B.S. Physical Education (K-12)

Features of the Program

Husson's Physical Education major is designed to prepare graduates to become certified to teach students in schools as well as recreational settings. Through a series of health/wellness, sports, dance, and fitness classes, the program cultivates the conceptual knowledge and performance skills applied during clinical experiences with diverse student populations. Habits of a healthy lifestyle are encouraged. Pre-service teachers are equipped with strategies for working with the K-12 span of developmental capabilities, including individuals with identified needs. Students completing this program will be eligible to be conditionally certified in Health Education. No freshmen will be admitted to the Physical Education program after the fall of 2017. Transfer students will be considered for acceptance to the Physical Education program on an individual basis. 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education

General Education Courses
EH 123Rhetoric and Composition I3
EH 124Rhetoric and Composition II3
EH 200Approaches to Literature3
HE 111The Husson Experience ***1
MS 141Contemporary College Algebra4
MS 115Quantitative Literacy3
PH 110Introduction to Ethics3
PY 111General Psychology3
PY 141Human Growth and Development3
SC 101Introduction to Nutrition3
SC 104Organismal Biology3
SC 120
SL 120
Functional Anatomy and Physiology
and Functional Anatomy and Physiology Lab
4
SC 330Exercise Physiology3
SC 360Biomechanics & Kinesiology in Human Performance3
SC 410Motor Learning in Human Performance3
SM 304Principles of Sports Medicine3
Fine Arts Elective3
Foreign LangCulture and Conversation Elective3
History Global Elective3
Professional Courses
ED 201Phil Foundations of Education (Clinical Placement)3
ED 202Methods of Teaching Outdoor and Adventure Education3
ED 203Clinical Experience0
ED 208Skills Activities3
ED 213Curriculum and Evaluation in Health and Physical Education3
ED 222Personal Health & Fitness3
ED 240History and Philosophy of Physical Education3
ED 243Team Sports/Tech & Strategies3
ED 302
ED 423
Adapted and Developmentally-Appropriate Physical Education
and PE/Health Practicum III
4
ED 307Technology in Education3
ED 321Educating Exceptional Students3
ED 389Educational Psychology3
ED 410Assessment in Health and Physical Education3
ED 444Individual Sports & Lifetime Activities3
ED 446
ED 223
Elementary P.E. Methods
and PE/Health Practicum I
4
ED 447
ED 323
Secondary P.E. Methods
and PE/Health Practicum II
4
ED 450Student Teaching/Seminar in Teaching15
PY 322Diversity & Multiculturalism3
ED 350Teaching Elementary and Secondary Health Education3
Total Hours126
***

Credit may not be required for degree completion. 

Suggested Course Sequence

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ED 2403PY 1113
HE 1111MS 1153
History Global Elective3ED 2223
SC 1043ED 2013
EH 1233ED 2030
MS 1414EH 1243
 17 15
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ED 2133ED 2433
SC 1013SL 1201
ED 2083SC 1203
Foreign Cult. & Conv. Elect.3PY 1413
ED 3213EH 2003
 SC 4103
 15 16
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ED 2023SM 3043
ED 4463ED 3893
SC 3303ED 3231
PH 1103ED 4103
PY 3223ED 4473
ED 2231SC 3603
 16 16
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ED 3503ED 45015
ED 3023 
ED 4443 
Fine Arts Elective3 
ED 4231 
ED 3073 
 16 15
Total Hours: 126

Courses

ED 201. Phil Foundations of Education. 3 Hours.

An integral component for all education majors, this course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the rewarding, yet challenging, teaching profession. Students broadly explore an overview of the educational field and its philosophical, political, legal, and social foundations. Current issues impacting education in a changing society will be examined. Coursework is intended to stimulate thoughtful reflection as students use information to develop their own beliefs concerning educational issues. Education Students will complete their first 30 hour clinical (ED 203) as part of this course. Students in other majors are not required to complete the Clinical Experience.

ED 202. Methods of Teaching Outdoor and Adventure Education. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to expose students to a variety of outdoor experiences with an emphasis on student participation in the activities. Students will also explore ways to incorporate outdoor in a variety of educational settings. Mastery of certain skills and the methodology employed in presenting these skills will be central to the course. Examples of the types of activities that may be covered through the course include canoeing, hiking, mountain biking, orienteering, camping skills, outdoor games, and an introduction to winter sports.

