B.S. in Secondary Education Physical Science Concentration (7-12)

General Education Courses
EH 123Rhetoric and Composition I3
EH 124Rhetoric and Composition II3
EH 200Approaches to Literature3
HE 111The Husson Experience ***1
MS 132Probability and Statistics3
MS 181Calculus with Applications4
PH 110Introduction to Ethics3
or PH 220 Environmental Ethics
PY 111General Psychology3
PY 141Human Growth and Development3
SC 141Environmental Science3
Global Elective3
Fine Arts Elective3
Foreign Culture and Conversation Elective3
Open Elective3
Education Courses
ED 201Phil Foundations of Education (Clinical Placement)3
ED 204
ED 310
Classroom Management
and Educational Practicum I
4
ED 231Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment3
ED 307Technology in Education3
ED 317
ED 430
Methods in Secondary Science
and Educational Practicum III
4
ED 321Educating Exceptional Students3
ED 332
ED 320
Methods in Teaching Writing in the Schools
and Education Practicum II
4
ED 389Educational Psychology3
ED 450Student Teaching/Seminar in Teaching15
PY 322Diversity & Multiculturalism3
Concentrations
SC 150Astronomy of the Solar System3
SC 181
SL 181
Chemistry I
and Chemistry Lab I
4
SC 182
SL 182
Chemistry II
and Chemistry Lab II
4
SC 271
SL 271
Physics I
and Physics Lab I
4
SC 272
SL 272
Physics II
and Physics Lab II
4
SC 191
SL 191
General Biology I
and General Biology Lab I
4
SC 381
SL 381
Organic Chemistry I
and Organic Chemistry I Lab
4
SC 373Inorganic Chemistry 3
SC 134Introduction to Geology3
Choose one of the following3-4
Introduction to Meteorology
Soil, Air, and Water Chemistry
Mathematics and Physics of Sustainable Energy
Analytical Chemistry
and Analytical Chemistry Lab
Total Hours122-123

Suggested Course Sequence

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
EH 1233ED 201
ED 203
3
HE 111***1EH 1243
PY 1113MS 1814
SC 1413SC 182
SL 182
4
SC 1503Foreign Culture and Conversation Elective3
SC 181
SL 181
4 
 17 17
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
EH 2003ED 204
ED 310
4
MS 1323PY 1413
SC 271
SL 271
4PY 3223
Global Elective3SC 191
SL 191
4
SC 135 or SC 283 or SC 367 or SC/SL 3943-4 
 16-17 14
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ED 2313SC 1343
ED 3213SC 272
SL 272
4
ED 332
ED 320
4SC 373 3
ED 3893Open Elective3
SC 381
SL 381
4 
 17 13
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ED 3073ED 45015
ED 317
ED 430
4 
Fine Arts Elective3 
PH 220 or 1103 
 13 15
Total Hours: 122-123
***

Credit may not be required for degree completion. 

ED Courses

ED 201. Phil Foundations of Education. 3 Hours.

An integral component for all education majors, this course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the rewarding, yet challenging, teaching profession. Students broadly explore an overview of the educational field and its philosophical, political, legal, and social foundations. Current issues impacting education in a changing society will be examined. Coursework is intended to stimulate thoughtful reflection as students use information to develop their own beliefs concerning educational issues. Education Students will complete their first 30 hour clinical (ED 203) as part of this course. Students in other majors are not required to complete the Clinical Experience.

ED 202. Methods of Teaching Outdoor and Adventure Education. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to expose students to a variety of outdoor experiences with an emphasis on student participation in the activities. Students will also explore ways to incorporate outdoor in a variety of educational settings. Mastery of certain skills and the methodology employed in presenting these skills will be central to the course. Examples of the types of activities that may be covered through the course include canoeing, hiking, mountain biking, orienteering, camping skills, outdoor games, and an introduction to winter sports.

ED 203. Clinical Experience. 0 Hours.

All Education students are required to complete one 30 clock-hour block of a non-credit clinical observation experience in K-12 schools. This experience is completed as part of ED 201 Philosophical Foundations of Education and is designed to allow students to better understand the profession by observing experienced teachers in classroom settings. Through this experience, future educators will gain an appreciation of what happens “behind the scenes” in schools and other professional settings. Prerequisite(s): ED 201.

ED 204. Classroom Management. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to explore classroom management practices in educational settings. The course is taken concurrently with an education practicum so students will be able to observe and implement the techniques of practicing teachers in the areas of behavior modification, social skills training, and classroom management structures. Prerequisite(s): ED 201.

ED 208. Skills Activities. 3 Hours.

This course explores the application of learning and performance of motor skills in a variety of activities. Dance, racquet sports, aquatics and track/field will be participatory and allow students to gain experiential opportunities with instruction, drill progression, strategies, equipment and facility preparation and reflection. Instructor and peer feedback will enhance this class, and allow tactical decision-making competencies.

ED 213. Curriculum and Evaluation in Health and Physical Education. 3 Hours.

This course introduces Health and Physical Education majors to curriculum design and policy. Students will explore how to create, design, organize and evaluate a K-12 Health or Physical Education curriculum. Students will also learn how such a curriculum would be implemented and be expected to relate how a curriculum map ensures that all appropriate Maine Learning Results and grade level competencies are included. This course addresses multiple outcomes relating to the curriculum found in InTASC.

ED 215. Teaching Elementary Health Education. 3 Hours.

This course covers the foundation for healthy habits and active lifestyles which are introduced and reinforced during the K-8 experience. Topics that build both self-esteem and character, along with experiential health and physical activities will be examined. The American Association for Health Education and the Maine Learning Results will be used in conjunction with curriculum guides as students design lessons and units in health education.

ED 222. Personal Health & Fitness. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce the health and physical education student to a core of competences to employ at the K-12 teaching levels. Several health topics will be covered including personal fitness, mental health, stress management, nutrition and diet, tobacco, and cardiovascular disease, as well as a variety of fitness and healthy experiences with an emphasis on actual participation in the activities.

ED 223. PE/Health Practicum I. 1 Hour.

The Practicum courses are one credit offerings designed to provide field experience for students enrolled in the three ED methods courses associated with their major. They are in the areas of Elementary, Secondary and Adaptive PE/Health. In most cases, the field experience will be chosen to coincide with the methods course in which the student is enrolled. The student will log at least 30 hours in a placement, most often within a school, secured by the clinical placement supervisor. This course is taken by physical education majors concurrently with ED 446. Prerequisite(s): ED 203.

