials, selection of secondary sources of information, report preparation, and presentations to small and large groups.

BA 620. Financial Management. 3 Hours.

Topics considered include financial planning, operating and capital budgets, cash flow, purchasing and accounting procedures, the sources and uses of corporate and institutional funds, and financial analysis for evaluation and control. Students develop projects specifically related to their needs in educational administration, small business, or corporate management. Prerequisite(s): BA 602 or AC 301.

BA 621. Marketing Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on complex problems facing decision-makers in the marketing of goods and services. Emphasis is placed on the decision-making process, including assessment of the social, economic, and political environment in which the organization operates; problem definition; development and evaluation of alternatives, and the implementation of the best alternative. Cases in advertising, sales, marketing research, and strategic marketing management provide practice in marketing analysis and decision-making.

BA 622. Production Management. 3 Hours.

Emphasis is placed on the use of quantitative techniques for solving manufacturing problems. The student is given an opportunity to practice mathematical model-building and manipulation. Other topics considered include queuing system design, plant layout, statistical quality control, inventory modeling, Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT), linear and nonlinear programming, and control theory.

BA 625. Global Strategic Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the strategic challenges and opportunities confronting firms that undertake to create value and to compete in the global economy. Successful companies develop strategies for doing business in emerging markets that are different from those they use at home and often find novel ways of implementing them too. The class will make extensive use of case analysis and discussion to evaluate and understand the strategic issues that confront firms operating internationally, as well as to appreciate the importance of values and ethics in organization decisions and actions. In this course we will probe the workings of business strategies in transition and emerging economies, gain an understanding of the strategies of local firms, and analyze the international success and failure of companies. Prerequisite(s): BA 600 and BA 601 and BA 602 and 9 Credits From Range [BA 605 To BA 799].

BA 626. Accounting in Planning, Budgeting and Control. 3 Hours.

This course examines the role of accounting in the planning, budgeting, and control process of a business or nonprofit organization. Various types of budgets are discussed, including line-item and program budgets. The integration of budgeting with planning and control functions is emphasized. Case studies are used to provide the opportunity to apply these tools to managerial problems. Prerequisite(s): BA 602 or AC 211.

BA 627. Investment Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course provides a detailed description of securities market organization and approaches to investment opportunities. Students will examine theories used in the valuation of financial securities and employ projects and applications to develop a real world understanding of portfolio management. Prerequisite(s): BA 602.

BA 628. New Venture Planning and Management. 3 Hours.

This course deals with the foundation of new ventures and related aspects of managing the small growing enterprise. Techniques taught in this course are equally applicable to small businesses, nonprofit organizations, and new ventures of larger organizations. Topics include: use of scarce resources, such as money, talent and technological expertise; identification of environmental threats and opportunities; and operational considerations such as organizational structure, legal requirements, financing, and accounting procedures.

BA 640. Managing Change. 3 Hours.

Managing Change focuses on the skills required to deal effectively with organizational change. The course addresses first the pressures in the business environment that make change a fundamental reality for managers. Then it examines the manager as change agent responsible for initiating innovation and explores both the personal skills required in the role of change agent and the tools and techniques available to support the manager in that role. The course also examines the problems and opportunities of those who are the recipients of change in an organization and the skills required to cope effectively with that situation.

BA 641. Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

This course explores human resource management as an integrated process of planning and control designed to achieve high employee productivity and job satisfaction. The course focuses on the essential functions of human resource management as they apply both to the general supervisory responsibilities of every manager and to the specific operations of the personnel department.

BA 642. Leadership in Business and Professions. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide graduate management students with a comprehensive review of the essentials for effective leadership. It focuses on the identification of basic leadership styles, explores the theoretical and practical findings of research in leadership development, and seeks to synthesize the student’s leadership style with the most effective working models of leadership.