ED 203. Clinical Experience. 0 Hours.

All Education students are required to complete one 30 clock-hour block of a non-credit clinical observation experience in K-12 schools. This experience is completed as part of ED 201 Philosophical Foundations of Education and is designed to allow students to better understand the profession by observing experienced teachers in classroom settings. Through this experience, future educators will gain an appreciation of what happens “behind the scenes” in schools and other professional settings. Prerequisite(s): ED 201.

ED 204. Classroom Management. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to explore classroom management practices in educational settings. The course is taken concurrently with an education practicum so students will be able to observe and implement the techniques of practicing teachers in the areas of behavior modification, social skills training, and classroom management structures. Prerequisite(s): ED 201.

ED 208. Skills Activities. 3 Hours.

This course explores the application of learning and performance of motor skills in a variety of activities. Dance, racquet sports, aquatics and track/field will be participatory and allow students to gain experiential opportunities with instruction, drill progression, strategies, equipment and facility preparation and reflection. Instructor and peer feedback will enhance this class, and allow tactical decision-making competencies.

ED 213. Curriculum and Evaluation in Health and Physical Education. 3 Hours.

This course introduces Health and Physical Education majors to curriculum design and policy. Students will explore how to create, design, organize and evaluate a K-12 Health or Physical Education curriculum. Students will also learn how such a curriculum would be implemented and be expected to relate how a curriculum map ensures that all appropriate Maine Learning Results and grade level competencies are included. This course addresses multiple outcomes relating to the curriculum found in InTASC.

ED 215. Teaching Elementary Health Education. 3 Hours.

This course covers the foundation for healthy habits and active lifestyles which are introduced and reinforced during the K-8 experience. Topics that build both self-esteem and character, along with experiential health and physical activities will be examined. The American Association for Health Education and the Maine Learning Results will be used in conjunction with curriculum guides as students design lessons and units in health education.

ED 222. Personal Health & Fitness. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce the health and physical education student to a core of competences to employ at the K-12 teaching levels. Several health topics will be covered including personal fitness, mental health, stress management, nutrition and diet, tobacco, and cardiovascular disease, as well as a variety of fitness and healthy experiences with an emphasis on actual participation in the activities.

ED 223. PE/Health Practicum I. 1 Hour.

The Practicum courses are one credit offerings designed to provide field experience for students enrolled in the three ED methods courses associated with their major. They are in the areas of Elementary, Secondary and Adaptive PE/Health. In most cases, the field experience will be chosen to coincide with the methods course in which the student is enrolled. The student will log at least 30 hours in a placement, most often within a school, secured by the clinical placement supervisor. This course is taken by physical education majors concurrently with ED 446. Prerequisite(s): ED 203.

ED 231. Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for students in the elementary/secondary education K – 12 programs. It is a general methods course for assessment, curriculum design, development and methods of instruction. This course focuses on the "what to teach", "how to teach", and “planning the context for teaching and learning” with the goal of providing an integrated approach in instruction. Such an integrated approach involves interventions (accommodations and modifications) in the design of instruction to teach all learners. This course ensures that pre-service teachers gain a broad knowledge in the methods of instruction as well as supporting diversity in the classroom. The course presents comprehensive and balanced coverage of all aspects of assessment relevant to classroom teachers. Prerequisite(s): ED 201.

ED 240. History and Philosophy of Physical Education. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the philosophical and historical principles of health and physical education. It will include an historical overview of these education disciplines and cover current day principles. This course also offers an opportunity for critical examination of both theory and practice in the professions of health and physical education, wellness, sport and fitness.

ED 243. Team Sports/Tech & Strategies. 3 Hours.

Formal physical education, recreational and camp settings include games and strategies. It is the strategies component that enhances participation. Understanding game strategy promotes application of techniques and skills. Games research has also shown that the more strategy participants understand, the greater the chance of participation and satisfaction (Mitchell, S.). Thus tactical problem solving and teaching strategies will be the points of emphasis within a variety of invasion, net/wall, target, and striking/fielding games. Students will have the opportunity to learn skills, drills, techniques and strategies, and practice planning and teaching sport lessons during class.

ED 299. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer advanced courses in education that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty.

