Programs in Business Administration

The undergraduate Business Administration majors, leading to A.S., B.S. and dual BS/MBA degrees, prepare learners for challenging careers in a variety of business fields. In addition to the general business administration degree that provides flexibility for taking electives in diverse areas of study, students may concentrate in: entrepreneurship/small business management, financial management, financial planning, healthcare management, international business, management, marketing management, or create an interdisciplinary programs of study (IPS).

In most programs, students seeking to earn their MBA can do so in conjunction with their B.S. degree in just 5 years.  Students also pursuing an MBA may choose a general path of study with a variety of electives or a concentration in: healthcare management, hospitality and tourism management, or organizational management.  Students seeking exposure to Business courses may choose a Business Administration Certificate.

Husson University Business Administration majors develop skills, attitudes, and technical knowledge to prepare them for careers in a wide variety of fields that include not only business and industry, but also government and the not-for-profit sector. They work with faculty who combine academic training with industry  experience, and consider teaching to be their highest priority. Small class size ensures students receive the attention they need to do their best. Internships, experiential classes, and simulations all provide students with opportunities to practice the skills of business before they leave the college setting.

Requirements for the Major

All Business Administration majors must earn an overall 2.0 cumulative grade-point average as well as a 2.0 in their School of Business courses. Transfer students must complete a minimum of 30 credits hours at Husson University with a minimum of 15 credit hours in School of Business courses at Husson.

Courses

BA 101. Introduction to Business. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the general nature of functional areas in business such as marketing, management, accounting, finance, research and development, and risk management. The relationship between business, the government, the economy, and the environment is examined.

BA 111. Economic Geography. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the principles of economic geography, ranging from physical and biological geography to cultural and political factors. The decision making processes, both local and global, for different types of service oriented, manufacturing, transportation, and resource based businesses will be examined. The relationship of natural resources, population, and culture, and how such factors affect economic activity will be emphasized.

BA 201. Business Law I. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with a basic knowledge of the law of contracts, personal property and real property.

BA 202. Business Law II. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to augment BA 201 with in depth analysis of the law in Contracts, UCC, Corporations, Principal Agency Law, Advanced Tort Law, Environmental Law, Real Property Law, Securities Law and Employment Law.

BA 204. Franchise Formation and Management. 3 Hours.

This class will discuss franchise formation and management with particular emphasis on the discovery and evaluation of the franchisor and the feasibility of entrepreneurs converting an existing business into a franchise chain or creating and selling new franchises, domestic and international. Franchise accounting and finance (borrowing or leveraging) will be covered, as well as, taking the franchise to the stock market or going public (IPO) and raising investment capital. Prerequisite(s): BA 401.

BA 205. Real Estate Law. 3 Hours.

This course presents a systematic study of the basic principles of real property law through explanation, discussion and problem-solving techniques. The course provides a decision-oriented approach to legal concepts, featuring student completion of a complete abstract of title at the Penobscot County Registry of Deeds; real estate forms; and comprehension of relevant Maine statutes.

BA 210. Economics Overview for Non-Business Majors. 3 Hours.

This is an overview of microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts for non-business majors. It will include an introduction to American capitalism including the mechanics of supply and demand, elasticity, consumer demand, and price and output determination of competitive firms. It will also be an introduction to national income accounts, unemployment, inflation, government fiscal policy and monetary policy.

BA 211. Microeconomics. 3 Hours.

This is an introduction to American capitalism and microeconomic concepts including the mechanics of supply and demand, elasticity, consumer demand, and price and output determination of purely and impurely competitive firms.

BA 212. Macroeconomics. 3 Hours.

This is an introduction to macroeconomics in the American economy: national income accounts, unemployment, inflation, government fiscal policy, monetary policy and economic growth.

BA 220. Real Estate Principles and Practices. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with methods of analyzing acquisition and retention of Real Estate. Also, there will be a focus on the skills and techniques required to operate a real estate business, including trust accounts, risk management, and property management.

BA 243. The Business of Innovation. 3 Hours.

This is a cross-disciplinary class that will introduce students to the Lean Startup Scientific Method for developing and commercializing ideas for new ventures or else innovating and developing new products or business models within existing companies. Topics include marketplace innovations, technology and science based innovations, marketplace hypothesis development and testing, frugal and agile engineering, business models, intellectual property, prototyping, exit strategies, and fundraising. Lab component is integrated within module deliverables.

BA 245. Marketing Fundamentals. 3 Hours.

The course covers the language and issues of marketing with an emphasis on developing responsive marketing strategies that meet customer needs. The course focuses on marketing concepts, the role of marketing in the organization, and the role of marketing in society. Topics include market segmentation, product development, promotion, distribution, and pricing. Other topics will be incorporated into the course including the external environment (economics, politics, government, and nature), marketing research, international/global marketing with relevance to cultural diversity, ethics, the impact of technology on marketing, and careers in marketing.

BA 271. Risk Management. 3 Hours.

A study is made of the risks encountered by individuals and business firms. A presentation is made of the basic principles and institutions, which have been developed in risk management. This material is treated primarily from the consumer point of view.