BA 643. Corporate Strategy and Public Policy. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to develop in the student an understanding of the corporation’s position in the dynamics of the political system and to increase his or her capacity to deal effectively with public policy initiatives impinging on business. The course examines the roots of public perception of business, reviews the nature of policy-making in the public sector, and explores methods of influencing public opinion and intervening in the public policy process. Readings are drawn from classical and current literature on the subject, and case studies are used to demonstrate management responses to public policy developments.

BA 644. Business Law. 3 Hours.

This course examines the Uniform Commercial Code which forms the basis of the legal framework within which the formal business organization must operate. Topics include: sales contracts, partnerships, corporations, and law governing the sale of personal property.

BA 645. Quantitative Decision-Making. 3 Hours.

This course presents important mathematical concepts and tools used by managers of business, education and nonprofit organizations. Topics include problem Definition, linear programming, regression analysis, subjective probability, decision analysis, and Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT). Prerequisite(s): BA 600.

BA 646. Current Issues in Business. 3 Hours.

This course, conducted in seminar fashion, draws on current literature to analyze contemporary and emerging issues facing management in the late twentieth century. Content will vary.

BA 700. Health Care Management. 3 Hours.

This course examines management problems and policy-making in the health care industry. Several areas are considered including: (1) functions of the health care manager, (2) types of health care delivery systems, (3) the administration of hospitals, (4) the financing of medical care, and (5) the role of government. Through readings, lectures, discussions, and projects, students clarify their own role in the delivery of health services. The course regularly draws on experts in health planning and health care administration.

BA 701. Legal Environment of Health Care Management. 3 Hours.

The course provides a foundation in the legal and regulatory framework in which health care institutions operate. Students will also examine the legal issues confronting health care managers including director and administrative liability, malpractice, negligence, patient rights and confidentiality, licensure requirements, and the like.

BA 702. Health Care Economics. 3 Hours.

In this course, the principles and tools of economic decision-making are applied to management in the health care sector. The course explores the application to health care management functions of such concepts and processes as supply and demand, resource allocation and utilization, costing and pricing, resource productivity, forecasting and economic aspects of planning, and utilization review. While the principal emphasis in the course is on micro-economic analysis, some consideration is also given to an economic analysis of public policy alternatives for the delivery of health care service. Prerequisite(s): BA 601.

BA 703. Financial Management in Health Care Organizations. 3 Hours.

This course applies the perspectives and tools of financial analysis to the management of health care organizations and evaluation of organizational performance. Topics covered include capital budgeting, sources of operating revenue, management of cash and inventories, risk analysis and forecasting. Particular attention is paid to cost containment regulatory strategies and their implications for financial planning and management. Prerequisite(s): BA 602.

BA 710. Law & Ethics for Non-Profit Organizations. 3 Hours.

Non-profit managers and supervisors are held to a higher standard of ethical behavior due to the nature of their funding sources and their mission. This course is designed to develop in the student a basic understanding of the laws governing non-profit organizations, the practical applications of these laws and the ethics that are demanded of non-profit managers.

BA 711. Non-Profit Management and Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course examines the philosophical foundations of the non-profit sector and explores issues and problems specific to managing and leading non-profit organizations. Topics covered include; leading and governing non-profit organizations, managing non-profit operations, board/staff relations, and developing and managing non-profit resources.

BA 712. Strategic Marketing for Nonprofit Organizations. 3 Hours.

This course applies the concepts of marketing and strategy to the management of non-profit organizations. Through class lectures, discussion, case studies, and applied projects, students will build an understanding of the marketing process in the nonprofit environment in order to be able to design, implement, and evaluate an organization’s approach to marketing and strategic positioning.

BA 713. Fundraising. 3 Hours.

This course takes a systems approach to the process of fund-raising. Topics covered include: donor cultivation, use of the annual fund, major gifts, corporate giving, and grant writing.

BA 720. Advanced Sales and Marketing in Hospitality. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on difficult problems and issues facing sales and marketing personnel in the hospitality industry. Students will make use of case studies in order to develop their decision making process including the use of marketing research and analysis.