ED 302. Adapted and Developmentally-Appropriate Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Adapted and developmentally appropriate physical education programs are the art and science of developing, implementing, and monitoring carefully designed instructional programs to meet the unique needs of individuals. Teaching approaches are both task-specific and developmental in nature and the course is designed to enable teachers to successfully address a range of specific needs in the physical education setting. This course is based on authentic and comprehensive assessments to give participants skills necessary for a lifetime of leisure, recreation, and sport experiences to enhance physical fitness, participation and wellness. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 213 and (ED 232 or ED 447).

ED 307. Technology in Education. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the history and structure of the field of instructional technology, with an emphasis on integrating as an educational tool. Students will experience creative skills and confidence necessary to use mainstream and emerging hardware and software available in most school settings. Prerequisite(s): ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 310. Educational Practicum I. 1 Hour.

ED 310 Education Practicum is the first classroom experience for university students considering the profession of teaching by spending time in an assigned classroom, students will shift their perspective from that of a student to that of a teacher. This experience is designed, in part, to provide students with the opportunity to interact with a mentor teacher and pupils in a classroom setting. The extent of involvement will depend on the needs of the teacher, the organization of the classroom, and the stage of development of the practicum student. This course is viewed as a shared professional responsibility among teachers, administrators, and Husson faculty to provide a professional classroom experience for participating students. Prerequisite(s): ED 203.

ED 314. Assessment Practices. 3 Hours.

Presents comprehensive and balanced coverage of all aspects of assessment relevant to classroom teachers. Students learn to construct and use paper-and-pencil, alternative, and standardized assessments; analyze objectives; use grading systems; and judge assessment quality.

ED 316. Methods in Science. 3 Hours.

Science education is presented with a constructivist approach. Students become familiar with curricular content, methodology, and instructional planning that stimulates scientific interest and concept formation. Resources for science education will be collected for future. With a constructivist approach in mind, techniques for assessing student inquiry processes are explored. Students also learn ways to use instructional and design technology to enhance lessons. Prerequisite(s): ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 317. Methods in Secondary Science. 3 Hours.

This course offers a hands-on, practical approach that introduces students to a variety of strategies they can directly implement upon entering a position as a 7-12 teacher of science. Concentrating on practical application rather than theoretical implications, students will refine and add to their repertoire of teaching strategies. We will begin by learning how differentiating activities, based upon learning styles and ability, can enhance the learning of each student in a classroom. Students will be engaged in the direct completion of project-based learning in the form of laboratory experiences, lesson building, and cooperative tasks. Direct implementation of current science project-based pedagogy will be the emphasis. Students will apply their understanding of the new methods by creating a series of mini-lessons, typical lessons, and projects that are reflective of their understanding. Teaching science is not just about creating lesson plans and writing labs – it is also about engaging students, maintaining their interested in science and devise a number of ways to motivate them to complete their learning tasks and raise their aspirations. Many classes will begin with sample laboratory experiences and will then progress forward to introduce, explain, and model different methods for instruction, questioning, and assessment; all within the context of product-based inquiry. The course will seek to help pre- service teachers to develop an understanding and appreciation of science. This will hopefully make an impression upon students to acquire knowledge, attitudes, and skills essential to science literacy. Prerequisite(s): ED 231 and ED 204.

ED 318. Teaching Students With Special Needs. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide Career and Technical Education (CTE) teachers, educational technicians and teachers-in-training the necessary skills to develop learning environments where all special needs students can be successful. It is built upon the foundations of current legislation, appropriate curricula, assessment modifications and individualized instruction using successful teaching strategies to provide improved levels of success for students with special needs.

ED 319. Methods in Secondary English. 3 Hours.

In this course students learn how to teach reading and writing genres with secondary students. We explore strategies and processes in the English Language Arts while connecting it to literacy across the curriculum. We explore literacy and technology, accommodations and differentiated learning, assessment, selection of literature to serve purposes for reading and writing, issues in the secondary classroom, and models of instruction. We will inquire into certain questions, such as, What methods work best with adolescents? How does technology fit into the classroom? Why is reflection a big deal? How does the English teacher address reading and writing in the content areas? What does being an English teacher mean? You will be both a student in the course, participating in practices, and a teacher, designing and implementing learning sequences. The course objectives address the Common Core, InTASC, and ISTE NETs standards. Prerequisite(s): ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 320. Education Practicum II. 1 Hour.