BA 299. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

This is a course of variable content. Faculty and students prepare a special topic of timely interest in the business area. This course may consist of seminars, lectures, individualized instruction and/or research related to a specific area of specialization.

BA 300. Business Presentations. 3 Hours.

Communication is a vital function of any business. Managers at all levels must be able to communicate effectively to advance their career and ensure the success of their organization. This course will give students a working knowledge of how to create, brief, and present information across the organizational communications spectrum. Students will learn how to think critically and apply problem solving skills across a variety of historical and contemporary business topics. Students will learn how to collect, analyze, synthesize, and present information in a professional manner to assorted audiences in different venues. The foundational skill set developed in this course is the ability for students to articulate their ideas in a professional manner within a variety of business settings. Prerequisite(s): EH 124.

BA 302. Business Ethics. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to raise a moral consciousness and sensitivity within the various disciplines of the business curriculum. The disciplines focused on here are business, accounting, marketing, multinational corporations, and those areas of human resource management inclusive of diversity in the workplace within the context of environmental and social responsibility.

BA 306. Franchise Law. 3 Hours.

This is a law class that analyzes all the issues of Franchise Law with a particular emphasis on Contracts, Principal/Agent Franchise Relations, Corporate Formation of Franchises, and Securities Law. Prerequisite(s): BA 201 and BA 202.

BA 310. Organization and Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on how to design organization systems and effectively manage them. Students completing the course should understand the universal process of management and key terminology in the language of management. Students are encouraged conceptually to blend contributions from the various schools of management thought into an integrated perspective of what managers do and why.

BA 311. Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

This course addresses traditional personnel administration issues. Emphasis in the course is on how to manage the major human resource administration functions of job design, reward system design, staffing, training and performance control, to achieve maximum employee performance and satisfaction. Prerequisite(s): BA 310 or ( Major=BS Criminal Justice or Major=AS Criminal Justice or Major=AS Paralegal or Major=BS Paralegal or Major=BS English - Prelaw).

BA 312. Non-Profit Management and Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course examines the philosophical foundations of the non-profit sector and explores issues and problems specific to managing and leading non-profit organizations. Topics include leading and governing non-profit organizations, managing non-profit operations, board/staff relations, and developing and managing non-profit resources.

BA 326. Consumer Behavior. 3 Hours.

This course examines theories of consumer motivations and psycho-social and biological variables which influence consumer attitudes, preferences, and decision making. It also looks carefully at the methods that can be used to develop approaches for planning new products and developing effective marketing strategy. Prerequisite(s): PY 111.

BA 334. International Economics. 3 Hours.

This applied economics course will emphasize the use of cases to study topics such as comparative advantage, treaties, tariffs, non-tariff trade barriers, and trade blocks among developed and developing nations. Prerequisite(s): BA 211 and BA 212.

BA 344. Personal Financial Planning. 3 Hours.

This course provides comprehensive coverage of personal financial planning in the areas of money management, axes, consumer credit, housing and other consumer decisions, legal protection, insurance, retirement planning, and estate planning. Prerequisite(s): MS 141 or MS 111 or MS 242 or MS 180 or MS 181.

BA 351. Internship. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 352. Internship II. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 353. Internship III. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 354. Internship IV. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 355. Internship V. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director. Prerequisite(s): BA 351 and BA 352 and BA 353 and BA 354.

BA 362. Financial Management. 3 Hours.

The foundation finance course covers basic corporate financial management issues. Topics include financial statements, financial ratio analysis and capital budgeting. Students are expected to become proficient in financial analysis of a corporation and in various aspects of corporate financial management. Prerequisite(s): AC 121 and BA 211 and (MS 141 or MS 180 or MS 181).

BA 364. Corporate Options and Structure. 3 Hours.

The course is a continuation of Financial Management I and will cover such topics as real options, sensitivity, scenario and break-even analysis, basic issues regarding stocks and bonds, risk/return and cost of capital, capital structure and limits to the use of debt. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 375. Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides the basic concepts of logistics and supply chain management. The student will study logistical problems and appropriate strategie to solve these problems in the major areas of transportation, inventory, location, logistics control and global logistics planning. This course will represent the basic marketing areas: distribution, product, price and promotion.

BA 401. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to close the gap between economic theory and business application. It reviews traditional analysis and shows its application to the understanding and solution of economic problems of the firm and industry. Prerequisite(s): BA 211 and BA 212.

BA 411. Organizational Behavior. 3 Hours.

This course is highly experiential in its approach to helping students understand and appreciate why people behave the way they do in an organizational context. Students learn how to manage employee behavior by analysis of real world phenomena and by application of principles in the areas of human perception and communication, leadership and motivation, small group dynamics, organizational culture, and organizational change. Prerequisite(s): BA 310.

BA 413. Operations Management. 3 Hours.

Quantitative model building and manipulation are a means of analyzing and synthesizing the elements of productions management. Both deterministic and stochastic modeling are emphasized in the areas of work systems design, queuing, PERT, SQC, inventory control, forecasting, and linear and nonlinear programming. Prerequisite(s): BA 310 and MS 132.

