M.S. in Occupational Therapy

Once the prerequisites are completed the program should take three years to complete.

Occupational Therapy Classes
HS 301Introduction to Public Health3
HS 411Health Economics and Policy3
OT 320Occupational Analysis3
OT 300Principles of Human Movement & Occupational Performance3
OT 321Theory & Assessment I3
OT 322Professional Foundations of Occupational Therapy3
OT 323Theory & Assessment II4
OT 330Functional Anatomy4
OT 331Neuroscience5
OT 361Professional Integration A: Advocacy and Social Context1
OT 380Integrative Health I: Wellness2
OT 413Children & Youth I3
OT 414Children & Youth II4
OT 440Mental Health I4
OT 441Mental Health II3
OT 449Rehabilitation & Participation I4
OT 450Rehabilitation and Participation II4
OT 452Context and Environment3
OT 460Professional Integration B: Service Delivery and Management1
OT 461Professional Integration C: Professional Responsibilities and Leadership1
OT 470Research & Evidence-based Practice I3
OT 471Research & Evidence-based Practice II3
OT 561Level Two Fieldwork IIA6
OT 562Level Two Fieldwork IIB6
OT 563Clinical Integration: Research and Evidence-based Practice2
OT 570Seminar: Research & Evidence-based Practice III3
OT 580Integrative Health II: Spirituality2
OT 581Upper Extremity: Research and Evidence-Based Practice3
OT 582Neurorehabilitation: Research & Evidence-Based Practice3
OT 583Work & Industry: Research and Evidence-Based Practice3
Select one of the following:3
Topic/
Graduate Business Electives
Graduate Health Elective
Total Hours98

Suggested Course Sequence

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours 
OT 3003HS 3013 
OT 3223OT 3234 
OT 3304OT 3315 
OT 3203OT 3611 
OT 3213OT 3802 
 16 15
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHoursSummerHours
HS 4113OT 4713OT 5616
OT 4133OT 4504 
OT 4404OT 4523 
OT 4494OT 4611 
OT 4601OT 4413 
OT 4703OT 4144 
 18 18 6
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours 
OT 5703OT 5626 
OT 5823OT 5632 
OT 5833  
OT 599 (OR Grad HS Elective, OR Grad Business Elective)3  
OT 5802  
OT 5813  
 17 8
Total Hours: 98

Courses

OT 299. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

This course of variable content will provide students with the opportunity to explore selected topics in occupational therapy under the guidance of occupational therapy faculty.

OT 300. Prin of Human Movement Factors & Occupational Performance. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with foundational knowledge in the neuromusculoskeletal and movement-related functions of the human body. Students will learn and apply kinesiological and biomechanical principles underlying person-centered occupational performance and engagement. They will develop the basic ability to assess and analyze the client factors which are fundamental to the performance of meaningful occupation. The role of reflexes and other involuntary movement reactions will be covered as well as an introduction to the basic concepts of motor control. Laboratory sessions will stress motor evaluations, treatment planning, wheelchair assessment, transfers, movement analysis, and the psychodynamics of physical rehabilitation. Prerequisite(s): ((SC 221 and SL 221) and (SC 222 and SL 222)) or ( Major=MS Occupational Therapy and ( College Level=Grad Freshman or College Level=Grad Sophomore or College Level=Grad Junior or College Level=Grad Senior)).

OT 320. Occupational Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on foundational concepts that underlie the practice of occupational therapy, i.e. occupation-based activity analysis and analysis of occupational performance. Students will be introduced to the nature of occupation as viewed by the profession and the value of occupational engagement across diverse contexts and environments. Client factors, performance skills and patterns as well as the context and the demands of activities will considered in preparation for developing interventions in support of engagement in client-identified meaningful occupations. Prerequisite(s): Major=MS Occupational Therapy.

OT 321. Theory & Assessment I. 3 Hours.

This is the first of a two-course series integrating occupational therapy theory with assessment. Students will be introduced to the theoretical foundations of occupational therapy, including the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework, the importance of the history and philosophical base of the profession, and the process of theory development. An overview of client-centered theories will provide a foundational base for occupational engagement. It will also introduce core concepts of evaluation and assessment as well as the evaluation process. The link between theory and assessment will be reinforced by applying a model of practice and the associated assessment tools to a client story, thereby integrating theory and assessment in a clinically meaningful context.