ED 231. Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for students in the elementary/secondary education K – 12 programs. It is a general methods course for assessment, curriculum design, development and methods of instruction. This course focuses on the "what to teach", "how to teach", and “planning the context for teaching and learning” with the goal of providing an integrated approach in instruction. Such an integrated approach involves interventions (accommodations and modifications) in the design of instruction to teach all learners. This course ensures that pre-service teachers gain a broad knowledge in the methods of instruction as well as supporting diversity in the classroom. The course presents comprehensive and balanced coverage of all aspects of assessment relevant to classroom teachers. Prerequisite(s): ED 201.

ED 240. History and Philosophy of Physical Education. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the philosophical and historical principles of health and physical education. It will include an historical overview of these education disciplines and cover current day principles. This course also offers an opportunity for critical examination of both theory and practice in the professions of health and physical education, wellness, sport and fitness.

ED 243. Team Sports/Tech & Strategies. 3 Hours.

Formal physical education, recreational and camp settings include games and strategies. It is the strategies component that enhances participation. Understanding game strategy promotes application of techniques and skills. Games research has also shown that the more strategy participants understand, the greater the chance of participation and satisfaction (Mitchell, S.). Thus tactical problem solving and teaching strategies will be the points of emphasis within a variety of invasion, net/wall, target, and striking/fielding games. Students will have the opportunity to learn skills, drills, techniques and strategies, and practice planning and teaching sport lessons during class.

ED 299. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer advanced courses in education that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty.

ED 302. Adapted and Developmentally-Appropriate Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Adapted and developmentally appropriate physical education programs are the art and science of developing, implementing, and monitoring carefully designed instructional programs to meet the unique needs of individuals. Teaching approaches are both task-specific and developmental in nature and the course is designed to enable teachers to successfully address a range of specific needs in the physical education setting. This course is based on authentic and comprehensive assessments to give participants skills necessary for a lifetime of leisure, recreation, and sport experiences to enhance physical fitness, participation and wellness. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 213 and (ED 232 or ED 447).

ED 307. Technology in Education. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the history and structure of the field of instructional technology, with an emphasis on integrating as an educational tool. Students will experience creative skills and confidence necessary to use mainstream and emerging hardware and software available in most school settings. Prerequisite(s): ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 310. Educational Practicum I. 1 Hour.

ED 310 Education Practicum is the first classroom experience for university students considering the profession of teaching by spending time in an assigned classroom, students will shift their perspective from that of a student to that of a teacher. This experience is designed, in part, to provide students with the opportunity to interact with a mentor teacher and pupils in a classroom setting. The extent of involvement will depend on the needs of the teacher, the organization of the classroom, and the stage of development of the practicum student. This course is viewed as a shared professional responsibility among teachers, administrators, and Husson faculty to provide a professional classroom experience for participating students. Prerequisite(s): ED 203.

ED 314. Assessment Practices. 3 Hours.

Presents comprehensive and balanced coverage of all aspects of assessment relevant to classroom teachers. Students learn to construct and use paper-and-pencil, alternative, and standardized assessments; analyze objectives; use grading systems; and judge assessment quality.

ED 316. Methods in Science. 3 Hours.

Science education is presented with a constructivist approach. Students become familiar with curricular content, methodology, and instructional planning that stimulates scientific interest and concept formation. Resources for science education will be collected for future. With a constructivist approach in mind, techniques for assessing student inquiry processes are explored. Students also learn ways to use instructional and design technology to enhance lessons. Prerequisite(s): ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 317. Methods in Secondary Science. 3 Hours.

This course offers a hands-on, practical approach that introduces students to a variety of strategies they can directly implement upon entering a position as a 7-12 teacher of science. Concentrating on practical application rather than theoretical implications, students will refine and add to their repertoire of teaching strategies. We will begin by learning how differentiating activities, based upon learning styles and ability, can enhance the learning of each student in a classroom. Students will be engaged in the direct completion of project-based learning in the form of laboratory experiences, lesson building, and cooperative tasks. Direct implementation of current science project-based pedagogy will be the emphasis. Students will apply their understanding of the new methods by creating a series of mini-lessons, typical lessons, and projects that are reflective of their understanding. Teaching science is not just about creating lesson plans and writing labs – it is also about engaging students, maintaining their interested in science and devise a number of ways to motivate them to complete their learning tasks and raise their aspirations. Many classes will begin with sample laboratory experiences and will then progress forward to introduce, explain, and model different methods for instruction, questioning, and assessment; all within the context of product-based inquiry. The course will seek to help pre- service teachers to develop an understanding and appreciation of science. This will hopefully make an impression upon students to acquire knowledge, attitudes, and skills essential to science literacy. Prerequisite(s): ED 231 and ED 204.

ED 318. Teaching Students With Special Needs. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide Career and Technical Education (CTE) teachers, educational technicians and teachers-in-training the necessary skills to develop learning environments where all special needs students can be successful. It is built upon the foundations of current legislation, appropriate curricula, assessment modifications and individualized instruction using successful teaching strategies to provide improved levels of success for students with special needs.

ED 319. Methods in Secondary English. 3 Hours.

In this course students learn how to teach reading and writing genres with secondary students. We explore strategies and processes in the English Language Arts while connecting it to literacy across the curriculum. We explore literacy and technology, accommodations and differentiated learning, assessment, selection of literature to serve purposes for reading and writing, issues in the secondary classroom, and models of instruction. We will inquire into certain questions, such as, What methods work best with adolescents? How does technology fit into the classroom? Why is reflection a big deal? How does the English teacher address reading and writing in the content areas? What does being an English teacher mean? You will be both a student in the course, participating in practices, and a teacher, designing and implementing learning sequences. The course objectives address the Common Core, InTASC, and ISTE NETs standards. Prerequisite(s): ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 320. Education Practicum II. 1 Hour.

Education Practica provide classroom experience for university students thinking of becoming teachers. By spending time in an assigned classroom students will shift their perspective from that of a student to that of a teacher. These experiences should be viewed as pre-student teaching opportunities and are designed, in part, to provide university students with the opportunity to interact with a mentor teacher and students in a classroom setting. The extent of involvement with the mentor teacher will depend on his or her needs, the organization of the classroom, and the stage of development of the practicum student. Practicum students have varied backgrounds and experiences. These strengths and experiences should be utilized to enrich the learning opportunities for the students in the classroom and the practicum student. This program is a shared professional responsibility among teachers, administrators, and Husson faculty to provide a professional classroom experience for university students seeking a career in teaching. Prerequisite(s): ED 203.

ED 321. Educating Exceptional Students. 3 Hours.

Prepares classroom teachers to successfully educate students with disabilities within the regular classroom setting. While the primary focus is to manage the instructional requirements of students with disabilities, the course incorporates the legal and ethical standards for mainstreaming and the roles of parent advocacy and support groups. Additionally, students become familiar with instructional issues represented by students from culturally, ethnically, and socio-economically diverse populations. Course content also explores the importance of enhancing educational opportunities of diverse learners via procedural due process, diagnostic practices, and development of professional and parent collaboration.