BA 414. Business Strategy. 3 Hours.

This Business Administration senior seminar focuses on decision making at the executive management level, the formulation of strategy, and its implementation in the organization. The course will employ case studies, laboratory simulation techniques, and computer spreadsheet analysis. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior.

BA 421. Integrated Marketing Communications. 3 Hours.

The premise of Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) is to emphasize the role of advertising, promotion and public relations in the communication of product and service offerings to consumers. The study of IMC will enhance the student’s knowledge of how IMC is employed in effective marketing mix strategy planning. Students will engage in real world application of IMC by working with local businesses or through case examples. Prerequisite(s): BA 245 or MC 220.

BA 422. Sales and Sales Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with the fundamentals of good salesmanship and sales management. Prior to studying management principles students practice sales techniques in simulations. Cases are used to illustrate and evaluate principles of sales management. Prerequisite(s): BA 245.

BA 423. Retail Management. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamentals of successful retail operations. Topics included are the market concept in retailing, factors of area and market analysis, and aspects of organizational structure, layout, and personnel planning. Also covered are methods of pricing, merchandising planning, inventory, expense control and sales promotion techniques. Prerequisite(s): BA 245.

BA 424. Marketing Research. 3 Hours.

The basic research concepts and practices as applied to the analysis of marketing problems are examined. Topics include sources of data, collecting data, sampling, questionnaire construction, tabulating data, and report preparation; computerized statistical software is used. Prerequisite(s): BA 245 and MS 132.

BA 425. Marketing Management. 3 Hours.

This is the capstone course for marketing majors. Students apply concepts learned in other courses to marketing problems of business and nonprofit organizations. Cases and business simulations are used to teach decision-making in the complex environment of business. A complete marketing plan for a simulated company of the student’s choice summarizes the student’s knowledge of the field. Prerequisite(s): BA 245.

BA 426. Real Estate Market, Research and Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course will discuss market research, real estate sales, property valuations and analysis. Students will examine market research reports to gain insight into product and market trends, opportunities, projections, and growth in the Maine, the US and global real estate markets. Prerequisite(s): BA 401 and MS 132 and (BA 205 or PL 201).

BA 427. Franchise Market Research and Analysis. 3 Hours.

This class will focus on analysis of market demographics, feasibility studies, product pricing, promotion and distribution, franchise broker contacts, extrapolation of sales and expenses, and the projection of costs and net profits, emerging markets and capital expansion. Prerequisite(s): BA 401 and MS 132 and MS 232 and BA 362.

BA 428. Strategic Selling. 3 Hours.

This course builds on the fundamentals of selling. The student will understand how to advance sales in light of complex business environments consisting of layers of buyers, decision makers and those who influence purchasing decisions. A strategic account planning process will be analyzed and applied to real companies by way of case studies. The art and skill of negotiating will be studied and learned through role play. Prerequisite(s): BA 422.

BA 429. Competitive Intelligence. 3 Hours.

In this course, students engage in the discipline of competitive intelligence which involves the collection and analysis of relevant information that allows for more effective, timely and efficient decision making by key company leaders. Students examine the transition over the past three decades of cold war intelligence efforts being applied to global business competition. This transition has compelled companies to be more cognizant of their external environment and the rapid and profound changes in the market place. Prerequisite(s): MS 132.

BA 434. International Finance. 3 Hours.

In this course, students examine the factors affecting exchange rates, the different types of exchange rate systems, and how governments attempt to influence exchange rates. The relationships among interest rate parity, purchasing power parity, the Fisher effect and International Fisher effect, and exchange rates are analyzed. Students learn how currency futures, currency options and money market hedges are used to hedge exchange rate risk. Additionally, students research investment opportunities and make buy/sell recommendations for the student-directed James and Carol Carlisle Fund. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 437. International Marketing. 3 Hours.

The basics of international marketing will be taught including the foundations of culture, cultural understanding, business customs and practices in global marketing, assessing global markets, and developing international marketing strategy. Prerequisite(s): BA 245.

BA 438. Export-Import Procedures. 3 Hours.

The basics of export-import procedures will be taught including justification for exporting/importing, market planning methods, selection of appropriate marketing mix variables, and regulation. Prerequisite(s): BA 245.

BA 439. International Franchising Management. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on international expansion of franchises, learning the culture, monetary exchanges, imports and exports, local international market analysis and much more. Prerequisite(s): BA 204 and BA 306 and BA 427.

BA 440. Small Business Management I. 3 Hours.

This course supplies prospective and current small business managers with the essential concepts of starting and operating small businesses. Topics covered include: environment and management of small business enterprise, problems in starting small businesses, financial and administrative control, and management of business operations. Particular emphasis is placed on the interrelated nature of the components, particularly as they affect the financial picture of the firm. Through a lecture and discussion format, students are expected to share their own experiences in small businesses with their fellow students. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior or College Level=Junior.

BA 441. Entrepreneurship I- New Venture Development. 3 Hours.