BA 721. Convention Planning and Events Planning. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the rapidly growing convention sales and events planning industries. The student will learn how to design, plan, market and manage meetings and events.

BA 722. Advanced Front Office Operations. 3 Hours.

This course begins with detailed introduction about numerous aspects of front office operations and management. The next section of the course examines the complex relationships between lodging departments, technological advances, and personnel decisions. The final section of the course includes the many guest service concepts that distinguish a great hotel experience from an average one.

BA 723. Legal Issues in Hospitality Management. 3 Hours.

This course will provide the student an overview of the important aspects of Hospitality Law for Managers, and other professionals. Some of the areas of study include and are not limited to Torts, Products Liability, Constitutional Law and Criminal Law and many other subjects.

BA 724. Managing Service in Food and Beverage Operations. 3 Hours.

This course begins with an introduction to the framework for providing quality service to guests. Next we will discuss menu planning and development, and then we will address issues of equipment and facilities. Finally, the course will explore how issues such as labor, sanitation and health impact guest service and how managers and staff can convert into loyal guests!.

BA 729. Hospitality Graduate Directed Practicum. 3 Hours.

Each student will find or will choose or will be provided with an internship site. The site chosen will be based on; and interview conducted by the management of the internship site, the student's preference of location based on those available. The Coordinator of Hospitality Management will have the final decision on all internship site placements. The Coordinator's decision will be based on his interaction with the student during previous course work and his understanding of the student and the internship properties requirements. Every consideration will be given to the student's personal preferences with regard to location and types of property. However, the student's preferences will not be the only consideration for placement. Prerequisite(s): BA 720 and BA 722 and BA 724.

BA 731. Business and Information Technology. 3 Hours.

This graduate course approaches Information Technology from the perspective of information consumers as opposed to technology implementers. During this course, students will examine various technologies and their application within modern organizations. The course has two primary goals. (1) The course will explain information technologies in non-technical terms so that students can evaluate a technology’s effectiveness relative to any existing alternatives and the overall organizational needs. (2) This course should increase student awareness regarding how they interact with technology in a personal or business setting. Business leaders are constantly bombarded with technology. This course addresses the need to sift through that information in an intelligent manner and make smart business decisions.

BA 745. Innovative Global Strategy. 3 Hours.

This course will build students’ awareness of the challenges that must be addressed and the opportunities that may be present when competing in the global marketplace. The course focuses on how firms apply innovative strategies to create a sustainable competitive advantage in the global arena. Course content will be drawn from readings, case analysis, online content and discussions. The course requires students to analyze and understand real world examples of both successful and unsuccessful global strategy implementation.

BA 790. Independent Study. 3 Hours.

The student studies with a faculty member who specializes in an appropriate field. Emphasis is on individual reading and directed action or research programs which involve student and professor. The student must have the approval of the Dean, the faculty member involved, and must file a written plan of the project with the Graduate Dean. A maximum of three (3) credits may be earned.*.

BA 791. Professional Project. 3 Hours.

The student, or group of students, in consultation with a faculty advisor, determines the nature and scope of the project to be undertaken. The project is essentially practical in nature and is usually related to the student’s work experience. The plan for the project must be filed with the Graduate Committee. A maximum of six (6) credit hours may be earned.*.

BA 792. Graduate Internship I. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 793. Graduate Internship II. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director. Prerequisite(s): BA 792.

BA 794. Graduate Internship III. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director. Prerequisite(s): BA 793.

BA 798. Thesis. 6 Hours.

The thesis may be library-oriented research with extensive reliance on documents and a relatively limited amount of primary field research, or it may be action-oriented field research with relevant documentation from the literature. The title of the thesis topic must be filed with the Graduate Committee. A student, with the approval of his/her advisory committee, may register for the thesis after completion of twenty-four (24) semester hours.

BA 799. Topic/. 3 Hours.

Students work together in a seminar setting under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. The content of the seminar will vary according to the interests of students and faculty involved.