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This is an archived copy of the 2012-13 Catalog. To access the most recent version of the bulletin, please visit .

Computer Information Systems

Computer Information Systems (CIS) specialists design and operate the computer systems that are so vital to businesses and organizations today. The Husson CIS curriculum includes a strong core of general business courses, general education requirements, as well as special training in computer programming, software development, systems development and implementation, networking, and project management.

The two-year Associate in Science program prepares graduates for entry-level positions as computer programmers and networking specialists with potential to move to the level of system analyst or management in CIS and networking. All credits in the two-year program are transferable into the four-year program. At Husson University you will learn to use the computer to manage many different forms of information that are vital to organizations today. Students will learn programming in Visual Basic, HTML, and Java. Courses involving networking and network management as well as website design will give students valuable high-level skills and prepare them to go directly from college into a position of true responsibility.

A special four and one-half year program in Accounting and CIS is also available. A five-year track is available for students who wish to earn a B.S. in CIS. and a Master’s degree in Business.

Students who major in other fields may choose to complete a minor in CIS.

Requirements for CIS Majors

All CIS majors must earn an overall 2.0 cumulative grade-point average as well as a 2.0 overall in their Mi prefix courses. Transfer students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, and at least 15 credits must be earned in Mi prefix courses at Husson University.

Courses

MI 111. Introduction to Microcomputing. 3 Hours.

The elements of hardware, software and the uses of the microcomputer in today’s society. Hands-on experience includes word processing, spreadsheet, database management, and presentation software.

MI 131. Intro to Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Course surveys the historical, social and technological contexts of modern computing and computer science. Students are exposed to material through lectures and a number of online lab activities.

MI 132. Introduction to Web Design. 3 Hours.

Students construct web pages using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and JavaScript. Emphasis is on structures and concepts used in development. Internet technologies, including TCP/IP protocols, client/server programming, and security are discussed.

MI 133. Advanced Web Design. 3 Hours.

Students explore a variety of technologies that can be used in conjunction with HTML to build web pages with rich content. Emphasis is placed on the strengths and weaknesses of the various technologies, as well as appropriate use. Prerequisite(s): MI 132.

MI 214. Microcomputer Spreadsheet Applications. 3 Hours.

This course covers microcomputer spreadsheet software. Topics include: functions, decision making, macros, custom menus, importing and exporting.

MI 221. Cobol I. 3 Hours.

Emphasis is placed on the application of top-down strategies and structured programming techniques to produce management reports. Coverage includes language syntax, data and file structures, input and output, computations, report generation, table processing and control breaks. Prerequisite(s): MI 111.

MI 226. Web Applications. 3 Hours.

Students construct web pages using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and JavaScript. Emphasis is on object-oriented thinking and hands on work. Internet technologies including TCP/IP protocols, client/server programming, and security are also discussed. Prerequisite(s): MI 111.

MI 241. Managing and Maintaining a PC I. 3 Hours.

Course develops a base for supporting end-user workstation system. Emphasis is on hands on installation, configuration, and problem solving computer hardware and software in a laboratory setting. Prepares the student for the Comp TIA's A+ exams. Prerequisite(s): MI 132.

MI 242. Managing and Maintaining a PC II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of Managing and Maintaining a PC I. Prepares the student for the Comp TIA's A+ exams. Prerequisite(s): MI 241.

MI 245. Desktop Publishing. 3 Hours.

Students use current software packages to produce a wide range of high-quality interoffice publications such as forms, proposals and directories, and outside–of-organization communications such as flyers, catalogs, annual reports, brochures, newsletters, etc. Students will become familiar with typographic techniques used to create professional-looking documents. The use of basic design and layout features such as white space, graphic elements, and color will be introduced. Accuracy and creativity are essential as the students design and publish functional promotional materials. A professional portfolio containing sample projects is an integral part of the evaluation process.

MI 261. Introduction to Computer Programming I. 3 Hours.

This is a three credit hour course and the first of a two course sequence serving as an introduction to computer programming. The course covers the basic terminology and structure of writing computer software. In addition, the course establishes a solid foundation in the use of the basic building blocks associated with writing software including data types, variables, conditional and looping constructs, error handling, and debugging. Throughout the course, students will be introduced to and expected to follow industry standards and best practices of the software development discipline.

MI 262. Introduction to Computer Programming II. 3 Hours.

This is a three credit hour course and the second of a two course sequence serving as an introduction to computer programming. The course covers the basic terminology and structure of writing computer software. In addition, the course builds upon the solid foundation in the use of the basic building blocks associated with writing software including arrays, collections, classes, file I/O, and database connections. Throughout the course, students will be introduced to and expected to follow industry standards and best practices of the software development discipline. Prerequisite(s): MI 261.

MI 299. Topic/. 3 Hours.

This course is of variable content with selected topics presented to provide prerequisites for specifically identified additional coursework in CIS. The course emphasizes independent investigation and the fundamental principles of computing and information technology.

MI 321. Systems Analysis & Design. 3 Hours.

Methodology for the investigation analysis and general design, detailed design, and implementation of computer information systems is covered. Comprehensive case studies are used to illustrate the phases of CIS project development. Topics presented for system development include data flow diagrams, normalization, RAD, extreme programming (XP), software development life cycle (SDLC), and program specifications. Prerequisite(s): MI 261.