Students will be introduced to the practical application of classic and contemporary business theory as it applies to the early stages of entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship, opportunity recognition, innovation, and new venture development. Course topics include types of entrepreneurs, opportunity recognition, marketing, cash and other resource requirements, financial statements, planning, franchising, intellectual property, success/failure/resilience, and growth. Class will use text, cases, articles, internet sources, and guest lecturers. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior or College Level=Junior.

BA 442. Applied Small Business Management. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced course which focuses on real problems in Small Business Management, using the case approach. Cases are drawn from the text, from actual local small businesses, and from the practical experience of students in the class. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Junior or College Level=Senior.

BA 443. Entrepreneurship II: Business Plans. 3 Hours.

This class builds on BA 441, New Venture Development. The focus of this class is on the early stages of formalizing and growing a venture. Topics include business plan writing, fund raising and cash flow, measuring and conveying financial position, core strategy development and competitive advantage, sustainability, international entrepreneurship, supply chain, growth, and exit. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Junior or College Level=Senior.

BA 460. Investments I. 3 Hours.

This course begins with an introduction to financial markets and investment instruments. Additional topics include risk and return, margin trading and short sales, mutual funds and stock quotations and trading procedures. Students are introduced to the theories of market efficiency and behavioral finance. Additionally, students research investment opportunities and make buy/sell recommendations for a student-directed investment fund. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 464. Bank & Financial Services Management. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to specific issues involved in financial management of a banking firm and, to a lesser extent, other financial intermediaries. Emphasis is on products, roles, regulatory framework, and risk management. Students also analyze the financial statements of a bank, and research investment opportunities to make buy/sell recommendations for the student-directed James and Carol Carlisle Fund. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 465. Biotechnology: The Business of Genetics. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to become familiar with the scope and nature of organizations that work with genetics within biotechnology industries. Through extensive case studies, students focus on the dynamics of these enterprises, their organizational structures, the regulatory considerations of these entities, and how organizational cultures are created to enhance opportunities for innovation and discovery.

BA 466. Investments II. 3 Hours.

Through this course, students learn the relationship between interest rates and bond prices. Diversification and portfolio evaluation measures are also discussed. Students are introduced to futures contracts and option contracts mechanics and strategies. Students learn how to find and use financial information about companies. Additionally, students research investment opportunities and make buy/sell recommendations for a student-directed investment fund. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 471. Life and Health Insurance. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to provide background knowledge for personal application and for those responsible for administering benefit plans for employees; it provides the necessary information required to pass the State of Maine license examination. Prerequisite(s): BA 271.

BA 472. Casualty and Property Insurance. 3 Hours.

The first part of the course introduces the basics of the entire insurance business, including a summary of legal aspects, types of insurers and principles of reinsurance; next, each type of insurance is studied in detail. Topics covered are fire, consequential loss, inland marine, ocean marine, theft and surety, liability and miscellaneous property insurance. Prerequisite(s): BA 271.

BA 473. Real Estate Appraisal. 3 Hours.

This course familiarizes the student with the foundation and principles of the appraisal process. The student will become familiar with the three approaches to value. Site valuation, construction costs, depreciation; comparables selection and adjustments; rental multipliers; and reconciliation will be discussed. The student will focus on the elements making up the standards for professional appraisal practice. These elements, i.e., Definitions, Rules, Standards and Standard Rules, Statements and advisory opinions are discussed in detail along with the philosophy and history of USPAP. Prerequisite(s): BA 401 and MS 132 and BA 362.

BA 475. E-Business and E-Commerce for Managers. 3 Hours.

This course teaches the basic e-business and e-commerce theory. The students will apply the theory through the development of a website for the prime purpose of marketing a product or service or idea online.

BA 480. Project Management Techniques. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with practical methodologies for planning and managing large or small projects effectively. In addition, students undertake projects which must be completed within cost, schedule, and quality constraints. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior.

BA 481. Benefits and Estate Planning. 3 Hours.

This course has two main purposes. The first is to provide a knowledge base regarding the administrative and tax rules and regulations and to familiarize the student with the tools of estate planning. The second purpose is to enable students to use this knowledge and the tools to engage in the strategies employed by estate planners to carry out the wishes of their clients. Prerequisite(s): BA 271.

BA 486. Financial Plan Development. 3 Hours.

In this course, students demonstrate the ability to integrate, apply and communicate the knowledge of financial planning topics. Students prove their ability to apply the financial planning process to real-life situations, as well as communicate financial planning recommendations to a client. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 490. International Business. 3 Hours.

This course covers the international dimensions of managerial decision-making including: world economies, international trade theories, tariffs, quotas and other trade issues, global strategic planning, cross-cultural management, international market entry, international human resource management, international organization strategy, international logistics, import/export operations, currency exchange, international financial management. Current developments in global economic and business are emphasized; students participate in a computerized simulation throughout the semester. Prerequisite(s): BA 310 and BA 245.

BA 495. Senior Management Project. 3 Hours.

An experiential course that gives seniors the opportunity to apply what they have learned in class to a real business situation. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior.

BA 496. Leadership Maine. 3 Hours.