ED 323. PE/Health Practicum II. 1 Hour.

The Practicum courses are one credit courses designed to provide field experience for students enrolled in the three ED methods courses associated with their major. These are in the areas of Elementary, Secondary and Adaptive PE/Health. In most cases, the field experience will be chosen to coincide with the methods course in which the student is enrolled. The student will log at least 30 hours in a placement secured by the clinical placement supervisor. In most cases, this will be a school setting. Students will be responsible for arranging their own schedule with their cooperating teacher. The hours logged should be recorded over a period of 10-12 weeks and should be on a regular schedule. In addition to the hours recorded in the placement, students will be expected to attend 3-4 meetings with the field supervisor and/or placement supervisor during the course of the semester. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 213 and ED 203.

ED 324. Young Adult Literature. 3 Hours.

This course, organized by trends in young adult literature, offers participants an opportunity to learn more about the young adult novel and other genres, how to select appropriate, high-quality books, how to incorporate it into a traditional classic-based classroom, and how to make the reading of young adult novels relevant to students' lives. Through reading, discussing, and writing about books in different genres, students explore issues and trends including appropriateness in the classroom, close reading strategies, issues of diverse audiences and subject matter, the young adult and the canon, and literary theory such as reader response. Participants select books of their interest, read class books, and make connections to readings from the professional literature. The course integrates the Common Core and InTASC standards for teachers. It will help teachers find practical ways to integrate quality young adult novels into their curriculum, integrating teaching of literature and content areas, and making literature more accessible for their students. Prerequisite(s): ED 201.

ED 325. Brain Gym. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to educational kinesiology and an overview of Brain Gym movements. Students will also learn a multi-step implementation process for increasing concentration, participation and problem-solving in the classroom. The highly interactive course design encourages the integration of Brain Gym techniques throughout the learning process.

ED 328. Children's Literature. 3 Hours.

This survey course provides an overview of children’s literature, its genres, authors, ideas for instruction and response, criteria of selection, children’s development, and the teacher as reader. Students will explore ways to bring children to diverse, contemporary children’s literature in the language arts and content areas while at the same time becoming more experienced, insightful, and informed readers of children’s literature. Prerequisite(s): ED 201.

ED 330. Substance Abuse and Prevention. 3 Hours.

Society faces abuse challenges as a result of domestic and global sources of addictive substances. This course offers an opportunity for critical examination of both theory and practice as students analyze available data on substances such as nicotine, caffeine, alcohol, over the counter drugs, prescriptive drugs and illegal drugs. Students also examine the role family, friends, education, the media and/or marketing may play in the decision-making process of individuals. Drug prevention programs and rehabilitative programs are reviewed with video input from professionals. Course content is drawn from videos, interviews, research, case analysis, projects and online discussion. These serve as reflective tools to build the student's knowledge.

ED 332. Methods in Teaching Writing in the Schools. 3 Hours.

This course is based on the belief that teachers of writing at any grade level teach with greater understanding when they are active writers themselves and when their writing has a place and function in the world. Participants practice in instruction that draws on research on teaching writing, in assessment of writing, and in the teaching of the writing process approach, conducting conferences, modeling, and writing in the content areas with applications in the classroom. Adapting instruction to the development of writers is included. Participants focus on how they, as teachers, solve problems in writing so they support young writers develop their writing. Strategies of instruction are explored through focused lessons addressing Common Core standards and demonstrated during our sessions. Integration of practicum experience and application of course principles and strategies are expected. Prerequisite(s): ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 350. Teaching Elementary and Secondary Health Education. 3 Hours.

This course can help prepare elementary and secondary level health educators with information, classroom management techniques, instructional strategies and appropriate curriculum, as well as provide opportunites for teaching health lessons to peers with peer feedback. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 213.

ED 352. Emerging Trends In Career and Technical Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the participant an overview of current events, issues, and policies aligned to Career and Technical Education (CTE) from a National, regional, and local perspective. The design of the course will ask students to be reflective about their school, classroom, and personal challenges regarding their involvement in Career and Technical Education.

ED 380. Curriculum-based Instruction for the CTE Classroom and Shop. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on brain-based learning, strategies to develop student skills as readers, writers, and thinkers, Quadrant D lesson planning, gradual release of responsibility model, and questioning techniques.

ED 381. Introduction to Effective Classroom Management. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the participant an overview of current events, issues, and policies aligned to Career and Technical Education (CTE) from a National, regional, and local perspective. The design of the course will ask students to be reflective about their school, classroom, and personal challenges regarding their involvement in Career and Technical Education.

ED 382. Introduction to CTE Classroom Teaching. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the participant an overview of current events, issues, and policies aligned to Career and Technical Education (CTE) from a National, regional, and local perspective. The design of the course will ask students to be reflective about their school, classroom, and personal challenges regarding their involvement in Career and Technical Education.

ED 383. E-Portfolio for Teachers. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the participant an overview of current events, issues, and policies aligned to Career and Technical Education (CTE) from a National, regional, and local perspective. The design of the course will ask students to be reflective about their school, classroom, and personal challenges regarding their involvement in Career and Technical Education.

ED 389. Educational Psychology. 3 Hours.

The course examines the educational perspectives of K-12 students. Students in the course will incorporate the principles of educational psychology in a variety of classroom settings and decision-making processes. Authentic case studies will be used to analyze the practical applications of these principles in teaching and learning situations. Theories, principles, and issues investigated in this course are cognitive, linguistic, personal, social, emotional & moral development, and students with special needs. There will be an in depth study of how students learn in the areas of cognitive learning process, construction of knowledge, behavior views of learning, social cognitive learning and motivation. Instructional processes will be examined in relation to instructional strategies, student interactions, and learning assessment. This is a third year course. Students will demonstrate their understanding by identifying the principles of educational psychology during visits to their assigned schools. Prerequisite(s): PY 111.

ED 404. Methods in Reading. 3 Hours.

This course integrates different perspectives on reading instruction as participants survey instructional approaches and informal reading assessments to support instruction in a balanced literacy program appropriate for the K-8 classroom. Participants examine and apply methods of developmental literacy. They also practice research-based methods that address different aspects of reading and different content areas. In their practice they create and implement lessons that support reading skills and strategies, design instruction tailored to different readers, and integrate understanding of children’s literature and other reading resources in the classroom. Methods are applied in the practicum. Students integrate the Maine Learning Results and Common Core into their practice and address the professional standards of certification. Outcomes for the course include a portfolio of methods, approaches, and lessons in reading. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 408. Methods in Language Arts. 3 Hours.