MI 322. Decision Support and Expert Systems. 3 Hours.

These systems are designed to synthesize what is known about the business application and to make that knowledge available to and effective in the hands of working decision-makers. Topics covered include artificial intelligence, natural language systems, expressing rules, and dealing with uncertainty. Expert system development software is used. Prerequisite(s): MI 111.

MI 325. Algorithms and Data Structures I. 3 Hours.

This is a three credit hour course and the first of a two course sequence serving as an introduction to the algorithms and data structures utilized in computer programming. The course covers the basic data structures used in software development including lists, sorted lists, stacks, queues, sets, and graphs and their implementations. For algorithms, the students will be introduced to a number of algorithm designs including greedy and divide-and-conquer, and specific algorithms including resizing arrays, shortest path, and spanning trees. Prerequisite(s): MI 261.

MI 326. Algorithms and Data Structures II. 3 Hours.

This is a three credit hour course and the second of a two course sequence serving as an introduction to the algorithms and data structures utilized in computer programming. The course covers the basic data structures used in software development including lists, sorted lists, stacks, queues, sets, and graphs and their implementations. For algorithms, the students will be introduced to a number of algorithm designs including greedy and divide-and-conquer, and specific algorithms including resizing arrays, shortest path, and spanning trees. Prerequisite(s): MI 325.

MI 331. Networking. 3 Hours.

This course covers the different types of networking topologies: client-server, peer-to-peer, and network administration. Practical aspects include setting up a network, hardware maintenance, and hands-on experience.

MI 332. Advanced Networking. 3 Hours.

This course builds upon basic network knowledge. Topics covered include network topology, infrastructure, hardware, segmentation, and troubleshooting as networks increase in scale and complexity. Security issues will be examined to protect data assets from internal and external threats. Prerequisite(s): MI 331.

MI 333. Computer Forensics. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the investigative use of computer technologies and electronic records. Students will be exposed to “digital evidence” and the valuable information it can provide to investigators. The course will have a two-tier approach. (1) Students will be shown how to extract readily decipherable information from someone’s computer such as looking for at their files or their browser history of web sites visited. Even if the information is password protected or has been deleted it might still be recoverable. (2) The course will examine criminals who use computers and the Internet to commit various crimes ranging from trying to lure children into chat rooms or face-to-face meetings to every sort of financial fraud. This course is intended to address a growing need in law enforcement. Prerequisite(s): Major=BS Comp Info Systems or Major=BS Criminal Justice.

MI 341. Managing and Maintaining a Windows Server I. 3 Hours.

Course builds on fundamentals developed in MI 241-242 to detail the challenges and technology of distributed system management. Example topics include Configuration Management, Backup/Disaster Recovery, User Management, Data Management, Application Management, Logistics and Licensing. Prerequisite(s): MI 242.

MI 342. Managing and Maintaining a Windows Server II. 3 Hours.

Course is a continuation of MI 341 Managing and Maintaining a Windows Server I. This course focuses on network configuration and security of the server. Prerequisite(s): MI 341.

MI 351. Information System Internship. 3 Hours.

Cooperative Education is a College-supervised work experience course with participating employers in business and nonprofit organizations that provide a practical application of classroom theory. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Junior or College Level=Senior.

MI 352. Information System Internship. 3 Hours.

Cooperative Education is a College-supervised work experience course with participating employers in business and nonprofit organizations that provide a practical application of classroom theory. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Junior or College Level=Senior.

MI 353. Information System Internship. 3 Hours.

Cooperative Education is a College-supervised work experience course with participating employers in business and nonprofit organizations that provide a practical application of classroom theory. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Junior or College Level=Senior.

MI 354. Information System Internship. 3 Hours.

Cooperative Education is a College-supervised work experience course with participating employers in business and nonprofit organizations that provide a practical application of classroom theory. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Junior or College Level=Senior.

MI 361. Java I. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on problem solving using an object-oriented programming language. Emphasis is on programming using modern practices. Prerequisite(s): MI 262.

MI 362. Java II. 3 Hours.

This course builds on language used in MI 361. Explores advanced use of the language including packages for data access and web server scripting. Prerequisite(s): MI 361.

MI 411. Database Design. 3 Hours.

The design of a database as part of the CIS development process is covered in detail. The theory and practical application of both relational and network databases is included. Normalization and SQL are also covered in detail.

MI 421. Project Management Techniques. 3 Hours.

Projects are undertakings, which must be completed within cost, schedule and quality constraints. This course provides the student with practical methodology for planning and managing large or small projects effectively. Software such as Microsoft Project for Windows® is used.

MI 422. Information System Project Development. 3 Hours.

A comprehensive project in CIS is undertaken. The team approach is used to plan, manage and implement a realistic CIS project of moderate complexity. Prerequisite(s): MI 421.

MI 499. Topic/. 1 Hour.

This is a course of variable content. Faculty and students prepare a special topic of timely interest in the area of management information systems. The course may consist of seminars, individualized instruction and/or research related to a specific area of specialization.