This course awards academic credit for participation in the Bangor Region Leadership Institute (BRLI) program or the Leadership Maine program. Both programs are designed to lead students in an exploration of leadership and their leadership capabilities. Throughout the programs, students are introduced to key social and economic issues impacting the local region and the state of Maine. The programs culminate in an experiential project undertaken with a non-profit partner.

BA 497. Business and Culture Travel Study Course. 3 Hours.

Business and Culture Travel Study course is designed to expose students to economies across the world. During the course students will travel to important commercial, cultural and governmental cities. Through a combination of readings students will be exposed to 20th and 21st century history, economics, culture political and business philosophy. The course will also involve visits to major multinational corporations, cultural activities and lectures from University business faculty when available. The course will also have two pre-trip class sessions with readings and one post course session to wrap up the experience and discuss the student travel logs.

BA 498. Business Seminar. 3 Hours.

This honors course requires the study of various business problems under the supervision of members of the Department of Business Administration. A paper is required. An oral examination is scheduled as the final examination in the course. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior.

BA 499. Topic/. 1-3 Hour.

This is a course of variable content. Faculty and students prepare a special topic of timely interest in the business area. This course may consist of seminars, lectures, individualized instruction and/or research related to a specific area of specialization.

BA 600. Research Methods in Business and Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for beginning graduate students who have little or no formal preparation in those areas of research and problem-solving essential for a comprehensive study of business and education at the graduate level. Emphasis is placed on the identification of common problem types and the selection and use of appropriate methods of analysis (primarily statistical in nature).

BA 601. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

This course begins with a comprehensive overview of micro- and macroeconomic concepts with the aim of developing within students a picture of how business and nonprofit organizations relate to the economy as a whole. The course then focuses on practical applications of economic analysis to problems of concern to managers. Case studies and projects are used to demonstrate the methods used to determine economic feasibility and cost-effectiveness of products, services, and programs.

BA 602. Managerial Accounting. 3 Hours.

This is an accelerated accounting course for those with little or no formal accounting background. The emphasis is on concepts which managers need to know in order to be effective. Topics include the preparation and interpretation of financial statements, cost planning and control, cost-volume-profit analysis, decision-making models, master budgeting and variances, and evaluation of capital projects.

BA 605. Management Communications. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced communications course that builds upon a student’s experience and prior undergraduate coursework in writing and oral communications. Topics include: advanced business writing, use of visual materials, selection of secondary sources of information, report preparation, and presentations to small and large groups.

BA 611. Organizational Behavior. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the major field of management, examining structures and processes on both group and organizational levels. Both traditional and contemporary theories are analyzed and applied to business operations.

BA 620. Financial Management. 3 Hours.

Topics considered include financial planning, operating and capital budgets, cash flow, purchasing and accounting procedures, the sources and uses of corporate and institutional funds, and financial analysis for evaluation and control. Students develop projects specifically related to their needs in educational administration, small business, or corporate management. Prerequisite(s): BA 602 or AC 301.

BA 621. Marketing Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on complex problems facing decision-makers in the marketing of goods and services. Emphasis is placed on the decision-making process, including assessment of the social, economic, and political environment in which the organization operates; problem definition; development and evaluation of alternatives, and the implementation of the best alternative. Cases in advertising, sales, marketing research, and strategic marketing management provide practice in marketing analysis and decision-making.

BA 622. Production Management. 3 Hours.

Emphasis is placed on the use of quantitative techniques for solving manufacturing problems. The student is given an opportunity to practice mathematical model-building and manipulation. Other topics considered include queuing system design, plant layout, statistical quality control, inventory modeling, Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT), linear and nonlinear programming, and control theory.

BA 625. Global Strategic Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the strategic challenges and opportunities confronting firms that undertake to create value and to compete in the global economy. Successful companies develop strategies for doing business in emerging markets that are different from those they use at home and often find novel ways of implementing them too. The class will make extensive use of case analysis and discussion to evaluate and understand the strategic issues that confront firms operating internationally, as well as to appreciate the importance of values and ethics in organization decisions and actions. In this course we will probe the workings of business strategies in transition and emerging economies, gain an understanding of the strategies of local firms, and analyze the international success and failure of companies. Prerequisite(s): BA 600 and 15 Credits From Range [BA 600 To BA 799].

BA 626. Accounting in Planning, Budgeting and Control. 3 Hours.

This course examines the role of accounting in the planning, budgeting, and control process of a business in a dynamic environment. The integration of measuring and analyzing (planning), short-term decisions and managing organizations (control), and preparing various budgets (budgeting) are emphasized. This course is designed as a continuation of BA602 Managerial Accounting. Numerical problems, as well as case studies, are utilized as methods of study. Prerequisite(s): BA 602 or AC 211.

BA 627. Investment Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course provides a detailed description of securities market organization and approaches to investment opportunities. Students will examine theories used in the valuation of financial securities and employ projects and applications to develop a real world understanding of portfolio management. Prerequisite(s): BA 602.

BA 628. New Venture Planning and Management. 3 Hours.