Education Practica provide classroom experience for university students thinking of becoming teachers. By spending time in an assigned classroom students will shift their perspective from that of a student to that of a teacher. These experiences should be viewed as pre-student teaching opportunities and are designed, in part, to provide university students with the opportunity to interact with a mentor teacher and students in a classroom setting. The extent of involvement with the mentor teacher will depend on his or her needs, the organization of the classroom, and the stage of development of the practicum student. Practicum students have varied backgrounds and experiences. These strengths and experiences should be utilized to enrich the learning opportunities for the students in the classroom and the practicum student. This program is a shared professional responsibility among teachers, administrators, and Husson faculty to provide a professional classroom experience for university students seeking a career in teaching. Prerequisite(s): ED 203.

ED 321. Educating Exceptional Students. 3 Hours.

Prepares classroom teachers to successfully educate students with disabilities within the regular classroom setting. While the primary focus is to manage the instructional requirements of students with disabilities, the course incorporates the legal and ethical standards for mainstreaming and the roles of parent advocacy and support groups. Additionally, students become familiar with instructional issues represented by students from culturally, ethnically, and socio-economically diverse populations. Course content also explores the importance of enhancing educational opportunities of diverse learners via procedural due process, diagnostic practices, and development of professional and parent collaboration.

ED 323. PE/Health Practicum II. 1 Hour.

The Practicum courses are one credit courses designed to provide field experience for students enrolled in the three ED methods courses associated with their major. These are in the areas of Elementary, Secondary and Adaptive PE/Health. In most cases, the field experience will be chosen to coincide with the methods course in which the student is enrolled. The student will log at least 30 hours in a placement secured by the clinical placement supervisor. In most cases, this will be a school setting. Students will be responsible for arranging their own schedule with their cooperating teacher. The hours logged should be recorded over a period of 10-12 weeks and should be on a regular schedule. In addition to the hours recorded in the placement, students will be expected to attend 3-4 meetings with the field supervisor and/or placement supervisor during the course of the semester. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 213 and ED 203.

ED 324. Young Adult Literature. 3 Hours.

This course, organized by trends in young adult literature, offers participants an opportunity to learn more about the young adult novel and other genres, how to select appropriate, high-quality books, how to incorporate it into a traditional classic-based classroom, and how to make the reading of young adult novels relevant to students' lives. Through reading, discussing, and writing about books in different genres, students explore issues and trends including appropriateness in the classroom, close reading strategies, issues of diverse audiences and subject matter, the young adult and the canon, and literary theory such as reader response. Participants select books of their interest, read class books, and make connections to readings from the professional literature. The course integrates the Common Core and InTASC standards for teachers. It will help teachers find practical ways to integrate quality young adult novels into their curriculum, integrating teaching of literature and content areas, and making literature more accessible for their students. Prerequisite(s): ED 201.

ED 325. Brain Gym. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to educational kinesiology and an overview of Brain Gym movements. Students will also learn a multi-step implementation process for increasing concentration, participation and problem-solving in the classroom. The highly interactive course design encourages the integration of Brain Gym techniques throughout the learning process.

ED 328. Children's Literature. 3 Hours.

This survey course provides an overview of children’s literature, its genres, authors, ideas for instruction and response, criteria of selection, children’s development, and the teacher as reader. Students will explore ways to bring children to diverse, contemporary children’s literature in the language arts and content areas while at the same time becoming more experienced, insightful, and informed readers of children’s literature. Prerequisite(s): ED 201.

ED 330. Substance Abuse and Prevention. 3 Hours.

Society faces abuse challenges as a result of domestic and global sources of addictive substances. This course offers an opportunity for critical examination of both theory and practice as students analyze available data on substances such as nicotine, caffeine, alcohol, over the counter drugs, prescriptive drugs and illegal drugs. Students also examine the role family, friends, education, the media and/or marketing may play in the decision-making process of individuals. Drug prevention programs and rehabilitative programs are reviewed with video input from professionals. Course content is drawn from videos, interviews, research, case analysis, projects and online discussion. These serve as reflective tools to build the student's knowledge.

ED 332. Methods in Teaching Writing in the Schools. 3 Hours.