This course, integrated with the other literacy courses in the elementary education program, introduces students to the instructional practices of the interrelated language art components of listening, talking, reading, writing, viewing, and representing appropriate for K-8 classrooms. Students survey methods of informal assessments, apply methods and approaches to teaching other content areas, practice the writers’ workshop, integrate the Maine Learning Results, Common Core, and instructional approaches, and relate their learning and practice to the professional standards for teaching certification. Among the outcomes are a portfolio of instructional practices, an integrated thematic unit of instruction, and products of the writers' workshop. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 409. Methods in Mathematics. 3 Hours.

This course introduces mathematic concepts and problem solving strategies along with real-world applications. Methods emphasize an active learning process in which children engage in guided discovery and problem solving opportunities. Teachers learn to coach youngsters to reflect on their process to clarify ideas for themselves and to share their thoughts with others. Models of engaged learning scenarios will be developed and discussed. Prerequisite(s): ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 410. Assessment in Health and Physical Education. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course will be on measurement and assessment of achievement. Multiple practice opportunities will be provided in designing and implementing measurement/evaluation methods and tests recognizing that the ultimate purpose is to enhance the decision-making process so improvement can be made (Baumgartner, 2007). Both the classroom and lab will be utilized to implement health and physical education tests and evaluation. Students gain skills using assessments within physical education and health education content. Tools for assessing the levels of competency are utilized at each elementary and secondary grade level. Teacher preparation students will apply these assessment tools to current programs.

ED 411. CTE Assessment I. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to the use of formative, summative and diagnostic assessments. Specific topics will include the appropriate use and design of certification tests as well as reading and math assessments.

ED 415. Methods in Social Studies. 3 Hours.

Methods in teaching Social Studies provides students with an overview of the field of Social Studies, selected issues in the field, and best practice strategies for teaching social studies in the K - 8 classroom. Students will identify important social studies knowledge, skills, and dispositions; investigate how students learn most effectively; and apply this new learning to lesson/unit design and instruction. Curriculum will be aligned to both national and state standards for both social studies and literacy. Prerequisite(s): ED 204 and ED 231.

ED 419. Mentoring Children and Youth. 3 Hours.

Through experience in this course, students will develop a mentoring relationship with either an elementary or middle school student. Mentoring can be an intense process where a positive, adult role model is matched with a youngster who needs assistance with academic efforts and social/behavior issues. This course will provide insight to many issues that surround a youngster's life. Issues and topics on poverty and education, cross-cultural competencies, tutoring skills, goal setting and violence in schools and society will be addressed.

ED 420. Physical Activity Programming in Youth Development. 3 Hours.

This class will provide a philosophical and practical base for working in youth development programs. This class will discuss the history of youth development programming, the current trends in youth development and the role of physical activity as a tool to better serve youth. This class will focus on programs that serve youth through physical activity, with special emphasis on goals of personal and social responsibility.

ED 421. Evaluating Youth Development Programs. 3 Hours.

Students will become aware of various models for evaluating youth development programs, and become familiar with the rationale and various assumptions for evaluating youth development programs. Students will also understand the various data sources for evaluating youth development programs, and be knowledgeable of the various ways to analyze, interpret, and disseminate data collected in the evaluation process.

ED 422. Educational Studies. 6 Hours.

ED 422 is the capstone experience for education students seeking future employment in a setting other than a traditional classroom. The 90-hour internship is spread over a minimum of twelve weeks and allows students to gain practical experience working with staff, learners, and other members of an agency or organization in a community setting (e.g. municipal recreations departments, public libraries, children's museums, social service agencies, etc.) During this field experience, students learn about the organization or agency, study the implementation and evaluation of its programming, and design a related project to contribute to the site. The connected on-campus class will provide an opportunity for students to share their experiences and provide peer feedback.

ED 423. PE/Health Practicum III. 1 Hour.

One credit practicum courses are designed to provide field experience for students enrolled in the three ED methods courses associated with their major. These are in the areas of Elementary, Secondary and Adaptive PE/Health. In most cases, the field experience will be chosen to coincide with the methods course in which the student is enrolled. The student will log at least 30 hours in a placement secured by the clinical placement supervisor. In most cases, this will be a school setting. Students will be responsible for arranging their own schedule with their cooperating teacher. The hours logged should be recorded over a period of 10-12 weeks and should be on a regular schedule. In addition to the hours recorded in the placement, students will be expected to attend 3-4 meetings with the field supervisor and/or placement supervisor during the course of the semester. Prerequisite(s): ED 203.

ED 430. Educational Practicum III. 1 Hour.

Education practica provide classroom experiences for future teachers. These experiences are designed, in part, to provide students with the opportunity to interact with a mentor teacher (MT) and pupils in the classroom setting. The extent of involvement with an MT will depend on the needs of the teacher, the organization of the classroom, and the stage of development of the practicum student. Strengths and experiences gained from practica should enrich the learning in the classroom. Prerequisite(s): ED 203.

ED 440. Disease Prevention & Health Promotion. 3 Hours.

In this course, core competencies regarding disease prevention and health promotion will be obtained, practiced and employed. Students will build upon personal health and wellness skills, and incorporate diverse perspectives in designing and implementing a Health Promotion program.

ED 441. Community Health. 3 Hours.

Community Health encompasses the topics of public health issues, policies and community health services across the lifespan. Students also study global health issues, community health issues and the impact of environment, geographic location and socio-economic status on human health, as well as public policies and health services. In this course, students will research and present a community health education and picture project.

ED 444. Individual Sports & Lifetime Activities. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide an informational and experiential overview of pursuits that may be classified as individual sports and lifetime activities. Attention will be paid to what place these activities may have in schools, recreational programs and other programs associated with youth development and learning. The role of lifetime fitness and health will be discussed and explored.

ED 445. Comprehensive School Health. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the need for comprehensive school health education for students and society. Students will examine the role of the health educator as coordinator of the school health program. National Health Standards will guide the curricula as students learn about policies, procedures and activities designed to promote K-12 healthy living.

ED 446. Elementary P.E. Methods. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to teach prospective physical education teachers the concepts necessary to become an effective teacher. The class will study classroom management, planning, teaching instruction, student feedback and assessment. Students will have the opportunity to practice planning and teaching techniques during the concurrent practicum ED 323 PE/Health Practicum II. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 213.

ED 447. Secondary P.E. Methods. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to teach prospective physical education teachers the concepts necessary to become an effective teacher. The class will study classroom management, planning, teaching instruction, student feedback and assessment. Students will have the opportunity to practice planning and teaching techniques by conducting lessons during the attached practicum experience. Prerequisite(s): ED 201 and ED 213.

ED 450. Student Teaching/Seminar in Teaching. 15 Hours.