This course deals with the foundation of new ventures and related aspects of managing the small growing enterprise. Techniques taught in this course are equally applicable to small businesses, nonprofit organizations, and new ventures of larger organizations. Topics include: use of scarce resources, such as money, talent and technological expertise; identification of environmental threats and opportunities; and operational considerations such as organizational structure, legal requirements, financing, and accounting procedures.

BA 641. Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

This course explores human resource management as an integrated process of planning and control designed to achieve high employee productivity and job satisfaction. The course focuses on the essential functions of human resource management as they apply both to the general supervisory responsibilities of every manager and to the specific operations of the personnel department.

BA 642. Leadership in Business and Professions. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide graduate management students with a comprehensive review of the essentials for effective leadership. It focuses on the identification of basic leadership styles, explores the theoretical and practical findings of research in leadership development, and seeks to synthesize the student’s leadership style with the most effective working models of leadership.

BA 643. Strategic Change Management. 3 Hours.

Strategic Change Management focuses on the skills required to deal effectively with organizational change. The course addresses first the pressures in the business environment that make change a fundamental reality for managers. Particular attention is paid to change arising from public policy initiatives that impinge on business. The course then examines the manager as change agent responsible for initiating innovation and explores both the personal skills required in the role of change agent and the tools and techniques available to support the manager in that role. The course also examines the problems and opportunities of those who are the recipients of change in an organization and the skills required to cope effectively with that situation.

BA 644. The Legal Environment of Business. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an overview of the important aspects of business law for executives, managers, accountants, and other professionals. The areas of law covered include but are not limited to administrative, contract, corporate and other business organizations, employment relations, real estate, taxes, and UCC sales.

BA 646. Current Issues in Business. 3 Hours.

This course, conducted in seminar fashion, draws on current literature to analyze contemporary and emerging issues facing management in the late twentieth century. Content will vary.

BA 700. Health Care Management. 3 Hours.

This course examines management problems and policy-making in the health care industry. Several areas are considered including: (1) the functions of the health care manager, (2) the types of health care delivery systems, (3) the administration of hospitals, (4) the financing of medical care, and (5) the role of government. Through readings, lectures, discussions, and projects, students clarify their own role in the delivery of health services. The course regularly draws on experts in health planning and health care administration.

BA 701. Legal Environment of Health Care Management. 3 Hours.

The course provides a foundation in the legal and regulatory framework in which health care institutions operate. Students will also examine the legal issues confronting health care managers including director and administrative liability, malpractice, negligence, patient rights and confidentiality, licensure requirements, and the like.

BA 702. Health Care Economics. 3 Hours.

In this course, the principles and tools of economic decision-making are applied to management in the health care sector. The course explores the application to health care management functions of such concepts and processes as supply and demand, resource allocation and utilization, costing and pricing, resource productivity, forecasting and economic aspects of planning, and utilization review. While the principal emphasis in the course is on micro-economic analysis, some consideration is also given to an economic analysis of public policy alternatives for the delivery of health care service. Prerequisite(s): BA 601.

BA 703. Financial Management in Healthcare Organizations. 3 Hours.

This course applies the perspectives and tools of financial analysis to the management of health care organizations and evaluation of organizational performance. Topics covered include capital budgeting, sources of operating revenue, management of cash and inventories, risk analysis and forecasting. Particular attention is paid to cost containment regulatory strategies and their implications for financial planning and management. Prerequisite(s): BA 602.

BA 704. Managing Quality in Healthcare. 3 Hours.

This course examines methods and tools for managing quality in health facilities, physician practices, managed care, and public health. Topics include developments in quality assurance and improvement, utilization review, risk management, and patient satisfaction.

BA 705. Global Perspectives in Healthcare. 3 Hours.

This course examines the social, political, and economic aspects of global healthcare issues. Through a comparative analysis of the health systems of multiple nations, students will compare theories of health policy and priorities, healthcare system facilities, workforce, technology, cost, quality, and access. The emphasis of the course will be on health management strategies used in different countries and healthcare systems to mobilize, allocate, and maintain resources to improve the healthcare status and delivery systems.

BA 710. Law & Ethics for Non-Profit Organizations. 3 Hours.

Non-profit managers and supervisors are held to a higher standard of ethical behavior due to the nature of their funding sources and their mission. This course is designed to develop in the student a basic understanding of the laws governing non-profit organizations, the practical applications of these laws and the ethics that are demanded of non-profit managers.

BA 711. Non-Profit Management and Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course examines the philosophical foundations of the non-profit sector and explores issues and problems specific to managing and leading non-profit organizations. Topics covered include: leading and governing non-profit organizations, managing non-profit operations, board/staff relations, and developing and managing non-profit resources.

BA 712. Strategic Marketing for Nonprofit Organizations. 3 Hours.

This course applies the concepts of marketing and strategy to the management of non-profit organizations. Through class lectures, discussion, case studies, and applied projects, students will build an understanding of the marketing process in the non-profit environment in order to be able to design, implement, and evaluate an organization’s approach to marketing and strategic positioning.

BA 713. Fundraising. 3 Hours.

This course takes a systems approach to the process of fund-raising. Topics covered include: donor cultivation, use of the annual fund, major gifts, corporate giving, and grant writing.