This course is based on the belief that teachers of writing at any grade level teach with greater understanding when they are active writers themselves and when their writing has a place and function in the world. Participants practice in instruction that draws on research on teaching writing, in assessment of writing, and in the teaching of the writing process approach, conducting conferences, modeling, and writing in the content areas with applications in the classroom. Adapting instruction to the development of writers is included. Participants focus on how they, as teachers, solve problems in writing so they support young writers develop their writing. Strategies of instruction are explored through focused lessons addressing Common Core standards and demonstrated during our sessions. Integration of practicum experience and application of course principles and strategies are expected. Prerequisite(s): ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 350. Teaching Elementary and Secondary Health Education. 3 Hours.

This course can help prepare elementary and secondary level health educators with information, classroom management techniques, instructional strategies and appropriate curriculum, as well as provide opportunites for teaching health lessons to peers with peer feedback. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 213.

ED 352. Emerging Trends In Career and Technical Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the participant an overview of current events, issues, and policies aligned to Career and Technical Education (CTE) from a National, regional, and local perspective. The design of the course will ask students to be reflective about their school, classroom, and personal challenges regarding their involvement in Career and Technical Education.

ED 380. Curriculum-based Instruction for the CTE Classroom and Shop. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on brain-based learning, strategies to develop student skills as readers, writers, and thinkers, Quadrant D lesson planning, gradual release of responsibility model, and questioning techniques.

ED 381. Introduction to Effective Classroom Management. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the participant an overview of current events, issues, and policies aligned to Career and Technical Education (CTE) from a National, regional, and local perspective. The design of the course will ask students to be reflective about their school, classroom, and personal challenges regarding their involvement in Career and Technical Education.

ED 382. Introduction to CTE Classroom Teaching. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the participant an overview of current events, issues, and policies aligned to Career and Technical Education (CTE) from a National, regional, and local perspective. The design of the course will ask students to be reflective about their school, classroom, and personal challenges regarding their involvement in Career and Technical Education.

ED 383. E-Portfolio for Teachers. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the participant an overview of current events, issues, and policies aligned to Career and Technical Education (CTE) from a National, regional, and local perspective. The design of the course will ask students to be reflective about their school, classroom, and personal challenges regarding their involvement in Career and Technical Education.

ED 389. Educational Psychology. 3 Hours.

The course examines the educational perspectives of K-12 students. Students in the course will incorporate the principles of educational psychology in a variety of classroom settings and decision-making processes. Authentic case studies will be used to analyze the practical applications of these principles in teaching and learning situations. Theories, principles, and issues investigated in this course are cognitive, linguistic, personal, social, emotional & moral development, and students with special needs. There will be an in depth study of how students learn in the areas of cognitive learning process, construction of knowledge, behavior views of learning, social cognitive learning and motivation. Instructional processes will be examined in relation to instructional strategies, student interactions, and learning assessment. This is a third year course. Students will demonstrate their understanding by identifying the principles of educational psychology during visits to their assigned schools. Prerequisite(s): PY 111.

ED 404. Methods in Reading. 3 Hours.

This course integrates different perspectives on reading instruction as participants survey instructional approaches and informal reading assessments to support instruction in a balanced literacy program appropriate for the K-8 classroom. Participants examine and apply methods of developmental literacy. They also practice research-based methods that address different aspects of reading and different content areas. In their practice they create and implement lessons that support reading skills and strategies, design instruction tailored to different readers, and integrate understanding of children’s literature and other reading resources in the classroom. Methods are applied in the practicum. Students integrate the Maine Learning Results and Common Core into their practice and address the professional standards of certification. Outcomes for the course include a portfolio of methods, approaches, and lessons in reading. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 408. Methods in Language Arts. 3 Hours.

This course, integrated with the other literacy courses in the elementary education program, introduces students to the instructional practices of the interrelated language art components of listening, talking, reading, writing, viewing, and representing appropriate for K-8 classrooms. Students survey methods of informal assessments, apply methods and approaches to teaching other content areas, practice the writers’ workshop, integrate the Maine Learning Results, Common Core, and instructional approaches, and relate their learning and practice to the professional standards for teaching certification. Among the outcomes are a portfolio of instructional practices, an integrated thematic unit of instruction, and products of the writers' workshop. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 409. Methods in Mathematics. 3 Hours.