OT 322. Professional Foundations of Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

Students will appreciate and value the AOTA Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and the Standards of Practice as well discuss challenges of personal/organizational ethical conflicts and conflict resolution. State licensing and scope of practice will be discussed as will importance of and requirements for ongoing professional development. Professional liability will be examined. Developing leadership skills through participation in professional associations and professional advocacy will be emphasized. Professional documentation will be introduced. Prerequisite(s): Major=MS Occupational Therapy.

OT 323. Theory & Assessment II. 4 Hours.

This is the second of a two-course series integrating occupational therapy theory with assessment. In this course, students will analyze selected culturally relevant, client-centered, occupation and performance-based models. The models are applied to clinical stories representing life span development and varied contexts. Students are also exposed to multiple assessment tools associated with each model to reinforce the link between theory, evaluation and occupational engagement. The course teaches students to engage in the process of using novel assessment tools and clinical reasoning for the evaluation process and corresponding documentation. Prerequisite(s): OT 321.

OT 330. Functional Anatomy. 4 Hours.

This course will build on previous anatomy & physiology coursework. Content will focus intensively on body structures in order to understand the interactions between them in support of the ability to participate in meaningful occupations throughout life. An emphasis on the musculo-skeletal system, peripheral nervous system and cardio-vascular system will be reinforced by cadaver dissection opportunities in the Anatomy Lab. Prerequisite(s): ((SC 221 and SL 221) and (SC 222 and SL 222)) or ( Major=MS Occupational Therapy and ( College Level=Grad Freshman or College Level=Grad Sophomore or College Level=Grad Junior or College Level=Grad Senior)).

OT 331. Neuroscience. 5 Hours.

This course will provide students with in-depth understanding of the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the central and peripheral nervous systems. There will be special emphasis on mental functions, sensory functions, and the motor system as they contribute to occupational performance. The impact of various clinical conditions on participation in meaningful activities will be introduced. Students understanding will be supplemented with learning activities that include cadaver dissections. Prerequisite(s): (SC 221 and SC 222 and SL 221 and SL 222) or (( College Level=Grad Freshman or College Level=Grad Sophomore or College Level=Grad Junior or College Level=Grad Senior) and Major=MS Occupational Therapy).

OT 361. Professional Integration A: Advocacy and Social Context. 1 Hour.

This is the first of three professional integration courses. In this course, students demonstrate novice-level application and integration of didactic concepts that they have learned in the classroom in a clinical or community setting. They apply knowledge and skills from entry level foundation courses to promote awareness of and advocate for access to Occupational Therapy services. There is an emphasis on awareness of the impact of social, cultural and political factors on occupational engagement and meaningful participation. Prerequisite(s): OT 322.

OT 380. Integrative Health I: Wellness. 2 Hours.

This is the first of two courses on integrative health, which considers the dynamic interaction between mind, body, spirit and community. This course introduces the concepts of wellness, health promotion, prevention, and spirituality and their contributions to well-being and occupational engagement. This content is addressed in part through self-reflection as students explore and apply evidence-based approaches of wellness to themselves. Students will develop increased awareness of their own values and beliefs and how they may interact, influence and contribute to health and wellness. Prerequisite(s): OT 322.

OT 413. Children & Youth I. 3 Hours.

This is the first of two courses covering the foundations of contemporary, ethical family-centered occupational therapy practice for children and youth. This semester has an emphasis on infants and young children and their families. Students apply theoretical concepts from developmental and occupation based models to understand the impact of client factors on occupational engagement and performance. Client-centered assessments and outcome measures, used in practice with children and families are explored. Evidence-based clinical reasoning is emphasized as students develop meaningful interventions and identify outcomes in support of occupational engagement in a variety of contexts and environments. Finally, students understand the implications of legislative mandates, role delineation, and the importance of documentation on contemporary practice. Prerequisite(s): OT 321 and OT 323.

OT 414. Children & Youth II. 4 Hours.

This is the second of two 4 courses covering the foundations of contemporary ethical family-centered occupational therapy practice for children and youth. This course focuses on young children through the period of youth and adolescence as well as their families. Students apply theoretical concepts from developmental and occupation based models to understand the impact of client factors on occupational engagement and performance. The course utilizes client-centered assessments and outcome measures used in clinical pediatric practice. It also emphasizes critical thinking as students develop meaningful interventions and identify outcomes in a range of contexts and environments in support of occupational engagement. Finally, the class explores the implications of legislative mandates, role delineation, and the importance of documentation on contemporary practice. Prerequisite(s): OT 413.

OT 440. Mental Health I. 4 Hours.