ED 450 is the culminating experience of the Husson Teacher Education Program and occurs after all other coursework and requirements have been completed. It has two required concurrent sections: a sixteen-week student teaching field placement and a weekly capstone seminar in teaching. This dual approach is designed to integrate pedagogy and professional practice to ensure that clear connections are made by student teachers as they strive to become effective educators. The InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards and the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers NETS-T provide the framework for both the student teaching section and the seminar. ED 450 is viewed as a collaborative undertaking among students, instructors, and supervising teachers.

ED 499. Topic/. 1-3 Hour.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer advanced courses in education that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty.

ED 600. Research Methods in Business and Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for graduate students who have little or no formal preparation in those areas of research and problem-solving essential for a comprehensive study of business and education at the graduate level. Emphasis is placed on the identification of common problem types and the selection and use of appropriate methods of analysis (primarily statistical in nature).

ED 601. Theoretical Foundations of Learning. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced study of the application of the principles of educational theory and psychology in teaching students PK–12. Theories, principles, and issues investigated in this course include cognitive, linguistic, personal, social, emotional and moral development, the role of educational theory in practice, and students with special needs. Students in the course will incorporate the principles of educational psychology and an array of theoretical frameworks in a variety of classroom settings and decision-making processes. Authentic case studies will be used to analyze the practical applications of these principles in teaching and learning situations. The course includes an in-depth study in the areas of cognitive process, construction of knowledge, behaviorists’ views of learning, social cognition, and motivation. Students will conduct analyses of learning theories in light of this knowledge. Instructional processes will be examined in relation to instructional strategies, student interactions, and learning assessment. Emphasis will be on the development of successful academic and social interventions using an inquiry-based approach. Students will demonstrate their understanding by identifying the principles of educational psychology and learning theory in their school setting.

ED 603. Advanced Curriculum and Instruction. 3 Hours.

This graduate level core course is designed to enhance student understanding of curriculum content, design, policy, and instructional strategies through the application of curriculum theory, assessment and technology. Students acquire skills in planning the context for learning utilizing authentic experiences for diverse populations and the promotion of successful academic and social interventions using an inquiry-based approach. Identification and implementation of research-based instructional strategies are examined. Curricula are analyzed using an integrated approach to instruction that promotes grade level competency. Students demonstrate curricula mapping in accordance with Maine standards.

ED 701. Introduction to School Guidance Counseling. 3 Hours.

This course will survey the philosophy, objectives, principles and program of comprehensive developmental school guidance programs at the K-12 level. The course will focus on National and State Models of School Counseling.

ED 702. Advanced Assessment Practices. 3 Hours.

In this advanced assessment course, students build upon their understanding of current trends, issues, and practices in assessment. This core course in the Master of Education program is conducted in a seminar format; students participate in whole group and small group discussions related to assigned readings, current practices, and their own experiences in assessment. Students are expected to synthesize information from multiple sources, analyze and apply applicable theories to assessment practices, and evaluate embedded and programmatic assessments. Students analyze the strengths of various assessment techniques based on reliability statistics, and evaluate arguments of validity. Students also produce recommendations and interventions based on assessment findings. Students create curriculum maps, assessment maps, objective assessments, performance assessments, and programmatic assessments as expected artifacts of learning, and utilize course projects to address their own K-12 or post-secondary assessment needs.

ED 705. The Changing Role of the School Counselor. 3 Hours.

This course will review the historical and philosophical bases for school counseling programs, explore traditional roles for the school counselor, and examine the ethical and legal responsibilities of school guidance counselors. Focus will be given to recent applications of contemporary theories in educational settings as well as the role of the counselor in assisting all students in academic, career, and personal/social domains.

ED 706. STEM in the Classroom. 3 Hours.

This course provides the foundations of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education disciplines based upon the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the Math and ELA Common Core Standards. The approach used will be a multi-disciplinary experiential learning method that will engage participants in scientific and mathematical practices that can be directly applied in the classroom to help learners make connections across curricula. Core topics include STEM pedagogy, the nature of STEM education disciplines, integrative STEM learning, and deepening knowledge within the STEM disciplines. Course objectives are grounded in the the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) Model Core Teaching Standards and the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T).

ED 707. Literacy Across the Curriculum. 3 Hours.

This advanced course explores how literacy, broadly defined as reading, writing, talking, viewing, representing, and listening, can be a tool for thinking and learning in the content areas for all PK-12 students in different school environments of a diverse and globalized society. The course provides opportunity for participants to discuss and practice inquiry-based approaches that support learning and literacy development in the content areas, while integrating technology and instruction and connecting reading and writing. The course includes the genres and texts that teachers might use in the teaching of reading for different purposes. Professional and research literature are included. The workshop/seminar format of the course is interactive and includes lectures and demonstrations as students become more knowledgeable with respect to ethical decision-making, social responsibility, and reflective practice. Class participants will serve as resources, collaborators and teachers through in-class discussions, group work, and projects.

ED 708. Advanced Classroom Management. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to assist the classroom teacher in creating a climate that is safe and conducive to learning for all students in the inclusive classroom setting. Students will expand and apply their knowledge of theory and practical strategies for classroom management and student engagement. Through inquiry based study, learners will gain increased knowledge of effective strategies to implement when dealing with challenging student behaviors. Students will gain advanced skills with which to manage the inclusive classroom and be able to more effectively engage students and parents.

ED 799. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

Selected topics are offered centering on the needs and interests of the students and the availability of expert faculty.

ED 809. Integrating Technology into Instruction. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to a variety of technologies and computer applications that can enhance teaching, assessment, and the learning process. Class sessions and projects involve critically examining the theory and practice of using technologies to augment learning. Course objectives are grounded in the the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) Model Core Teaching Standards and the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T).

ED 810. Contemporary Issues in Educational Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of formal and informal models of teacher leadership as well as the opportunity for in-depth analyses of relevant topics from the current and past centuries. Students explore emerging trends that address leadership opportunities for teachers and issues related to group dynamics, motivation, communication, ethics, and human relations. Course topics also include educator evaluation, the nationalization of standards and assessment, standards-based education, globalization, diversity, and technology. Skills and strategies for effective leadership are developed, especially those related to organizational change, ethical decision-making, and team building.

ED 868. M.Ed. Capstone. 3 Hours.

Students will complete a supervised experience , thesis, or special project in their area of interest that has been pre-approved by the department. Prerequisite(s): ED 601 and ED 603 and ED 702 and ED 706 and ED 707 and ED 708 and ED 809 and ED 810 and CO 704 and BA 600.

SC Courses

SC 101. Introduction to Nutrition. 3 Hours.

This course serves as an introduction to nutritional concepts and to the interconnections of health, nutrition, weight, and physical activity. This course is particularly appropriate for students with no science background.

SC 104. Organismal Biology. 3 Hours.