This course introduces mathematic concepts and problem solving strategies along with real-world applications. Methods emphasize an active learning process in which children engage in guided discovery and problem solving opportunities. Teachers learn to coach youngsters to reflect on their process to clarify ideas for themselves and to share their thoughts with others. Models of engaged learning scenarios will be developed and discussed. Prerequisite(s): ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 410. Assessment in Health and Physical Education. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course will be on measurement and assessment of achievement. Multiple practice opportunities will be provided in designing and implementing measurement/evaluation methods and tests recognizing that the ultimate purpose is to enhance the decision-making process so improvement can be made (Baumgartner, 2007). Both the classroom and lab will be utilized to implement health and physical education tests and evaluation. Students gain skills using assessments within physical education and health education content. Tools for assessing the levels of competency are utilized at each elementary and secondary grade level. Teacher preparation students will apply these assessment tools to current programs.

ED 411. CTE Assessment I. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to the use of formative, summative and diagnostic assessments. Specific topics will include the appropriate use and design of certification tests as well as reading and math assessments.

ED 415. Methods in Social Studies. 3 Hours.

Methods in teaching Social Studies provides students with an overview of the field of Social Studies, selected issues in the field, and best practice strategies for teaching social studies in the K - 8 classroom. Students will identify important social studies knowledge, skills, and dispositions; investigate how students learn most effectively; and apply this new learning to lesson/unit design and instruction. Curriculum will be aligned to both national and state standards for both social studies and literacy. Prerequisite(s): ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 419. Mentoring Children and Youth. 3 Hours.

Through experience in this course, students will develop a mentoring relationship with either an elementary or middle school student. Mentoring can be an intense process where a positive, adult role model is matched with a youngster who needs assistance with academic efforts and social/behavior issues. This course will provide insight to many issues that surround a youngster's life. Issues and topics on poverty and education, cross-cultural competencies, tutoring skills, goal setting and violence in schools and society will be addressed.

ED 420. Physical Activity Programming in Youth Development. 3 Hours.

This class will provide a philosophical and practical base for working in youth development programs. This class will discuss the history of youth development programming, the current trends in youth development and the role of physical activity as a tool to better serve youth. This class will focus on programs that serve youth through physical activity, with special emphasis on goals of personal and social responsibility.

ED 421. Evaluating Youth Development Programs. 3 Hours.

Students will become aware of various models for evaluating youth development programs, and become familiar with the rationale and various assumptions for evaluating youth development programs. Students will also understand the various data sources for evaluating youth development programs, and be knowledgeable of the various ways to analyze, interpret, and disseminate data collected in the evaluation process.

ED 422. Educational Studies. 6 Hours.

ED 422 is the capstone experience for education students seeking future employment in a setting other than a traditional classroom. The 90-hour internship is spread over a minimum of twelve weeks and allows students to gain practical experience working with staff, learners, and other members of an agency or organization in a community setting (e.g. municipal recreations departments, public libraries, children's museums, social service agencies, etc.) During this field experience, students learn about the organization or agency, study the implementation and evaluation of its programming, and design a related project to contribute to the site. The connected on-campus class will provide an opportunity for students to share their experiences and provide peer feedback.

ED 423. PE/Health Practicum III. 1 Hour.

One credit practicum courses are designed to provide field experience for students enrolled in the three ED methods courses associated with their major. These are in the areas of Elementary, Secondary and Adaptive PE/Health. In most cases, the field experience will be chosen to coincide with the methods course in which the student is enrolled. The student will log at least 30 hours in a placement secured by the clinical placement supervisor. In most cases, this will be a school setting. Students will be responsible for arranging their own schedule with their cooperating teacher. The hours logged should be recorded over a period of 10-12 weeks and should be on a regular schedule. In addition to the hours recorded in the placement, students will be expected to attend 3-4 meetings with the field supervisor and/or placement supervisor during the course of the semester. Prerequisite(s): ED 203.

ED 430. Educational Practicum III. 1 Hour.

Education practica provide classroom experiences for future teachers. These experiences are designed, in part, to provide students with the opportunity to interact with a mentor teacher (MT) and pupils in the classroom setting. The extent of involvement with an MT will depend on the needs of the teacher, the organization of the classroom, and the stage of development of the practicum student. Strengths and experiences gained from practica should enrich the learning in the classroom. Prerequisite(s): ED 203.