BA 720. Advanced Sales and Marketing in Hospitality. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on difficult problems and issues facing sales and marketing personnel in the hospitality industry. Students will make use of case studies in order to develop their decision-making process including the use of marketing research and analysis.

BA 721. Convention Planning and Events Planning. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the rapidly growing convention sales and events planning industries. The student will learn how to design, plan, market and manage meetings and events.

BA 722. Advanced Front Office Operations. 3 Hours.

This course begins with detailed introduction about numerous aspects of front office operations and management. The next section of the course examines the complex relationships between lodging departments, technological advances, and personnel decisions. The final section of the course includes the many guest service concepts that distinguish a great hotel experience from an average one.

BA 723. Legal Issues in Hospitality Management. 3 Hours.

This course will provide the student an overview of the important aspects of Hospitality Law for Managers, and other professionals. Some of the areas of study include and are not limited to Torts, Products Liability, Constitutional Law and Criminal Law and many other subjects.

BA 724. Managing Service. 3 Hours.

This course begins with an introduction to the framework for providing quality service to customers and guests. Next we will discuss the needs of the customer/guest and proceed to develop our menu and/or product accordingly. Finally, we will learn how management and staff create loyal customers and guests by delivering service that exceeds their expectations.

BA 725. Strategic Management & Leadership in Athletics. 3 Hours.

This course examines contemporary theories related to the critical functions of management and leadership in athletic administration. It emphases a wide array of management, organizational, and leadership theories and practices and the strategic importance to athletic organizations. This course also addresses various skills, roles, and functions that are expected of athletic administrators.

BA 726. Information Management in Athletics. 3 Hours.

This course examines theories and practices related to the complex field of athletic communication and media relations. Emphasis is given to the exploration of the relationship that exists between internal and external entities associated with the athletic industry. This course covers various topics within the areas of media relations, marketing, sales, sales management, and sport information.

BA 727. Legal Issues & Risk Management in Athletics. 3 Hours.

This course examines principles of contract, tort, intellectual property, constitutional, and administrative law as applied to the growing and complex field of athletic administration. Emphasis is given to negligence, defamation and libel, contract negotiation, risk management, criminal and civil law, the rights of student-athletes and the legal liability and responsibly of coaches, and athletic administrators.

BA 728. Governance & Policy in Athletics. 3 Hours.

This course integrates management theory with sport governance and policy development practice. It emphasizes interscholastic and intercollegiate athletics and provides students with an understanding of the authority, organizational structures, and function of the major governing bodies in professional and amateur sport organizations at the local, national, and global levels. The course also covers the study of policy development in educational, non-profit, professional, and international sport organizations.

BA 729. Hospitality Graduate Directed Practicum. 3 Hours.

Each student will find, will choose or will be provided with an internship site. The site chosen will be based on; and interview conducted by the management of the internship site and the student's preference of location based on those available. The Coordinator of Hospitality Management will have the final decision on all internship site placements. The Coordinator's decision will be based on his or her interaction with the student during previous course work, his or her understanding of the student and the internship properties requirements. Every consideration will be given to the student's personal preferences with regard to location and types of property. However, the student's preferences will not be the only consideration for placement. Prerequisite(s): BA 720 and BA 722 and BA 724.

BA 730. Athletic Administration Graduate Directed Practicum. 3 Hours.

Each student will find, will choose, or will be provided with an internship site. The site chosen will be based upon; an interview conducted by the management of the internship site, the mentor, and the student’s preference of location based on availability. The Director of the Program will have the final decision on all internship site placements. The Director’s decision will be based on his interaction with the student during previous coursework and his understanding of the requirements of the student and the internship site.

BA 731. Business and Information Technology. 3 Hours.

This graduate course approaches Information Technology from the perspective of information consumers as opposed to technology implementers. During this course, students will examine various technologies and their application within modern organizations. The course has two primary goals. (1) The course will explain information technologies in non-technical terms so that students can evaluate a technology’s effectiveness relative to any existing alternatives and the overall organizational needs. (2) This course should increase student awareness regarding how they interact with technology in a personal or business setting. Business leaders are constantly bombarded with technology. This course addresses the need to sift through that information in an intelligent manner and make smart business decisions.

BA 741. Staffing & Selection. 3 Hours.

A source of competitive advantage for any organization is its talent. The effectiveness of an organization depends on the performance of each individual in that organization. Hence, one of the most important human resource functions is that of staffing the organization. This course is essential for HR professionals who are responsible for recruiting, screening, hiring, promoting, and outplacing employees. It is also very crucial for any line managers, supervisors, team leaders, and hiring managers who are involved in recruiting, making promotions, succession, or any other workforce decisions. An examination of the scientific, legal, and administrative issues associated with the recruitment, selection, employment and retention of individuals by organizations augments the study. Specific attention will be given to the current challenges of an increasingly dynamic workplace and diverse workforce.

BA 742. Training & Development. 3 Hours.

The effective training and development of human resources creates tremendous and unique value for an organization. This course examines how organizations can develop and manage the talents and skillset of human capital. The course explores topics such as training needs analysis, formulating training objectives, and the design, implementation, and evaluation of training and development programs.