Organismal Biology is an introductory biology course with an integrated lab, intended primarily for non-science majors. This course enables the student to become aware of their role in the complex biological system in which they live. Students will learn about plant biology, animal biology and microbiology in the context of how these organisms have shaped our current state of biodiversity. Since all organisms grow, develop and subsist within an environment, topics will include how organisms survive in, and interact with other organisms within their ecological community.

SC 105. Headline Science. 3 Hours.

This course explores various contemporary issues in science using an integrative and societal approach. Students will study the topics from a biological, chemical, physical, and environmental perspective, and relate the significance of the scientific matter to their major field of study. This course is intended for non-science majors.

SC 106. Introduction to Exercise Science. 3 Hours.

This is an introductory course to exercise science. Topics for the course include acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise, nutrition, biomechanics, and physical fitness. The course also covers concepts related to health and statistics.

SC 120. Functional Anatomy and Physiology. 3 Hours.

Functional Anatomy and Physiology is a one semester, 3 credit lecture with a separate laboratory course designed to give the non-science major knowledge of the human body and its relationship with the environment. Topics covered include: the chemical basis of life, the anatomy & physiology of all organ systems, growth, development, heredity and biotechnology issues.

SC 131. Human Genetics. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for nonscience majors to support the natural interest of most people in those human physical, behavioral, and social characteristics that have a hereditary basis. Lectures, discussions and the solving of simple genetic and statistical problems are used to form a basis for the consideration of current social issues with genetic implications.

SC 134. Introduction to Geology. 3 Hours.

The course, specifically designed for the Environmental Science majors, introduces fundamentals of geology in the environmental context. The issues of local and global environmental changes are placed into a broader perspective of the functioning of the Earth system. Students are introduced into the science of Earth' materials: rocks, minerals, soils, and waters and the processes forming them. The internal processes (plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes) and surface processes (streams, flooding, coastal zones, mass movements, glaciers, winds, desertification) are presented from the point of view of their influence on the geologic hazards, and on the distribution of natural resources. The interrelation of geology and human activities is examined in such contexts as waste disposal, air pollution, water contamination, climate change, land degradation, and resource and energy consumption. The format of this course includes one local field trip, lab activities on rocks and minerals identification, and introduction to topographic and geologic maps.

SC 135. Introduction to Meteorology. 3 Hours.

This course provides the student with a basic understanding of weather phenomenon and how weather is predicted. Students will master the terminology of weather prediction; explore the water cycle, and how the sun affects weather. The course will also treat atmospheric circulation, cloud formation and identification and students will learn how to make weather assumptions based on observations of temperature, pressure, humidity, wind direction, and sky cover. Students will also learn how weather data is collected and how forecasters make predictions based on previous and current weather observations.

SC 141. Environmental Science. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of the important topics in environmental science. Concepts of energy flow and nutrient cycling are explored in the context of human impacts upon these processes. Sources of pollution and their total effect on ecosystem and biosphere function are also explored. Management of material wastes and energy efficiency is an integral theme of the class. This class satisfies the laboratory science requirement with a series on in-class lab experiences and field trips.

SC 142. Conservation Biology. 3 Hours.

This course emphasizes the basic principles of conservation that are applied to utilization and management of natural resources such as soil, water, range lands, forests, wildlife, minerals, and human populations. The study of the interrelationships between living organisms and their environment is known as ecology. This course applies ecological concepts to conservation problems and policies.

SC 145. Environmental Science Field Experience I. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with Environmental Science job experiences on and off campus. These experiences range in length from days to months, but are less rigorous and in-depth than traditional internships. The experience will be composed of time spent with a professional from an Environmental Science profession while working in their area of expertise. Areas of concentration include, but are not limited to: agriculture, compliance, energy systems, environmental monitoring, land use, natural resources management, policy, research, and sustainability. The student should have three experiences in different areas of concentration in order to expose them to a variety of employment experiences in their first two to three years of the Environmental Science program, and assisting the student in determining the focus of the coursework for the last year of their program. Each field experience must be coordinated through, and approved by, the director(s) of the Environmental Science program.

SC 146. Environmental Science Field Experience II. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with Environmental Science job experiences on and off campus. These experiences range in length from days to months, but are less rigorous and in-depth than traditional internships. The experience will be composed of time spent with a professional from an Environmental Science profession while working in their area of expertise. Areas of concentration include, but are not limited to: agriculture, compliance, energy systems, environmental monitoring, land use, natural resources management, policy, research, and sustainability. The student should have three experiences in different areas of concentration in order to expose them to a variety of employment experiences in their first two to three years of the Environmental Science program, and assisting the student in determining the focus of the coursework for the last year of their program. Each field experience must be coordinated through, and approved by, the director(s) of the Environmental Science program.

SC 147. Environmental Science Field Experience III. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with Environmental Science job experiences on and off campus. These experiences range in length from days to months, but are less rigorous and in-depth than traditional internships. The experience will be composed of time spent with a professional from an Environmental Science profession while working in their area of expertise. Areas of concentration include, but are not limited to: agriculture, compliance, energy systems, environmental monitoring, land use, natural resources management, policy, research, and sustainability. The student should have three experiences in different areas of concentration in order to expose them to a variety of employment experiences in their first two to three years of the Environmental Science program, and assisting the student in determining the focus of the coursework for the last year of their program. Each field experience must be coordinated through, and approved by, the director(s) of the Environmental Science program.

SC 150. Astronomy of the Solar System. 3 Hours.

This is an introductory astronomy course with a virtual observing component that is intended to give the students some basic knowledge about the world in which we live. The primary objective of this class is to help the students understand the solar system. The course will present an overview of the night sky, the constellations, light -telescope and the nature of stars and the galaxies but the emphasis will be on understanding our solar system. The Sun, Earth, Moon, planets and their satellites, asteroids and comets will be studied in some detail. No mathematics or physics background is assumed in this course.

SC 151. Conceptual Physics. 3 Hours.

Conceptual Physics is an introductory physics course with an integrated lab, intended primarily for non-science majors. In this course we will study motion, mechanics, gravity, heat, electricity, magnetism, optics, atomic, nuclear and molecular physics, and relativity. We will also learn about the process by which physicists attempt to understand the intriguing laws of nature. The course will be taught using a combination of lectures, classroom demonstrations and laboratory experiments. Understanding of the fundamental concepts rather than number crunching is emphasized in this course and the equations will serve to refine the concepts and facilitate student’s thinking process. Ultimately, it is hoped that by taking this course the student will develop a better appreciation for the natural world.

SC 167. Energy and Society. 3 Hours.