ED 440. Disease Prevention & Health Promotion. 3 Hours.

In this course, core competencies regarding disease prevention and health promotion will be obtained, practiced and employed. Students will build upon personal health and wellness skills, and incorporate diverse perspectives in designing and implementing a Health Promotion program.

ED 441. Community Health. 3 Hours.

Community Health encompasses the topics of public health issues, policies and community health services across the lifespan. Students also study global health issues, community health issues and the impact of environment, geographic location and socio-economic status on human health, as well as public policies and health services. In this course, students will research and present a community health education and picture project.

ED 444. Individual Sports & Lifetime Activities. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide an informational and experiential overview of pursuits that may be classified as individual sports and lifetime activities. Attention will be paid to what place these activities may have in schools, recreational programs and other programs associated with youth development and learning. The role of lifetime fitness and health will be discussed and explored.

ED 445. Comprehensive School Health. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the need for comprehensive school health education for students and society. Students will examine the role of the health educator as coordinator of the school health program. National Health Standards will guide the curricula as students learn about policies, procedures and activities designed to promote K-12 healthy living.

ED 446. Elementary P.E. Methods. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to teach prospective physical education teachers the concepts necessary to become an effective teacher. The class will study classroom management, planning, teaching instruction, student feedback and assessment. Students will have the opportunity to practice planning and teaching techniques during the concurrent practicum ED 323 PE/Health Practicum II. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 213.

ED 447. Secondary P.E. Methods. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to teach prospective physical education teachers the concepts necessary to become an effective teacher. The class will study classroom management, planning, teaching instruction, student feedback and assessment. Students will have the opportunity to practice planning and teaching techniques by conducting lessons during the attached practicum experience. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 213.

ED 450. Student Teaching/Seminar in Teaching. 15 Hours.

ED 450 is the culminating experience of the Husson Teacher Education Program and occurs after all other coursework and requirements have been completed. It has two required concurrent sections: a sixteen-week student teaching field placement and a weekly capstone seminar in teaching. This dual approach is designed to integrate pedagogy and professional practice to ensure that clear connections are made by student teachers as they strive to become effective educators. The InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards and the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers NETS-T provide the framework for both the student teaching section and the seminar. ED 450 is viewed as a collaborative undertaking among students, instructors, and supervising teachers.

ED 499. Topic/. 1-3 Hour.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer advanced courses in education that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty.

ED 600. Research Methods in Business and Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for graduate students who have little or no formal preparation in those areas of research and problem-solving essential for a comprehensive study of business and education at the graduate level. Emphasis is placed on the identification of common problem types and the selection and use of appropriate methods of analysis (primarily statistical in nature).

ED 601. Theoretical Foundations of Learning. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced study of the application of the principles of educational theory and psychology in teaching students PK–12. Theories, principles, and issues investigated in this course include cognitive, linguistic, personal, social, emotional and moral development, the role of educational theory in practice, and students with special needs. Students in the course will incorporate the principles of educational psychology and an array of theoretical frameworks in a variety of classroom settings and decision-making processes. Authentic case studies will be used to analyze the practical applications of these principles in teaching and learning situations. The course includes an in-depth study in the areas of cognitive process, construction of knowledge, behaviorists’ views of learning, social cognition, and motivation. Students will conduct analyses of learning theories in light of this knowledge. Instructional processes will be examined in relation to instructional strategies, student interactions, and learning assessment. Emphasis will be on the development of successful academic and social interventions using an inquiry-based approach. Students will demonstrate their understanding by identifying the principles of educational psychology and learning theory in their school setting.

ED 603. Advanced Curriculum and Instruction. 3 Hours.

This graduate level core course is designed to enhance student understanding of curriculum content, design, policy, and instructional strategies through the application of curriculum theory, assessment and technology. Students acquire skills in planning the context for learning utilizing authentic experiences for diverse populations and the promotion of successful academic and social interventions using an inquiry-based approach. Identification and implementation of research-based instructional strategies are examined. Curricula are analyzed using an integrated approach to instruction that promotes grade level competency. Students demonstrate curricula mapping in accordance with Maine standards.