This course examines the psychological and social aspects of mental health functioning as it impacts occupational performance. Students investigate the continuum of health and recovery with an emphasis on supporting client’s successful engagement in meaningful roles and occupations across practice areas, client populations, contexts and environments. Client-centered evaluation and intervention emphasize practical application of theoretical concepts, while evidenced-based critical thinking guides clinical reasoning and decision-making throughout the course. Prerequisite(s): OT 330 and OT 331.

OT 441. Mental Health II. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on approaches to group intervention emphasizing meaningful occupational-based participation to support engagement in a variety of contexts and environments. Included are techniques for starting, maintaining, and terminating groups, ways to capitalize on the therapeutic advantages that groups offer, and exploration of group dynamics and leadership skills. Students use principles of needs assessment, group intervention planning and implementation, along with theory and research evidence, to design and co-lead client-centered occupation based groups with children, adults and older adults. Prerequisite(s): OT 440.

OT 449. Rehabilitation & Participation I. 4 Hours.

This course uses clinical reasoning to examine adult clinical conditions and their impact on occupational engagement. It includes evaluation and intervention focusing on occupational performance and meaningful participation. There is an emphasis on evidence-based, client-centered contemporary best practice. The laboratory portion of the course includes active learning and opportunities to apply entry level practice skills. Prerequisite(s): OT 300 and OT 330 and OT 331.

OT 450. Rehabilitation and Participation II. 4 Hours.

This course continues the study of adult clinical conditions and their impact on occupational engagement. Clinical reasoning is used to inform emerging critical thinking. Students have the opportunity to experience and practice evidence based intervention strategies to enhance occupational performance and meaningful participation. The laboratories focus on developing analysis and beginning synthesis of entry level practice skills. Prerequisite(s): OT 449 and OT 330 and OT 331.

OT 452. Context and Environment. 3 Hours.

In this course, students explore the impact of the physical and social conditions of the client on occupational therapy engagement. Students are also given an opportunity to explore the relationship between socio-cultural forces and the physical environment as well as their impact on meaningful participation for individuals with disabilities. Interventions include a wide range of assistive technologies (AT) and environmental adaptations that allow a person to function more fully. Finally students have the opportunity to identify social and environmental barriers to inclusion in the community and identify strategies to transform these barriers through the application of leadership principles. Prerequisite(s): OT 449.

OT 460. Professional Integration B: Service Delivery and Management. 1 Hour.

This is the second of three professional integration courses. Through this course, students demonstrate emerging application and integration of classroom didactic concepts in a clinical or community setting. Students also apply knowledge and skills from entry-level practice courses to promote occupational engagement within and across diverse contexts and environments with an emphasis on the programmatic aspects of service delivery. Prerequisite(s): OT 361.

OT 461. Professional Integration C: Professional Resp & Leadership. 1 Hour.

This is the third of three professional integration courses. In this course, students demonstrate advanced-beginner application and integration of classroom didactic concepts in a clinical or community setting. Students also apply emerging clinical reasoning and skills from practice courses to promote occupational engagement within and across diverse contexts and environments. The course emphasizes roles and responsibilities related to the development of personal and professional leadership. Prerequisite(s): OT 460.

OT 470. Research & Evidence-based Practice I. 3 Hours.

This is the first in a three course series that will use research to foster evidence-based critical thinking and clinical reasoning. This course will focus on critical analysis of quantitative and qualitative research literature with the goal of guiding students to become informed consumers of research to guide their clinic practice. The contribution of research to the continued development of a professional body of knowledge will be emphasized. Experience locating and evaluating literature, developing a research question, and proposing an appropriate sample, research design, measurement and data analysis will reinforce development of the skills necessary to translate evidence to practice in the clinic. Prerequisite(s): (MS 132 and SC 224) or ( College Level=Grad Freshman or College Level=Grad Sophomore or College Level=Grad Junior or College Level=Grad Senior).

OT 471. Research & Evidence-based Practice II. 3 Hours.

This is the second in a three course series that will use research to foster evidence-based critical thinking and clinical reasoning. This course will build on the process of developing informed consumers of research through experiential engagement in the research process and implementation of a research methodology. Prerequisite(s): OT 470.

OT 499. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

This course of variable content will provide students with the opportunity to explore selected topics in occupational therapy under the guidance of occupational therapy faculty.

OT 561. Level Two Fieldwork IIA. 6 Hours.