This course examines the basic physical principles underlying various energy technologies and develops the quantitative skills necessary to evaluate these technologies. Students present their work in both written and oral form. The end goal of this course is to help students become citizens that have the requisite background and communication skills to intelligently participate in energy policy discussions and decisions. Topics typically include basic scientific literacy and notation, introductory physics (such as force, work, energy, power), circuit analysis, thermodynamics, various energy technologies (fossil fuels, nuclear power, solar, hydroelectric, etc.), and placing these technologies in a broader environmental, social, and economic context. This course includes an integrated laboratory in order to introduce basic laboratory skills. Prerequisite(s): MS 141 or MS 180 or MS 181 or MS 182.

SC 180. Principles of Gen Chemistry. 3 Hours.

This course explores fundamental quantitative and qualitative principles of inorganic, organic and biological chemistry and provides a basic understanding of theoretical and applied aspects of general chemistry.  Topics in inorganic chemistry include measurement, atomic theory and chemical bonding, chemical reactions and mass relationships, kinetic theory and gas laws, acids, bases, pH and buffers.  Organic chemistry will provide an overview of the nomenclature, properties and reactivity of major groups of organic compounds, while biochemistry will focus on the chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and enzymes.  An overview of biochemical energetics, nucleic acids and protein synthesis is also included.

SC 181. Chemistry I. 3 Hours.

This introduction to chemistry provides a basic understanding of theoretical and practical aspects of inorganic chemistry. The course includes the metric system, chemical elements and symbols, the structure of the atom, chemical bonds, molecules and compounds, and chemical reactions.

SC 182. Chemistry II. 3 Hours.

This course is a continuation of Chemistry I. It focuses on organic chemistry and biochemistry and provides a background for understanding the chemical mechanisms of health and disease. Organic chemistry will emphasize the study of carbon, its special properties, and its compounds. Biochemistry will focus on the chemicals of living organisms, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Selected physiological topics such as energy metabolism, the genetic code, and protein synthesis are included. Prerequisite(s): SC 181.

SC 190. The Science of Fingerprints. 3 Hours.

This course will allow students to examine every facet of the discipline, from the history of friction ridge identification and its earliest pioneers and researchers, skin growth in the embryo, structure of skin, scarring and histology, the chemistry of sweat and other secretions, to the scientific basis and the various steps of the identification process. The structure and growth of friction skin and how it can leave latent or visible prints are examined, as well as advanced identification methods in ridgeology, including Poroscopy, Edgeoscopy, Pressure Distortion and Complex or Problem Print Analysis. Students will learn how to process porous and non- porous items for friction ridge detail and how to preserve these impressions. Students will take known impressions and practice comparing developed impressions to these known exemplars.

SC 191. General Biology I. 3 Hours.

General Biology I focuses on biological principles that are fundamental to all of biology. This course covers the diversity of life and the commonalities of all living things including: molecular structure, cell structure and function, metabolism, cell division, heredity, and genetics. This course will also review the scientific process and the evaluation of scientific information. This course will prepare students for future courses in anatomy and physiology, cell biology, microbiology, biochemistry, genomic biology, and other biological specialties. This course is limited to students in programs requiring this course or are intending to take further biology courses.

SC 192. General Biology II. 3 Hours.

General Biology II is the continuation of a two-semester series in general biology for science majors. This course is designed to provide a thorough introduction to biology and prepare students for further study of evolution and ecology in SC 240. The goal of the course is to emphasize the diversity of species and for students to understand their relationship to, and their place in, the natural world. General Biology II is an introduction to the systematics, anatomy and physiology of the plant and animal kingdoms. This course will examine the structure and function of plant and animal organ systems in the framework of the evolution of adaptations. The course also concludes with an introduction to ecological systems.

SC 199. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer introductory courses in science that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty.

SC 202. Science Immersion. 3 Hours.

This course emphasizes conservation by providing students an experiential setting that illuminates various aspects of the precarious balance between people's effect on the environment and the natural order of things. Educational goals focus on the conservation and restoration of our natural heritage so that biodiversity is not depleted.

SC 210. Marine Biology. 3 Hours.

Oceans cover more than 70% of the earth's surface and support all life on the planet. This course follows an ecological approach to consider the adaptations and interactions of plants and animals with their marine habitats, with particular emphasis on the ecosystems and organisms in the Gulf of Maine. Communities discussed include the open ocean, the deep-sea, subtidal and intertidal zones, and estuaries, as well as habitats found exclusively in tropical and polar regions. Prerequisite(s): SC 191 or SC 192.

SC 221. Anatomy and Physiology I. 3 Hours.

This course provides an in-depth understanding of the structures and functions of the human body and its parts. The course begins with the organization of the human body and descriptive terminology relating to various segments of the body. Cellular anatomy and physiology and study of tissues lead to the study of the organ systems. Topics included in the course are skin, the skeletal system, joints, the nervous system, and muscle.

SC 222. Anatomy and Physiology II. 3 Hours.

This course is a continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. The course will provide a thorough understanding of structure-function relationships down to the molecular level. The semester will cover the special senses, blood, the cardiovascular system, lymphatics, the respiratory system, the digestive system, the urinary system, the endocrine system, and reproduction. Prerequisite(s): SC 221.

SC 224. Research Design. 3 Hours.

This course introduces basic concepts and skills needed for understanding and conducting research in the social, educational and health sciences. Students will receive a basic introduction to the fundamentals of research—what it involves, what types exist, and how to design and conduct such research. Examined are the essential terms and concepts of research necessary for students to critically evaluate research literature, develop solid research questions, and plan simple research projects. Active engagement with the research process will occur through class participation, exercises, literature reviews, development of research questions, and creation of inquiry strategies for answering research questions. Prerequisite(s): MS 132.

SC 234. Nutrition. 3 Hours.

This course examines the basic nutritional principles (biological, chemical and regulatory mechanisms); the changing nutritional requirements throughout the life cycle; the relationship between nutrition and disease; the principles of therapeutic nutrition (diet therapy) and the assessment of nutritional status. Prerequisite(s): SC 180 or SC 181.

SC 240. Ecology. 3 Hours.

This course explores the interaction of biotic and abiotic components in functioning ecosystems. It will examine topics in population distribution and dynamics, major terrestrial and aquatic habitats, community interactions such as competition and predation, nutrient cycling, energy flow, and ecosystem succession. The concurrently run lab will train students in identifying local flora and fauna, as well as collection and analysis of field data. Prerequisite(s): SC 191 and SC 192.

SC 241. Microbiology. 3 Hours.

This course provides a broad understanding of both beneficial and harmful microorganisms and their roles in human welfare. Emphasis is placed on the structure, physiology, and control of human pathogens, particularly bacteria and viruses. The lab provides experience in important techniques of culturing, identifying, and controlling microorganisms. Prerequisite(s): SC 104 or SC 191 or SC 221.

SC 242. Biotechnology. 3 Hours.