BA 745. Innovative Global Strategy. 3 Hours.

This course will build students’ awareness of the challenges that must be addressed and the opportunities that may be present when competing in the global marketplace. The course focuses on how firms apply innovative strategies to create a sustainable competitive advantage in the global arena. Course content will be drawn from readings, case analysis, online content and discussions. The course requires students to analyze and understand real world examples of both successful and unsuccessful global strategy implementation.

BA 750. Fundamentals of Risk Management. 3 Hours.

This course explores the fundamentals of risk management. After discussion of the importance of risk and the rationale for its management in organizations, the remainder of the course will analyze the process of and methods for managing risk.

BA 751. Employee Benefits. 3 Hours.

This course explores the nature and operation of employer-sponsored benefit plans. Emphasis is placed on plan design, administration, funding, and regulation. The course also addresses organizational characteristics, benefit structure, and pricing of risk transfer schemes for groups.

BA 752. Crisis Management. 3 Hours.

Crisis Management can be defined as a communications response to an event that has a negative impact on an audience - the public, customers/clients, employees, shareholders, etc. Examples of such events could include tainted food, a corporate leak, a political scandal, an entertainment or athletic scandal, damaged products that cause or could potentially cause life-threatening situations, natural disasters, terrorism, and financial disasters. In this course, students will analyze and critique high-profile cases and learn how to effectively respond to crises.

BA 753. Corporate Risk Management. 3 Hours.

Corporate risk is analyzed through the lens of enterprise risk management. This course explores the operational and financial risks faced by firms and the study of various methods of handling these risks.

BA 754. Strategic Selling. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is on key, strategic customer selling approaches. The process of sales planning and strategy development for these types of customers will be emphasized. The objective of this course is to understand and execute sales strategies for managing major and large customers.

BA 760. Technology & Innovation. 3 Hours.

BA 760 Technology & Innovation offers a research approach to identifying, analyzing, and creating technological advantage in nascent and mature industries. Students will apply the methodologies of innovation and discovery to business settings and markets, seeking to create competitive advantage and achieve market transformation through strategic initiatives that redefine consumer expectations and industry practices and reframe organizations to embrace innovative practices and processes.

BA 761. Biotechnology: The Business of Genetics. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to become familiar with the scope and nature of organizations that work with genetics within biotechnology industries. Through extensive case studies, students focus on the dynamics of these enterprises, their organizational structures, the regulatory considerations of these entities, and how organizational cultures are created to enhance opportunities for innovation and discovery.

BA 762. Groupthink. 3 Hours.

This course explores the origin of groupthink. Groupthink is a term first used by social psychologist Irving L. Janis (1972) that refers to a psychological phenomenon in which people strive for consensus within a group. This course explores groupthink as a phenomenon where people set aside their own personal beliefs or adopt the opinion of the rest of the group.

BA 763. Biotechnology & Innovation: Intellectual Property. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the protection of proprietary and intellectual rights in inventions, writings, creative works, software, industry trade secrets, industry trade designations, and other intellectual assets at the international, Federal, and State Levels. The course will give special consideration to the emergence of new areas of patent law in Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical fields, examining not only the patentability of intellectual assets, but also the discovery process, particularly in collaborative environments involving multiple organizations and institutions, and the qualifying distinctions between collaborative and competitive research.

BA 790. Independent Study. 3 Hours.

The student studies with a faculty member who specializes in an appropriate field. Emphasis is on individual reading and directed action or research programs which involve student and professor. The student must have the approval of the dean, the faculty member involved, and must file a written plan of the project with the graduate dean. A maximum of three (3) credits may be earned.*.

BA 791. Professional Project. 3-6 Hours.

This course is used to award graduate credit for prior learning and educational experience obtained outside of the traditional classroom. Through the preparation of a professional project, students provide formal documentation of the specific graduate-level learning competencies which they have acquired through prior experience. A maximum of six (6) credit hours may be earned.

BA 792. Graduate Internship I. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 793. Graduate Internship II. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization's supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director. Prerequisite(s): BA 792.

BA 794. Graduate Internship III. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director. Prerequisite(s): BA 793.

BA 796. Leadership Maine. 3 Hours.

This course awards academic credit for participation in the Bangor Region Leadership Institute (BRLI) program or the Leadership Maine program. Both programs are designed to lead students in an exploration of leadership and their leadership capabilities. Throughout the programs, students are introduced to key social and economic issues impacting the local region and the state of Maine. The programs culminate in an experiential project undertaken with a non-profit partner.

BA 798. Thesis. 6 Hours.

The thesis may be library-oriented research with extensive reliance on documents and a relatively limited amount of primary field research, or it may be action-oriented field research with relevant documentation from the literature. The title of the thesis topic must be filed with the graduate committee. A student, with the approval of his/her advisory committee, may register for the thesis after completion of twenty-four (24) semester hours.

BA 799. Topic/. 3 Hours.

Students work together in a seminar setting under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. The content of the seminar will vary according to the interests of students and faculty involved.