The goal of Level II Fieldwork is to develop competent, entry-level, generalist occupational therapists under the supervision of a qualified occupational therapist. In this first Level II fieldwork course, students have the opportunity to integrate classroom, service-learning, laboratory, and fieldwork knowledge and skills while applying the OT process in an in-depth occupational therapy service provision experience. Prerequisite(s): OT 414 and OT 441 and OT 450 and OT 461.

OT 562. Level Two Fieldwork IIB. 6 Hours.

The goal of Level II Fieldwork is to further develop competent, entry-level, generalist occupational therapists under the supervision of a qualified occupational therapist. In this second Level II Fieldwork course, students have the opportunity to integrate advanced didactic content with knowledge and skills from previous fieldwork experiences. This final clinical experience requires students to demonstrate evidence-based clinical reasoning and emerging critical thinking, while emphasizing occupational engagement in the context of an in-depth occupational therapy service provision experience. Prerequisite(s): OT 580 and OT 581 and OT 582.

OT 563. Clinical Integration: Research and Evidence-based Practice. 2 Hours.

This course will provide an opportunity for students to process and integrate evidence-based critical thinking and reasoning with clinical experience. Students will demonstrate self-reflection regarding their own professional and personal growth over the course of their academic and clinical professional preparation. We will revisit concepts related to healthcare leadership skills and values, as well as reinforce supports to facilitate the transition to entry-level clinical practitioner and scholar. Prerequisite(s): OT 561 and OT 562.

OT 570. Seminar: Research & Evidence-based Practice III. 3 Hours.

This is the third in a three course series that will use research to foster evidence-based critical thinking and clinical reasoning. Building on the project from the previous semester students will prepare a professional written report and a formal scientific oral presentation of findings or outcome. The importance of research to building a professional body of knowledge will be revisited as students are required to highlight the application of their findings to occupational therapy. Furthermore the clinical application of their findings will reinforce the use of evidence to guide clinical thinking and reasoning. Prerequisite(s): OT 471.

OT 580. Integrative Health II: Spirituality. 2 Hours.

This is the second of two courses focusing on integrative health, which considers the dynamic interaction between mind, body, spirit and community. This course expands on concepts of wellness and spirituality previously introduced and also integrates the contribution of culture to well-being and occupational engagement. Students develop increased awareness of the influence of patients' values, beliefs, culture, and spiritual traditions on healthcare practices. There is an emphasis on the interplay between integrative health, well-being, quality of life and meaningful participation. Prerequisite(s): OT 380.

OT 581. Upper Extremity: Research and Evidence-Based Practice. 3 Hours.

This course explores common upper extremity/hand injuries and evidence-based treatment interventions in support of client engagement in meaningful occupations. It involves a review of anatomy, clinical evaluation of the upper extremity/hand, and intervention appropriate to each injury. Through a combination of lecture and active experiential learning with a strong emphasis on participation, discussion, and problem solving, students develop critical thinking and clinical reasoning. Students are also expected to identify, palpate and perform learned techniques on each other and demonstrate competency and mastery of content. This course emphasizes hands-on participation with demonstrations of proficiencies in manual muscle, range of motion, and provocative testing.

OT 582. Neurorehabilitation: Research & Evidence-Based Practice. 3 Hours.

This course explores the impact of central and peripheral neurologically based conditions on performance skills supporting occupational engagement. Students will have the opportunity to explore both formal and informal assessments used in the evaluation of cognitive, perceptual, communication, and motor dysfunction. Evidence based interventions and rehabilitative approaches for working with clients who have experienced neurologically based conditions will be explored. Integration of previous foundation content with intervention content will require demonstration of emerging critical thinking and clinical reasoning. Students will be provided with learning activities including lecture, group activities, role playing, and experiential learning.

OT 583. Work & Industry: Research and Evidence-Based Practice. 3 Hours.

This course provides a general overview of basic ergonomic principles and environmental adaptations in the home and work environment. It will describe symptomatology and interventions to promote meaningful engagement in and performance of work related occupations. It emphasizes a client-centered approach and client worldview to develop treatment plans, reflecting current evidence-based literature and best practice concepts. The course puts a strong emphasis on the use of narratives, or patient stories, in the belief that care of the sick and disabled unfolds in stories, and the effective practice of healthcare requires the ability to recognize, absorb, interpret, and act on the stories and experiences of others, and occupational therapy practiced with narrative competence is a model for humane and effective treatment. Prerequisite(s): OT 450.

OT 599. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

This course of variable content will provide students with the opportunity to explore selected topics in occupational therapy under the guidance of occupational therapy faculty.