ED 701. Introduction to School Guidance Counseling. 3 Hours.

This course will survey the philosophy, objectives, principles and program of comprehensive developmental school guidance programs at the K-12 level. The course will focus on National and State Models of School Counseling.

ED 702. Advanced Assessment Practices. 3 Hours.

In this advanced assessment course, students build upon their understanding of current trends, issues, and practices in assessment. This core course in the Master of Education program is conducted in a seminar format; students participate in whole group and small group discussions related to assigned readings, current practices, and their own experiences in assessment. Students are expected to synthesize information from multiple sources, analyze and apply applicable theories to assessment practices, and evaluate embedded and programmatic assessments. Students analyze the strengths of various assessment techniques based on reliability statistics, and evaluate arguments of validity. Students also produce recommendations and interventions based on assessment findings. Students create curriculum maps, assessment maps, objective assessments, performance assessments, and programmatic assessments as expected artifacts of learning, and utilize course projects to address their own K-12 or post-secondary assessment needs.

ED 705. The Changing Role of the School Counselor. 3 Hours.

This course will review the historical and philosophical bases for school counseling programs, explore traditional roles for the school counselor, and examine the ethical and legal responsibilities of school guidance counselors. Focus will be given to recent applications of contemporary theories in educational settings as well as the role of the counselor in assisting all students in academic, career, and personal/social domains.

ED 706. STEM in the Classroom. 3 Hours.

This course provides the foundations of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education disciplines based upon the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the Math and ELA Common Core Standards. The approach used will be a multi-disciplinary experiential learning method that will engage participants in scientific and mathematical practices that can be directly applied in the classroom to help learners make connections across curricula. Core topics include STEM pedagogy, the nature of STEM education disciplines, integrative STEM learning, and deepening knowledge within the STEM disciplines. Course objectives are grounded in the the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) Model Core Teaching Standards and the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T).

ED 707. Literacy Across the Curriculum. 3 Hours.

This advanced course explores how literacy, broadly defined as reading, writing, talking, viewing, representing, and listening, can be a tool for thinking and learning in the content areas for all PK-12 students in different school environments of a diverse and globalized society. The course provides opportunity for participants to discuss and practice inquiry-based approaches that support learning and literacy development in the content areas, while integrating technology and instruction and connecting reading and writing. The course includes the genres and texts that teachers might use in the teaching of reading for different purposes. Professional and research literature are included. The workshop/seminar format of the course is interactive and includes lectures and demonstrations as students become more knowledgeable with respect to ethical decision-making, social responsibility, and reflective practice. Class participants will serve as resources, collaborators and teachers through in-class discussions, group work, and projects.

ED 708. Advanced Classroom Management. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to assist the classroom teacher in creating a climate that is safe and conducive to learning for all students in the inclusive classroom setting. Students will expand and apply their knowledge of theory and practical strategies for classroom management and student engagement. Through inquiry based study, learners will gain increased knowledge of effective strategies to implement when dealing with challenging student behaviors. Students will gain advanced skills with which to manage the inclusive classroom and be able to more effectively engage students and parents.

ED 799. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

Selected topics are offered centering on the needs and interests of the students and the availability of expert faculty.

ED 809. Integrating Technology into Instruction. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to a variety of technologies and computer applications that can enhance teaching, assessment, and the learning process. Class sessions and projects involve critically examining the theory and practice of using technologies to augment learning. Course objectives are grounded in the the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) Model Core Teaching Standards and the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T).

ED 810. Contemporary Issues in Educational Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of formal and informal models of teacher leadership as well as the opportunity for in-depth analyses of relevant topics from the current and past centuries. Students explore emerging trends that address leadership opportunities for teachers and issues related to group dynamics, motivation, communication, ethics, and human relations. Course topics also include educator evaluation, the nationalization of standards and assessment, standards-based education, globalization, diversity, and technology. Skills and strategies for effective leadership are developed, especially those related to organizational change, ethical decision-making, and team building.

ED 868. M.Ed. Capstone. 3 Hours.

Students will complete a supervised experience , thesis, or special project in their area of interest that has been pre-approved by the department. Prerequisite(s): ED 601 and ED 603 and ED 702 and ED 706 and ED 707 and ED 708 and ED 809 and ED 810 and CO 704 and BA 600.