The current explosion in wonder drugs, diagnostic tests and medical treatments has resulted, primarily, from advances in biotechnology. This course will explore the origins and current status of biotechnology and how it is applied in the world or research, product development, medical diagnosis, disease treatment and law enforcement. This course will primarily focus on those areas of biotechnology that pertain to molecular biology and biochemistry. The laboratory portion of this course will expose students to many of the techniques used in molecular biology/biotechnology laboratories around the world. Prerequisite(s): SC 102 and SC 103.

SC 251. Astronomy. 3 Hours.

This is an introductory course that will describe, develop and create physical models for many of the observable astronomical events in the sky. The topics may include motion in the night sky, the solar system, light, stars, star groups, the origin of the universe, life in the universe, and UFO’s.

SC 261. Integrated Physical Science I. 3 Hours.

Integrated Physical Science I is the first course in the two semester sequence of Physical Science. The sequence is intended for, but not limited to, students planning career in elementary education. Using physical environment as a theme, principles of chemistry, physics, geology, atmospheric science, and space science are introduced, and reinforced through inquiry-based lab activities and field trips. This first course of the sequence, covers fundamental concepts of chemistry and physics, which include: motion, waves and particles, energy, structure and properties of inorganic and organic matter and their mixtures, interactions of energy and matter, order and equilibrium of physical systems. Prerequisite(s): EH 123 and (MS 111 or MS 141 or MS 180 or MS 181).

SC 262. Integrated Physical Science II. 3 Hours.

Integrated Physical Science II is the second course in the two semester sequence of Physical Science. The sequence is intended for, but not limited to, students planning careers in elementary education. Using environment as a theme, principles of physical sciences are introduced and reinforced through inquiry-based lab activities and field trips. The course covers fundamental concepts of geology, atmospheric science, and space science. Prerequisite(s): SC 261.

SC 271. Physics I. 3 Hours.

Physics I is the first course in a two semester general physics sequence. The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the concepts of force and motion, work and energy, fluids and gases, heat and thermodynamics, and periodic motion. The class meets for three hours each week in lecture and recitation, and two hours each week in the lab. This course assumes no prior background in physics. Prerequisite(s): MS 180 or MS 181.

SC 272. Physics II. 3 Hours.

This course continues the development of the basic physical concepts begun in SC 271. Topics include electricity and magnetism, optics, atomic theory, relativity. Quantum mechanics, nuclear physics, and elementary particles. The class meets for three hours each week in lecture and recitation, and two hours each week in the lab. Prerequisite(s): SC 271.

SC 283. Soil, Air, and Water Chemistry. 3 Hours.

An understanding of the fundamental chemistry implicit in the environment is important, but students must also be familiar with aspects of mineralogy, oceanography, soil science, sedimentology and microbiology. The course emphasizes natural geochemical processes and how they operate over a variety of scales. Topics range from global issues such as atmospheric pollution and its effect on global warming and ozone destruction to the link between microbiological populations and local and global scale nutrient and chemical cycling. The course is designed to introduce the student to that major systems and cycles in the environment and how materials and energy are cycled in these systems. Prerequisite(s): SC 181 and SC 182 and SL 181 and SL 182.

SC 285. University Physics I. 3 Hours.

University Physics I is the first course in a two semester, calculus based university physics sequence. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the concepts of force and motion, work and energy, simple harmonic motion, and waves. The class meets for three hours each week in lecture, two hours each week in recitation, and two hours each week in the lab. This course assumes no prior background in physics. Prerequisite(s): MS 181.

SC 286. University Physics II. 3 Hours.

This course continues the development of the basic physical concepts begun in SC285. Topics include electricity, magnetism, and optics. The class meets for three hours each week in lecture, two hours each week in recitation, and two hours each week in the lab. Prerequisite(s): MS 181 and SC 285.

SC 291. Cell Biology. 3 Hours.

This course is a detailed exploration of cell structure and function with an emphasis on the cytoplasm and extracellular matrix. Topics in membrane structure, transmembrane transport, vesicle trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and macromolecular assembly processes are considered. Cell to cell communications and the role of the extracellular matrix in tissue level processes are also explored. Superficial examination is given to the structure and organization of the nucleus, chromosomes and gene expression to prepare students for the companion course entitled Genomic Biology. Prerequisite(s): SC 191.

SC 292. Epidemiology. 3 Hours.

Basic concepts of epidemiology and methods for identification of factors influencing health and disease in human populations. Considerations are centered on physical, biological, psychosocial and cultural factors in relation to infectious and noninfectious diseases; interactions between agent, host, and environmental factors as determinants of health and disease; application of the epidemiologic approach to health services; and retrospective and prospective analysis of morbidity data. Instruction is by lecture, laboratory exercises and seminars.

SC 299. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer introductory courses in science that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty.

SC 312. Adult,Infant, and Child CPR First Aid. 3 Hours.

This is a standard American Heart and American Red Cross course in adult, infant and child emergency care of injuries and CPR. Standard certificate awarded on successful completion of course.

SC 330. Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

This course examines changes within the human body due to the effects of acute and chronic exercise.  The student is challenged to expand both their knowledge of and appreciation of human physiological reaction, regulation, and adaptation to exercise. Prerequisite(s): SC 111 or SC 120 or SC 222.

SC 332. Physiological Ecology of Animals and Plants. 3 Hours.

This course explores the structural and functional relationships within plants and animals that make them adapted to their environment. This course uses numerous examples to illustrate how plants and animals survive given the constraints of their environment. Examples will be taken from temperate, arctic, alpine, tropical, desert, and aquatic ecosystems. Prerequisite(s): SC 191 and SC 192.

SC 333. Pathophysiology. 3 Hours.

Pathophysiology is the study of abnormal, diseased physiological processes. The course begins with an examination of altered cell functioning, injury and death. The course continues with pathophysiology of the body systems and inability of diseased systems to maintain homeostasis. Also included are topics in inflammation, immunity, neoplasia, and adaptations of the body to stress. Although aging is not considered a disease, some aspects of aging will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): SC 221 and SC 222.

SC 334. Genomic Biology. 3 Hours.

This class will explore the structure of the nucleus, patterns of inheritance (traditional genetics), the molecular mechanisms of biological information management (molecular biology), and the technologies that are used to obtain and use the information contained within genomes (genomic science). The course will trace classical genetics, chromosome maps, the structure of DNA, gene expression and regulation, and the tools of molecular biology and genomic analysis. Prerequisite(s): SC 102 and (SC 180 or SC 181).

SC 340. Anatomical Basis of Kinesiology. 3 Hours.

This course involves studying the mechanics of human body movements and the interrelationships of bones, joints, and muscles. Prerequisite(s): SC 120 or SC 122.

SC 351. Oceanography. 3 Hours.

This course examines the physical and biological characteristics of the marine environment. Topics include the origin of earth and its oceans, life in the oceans, the history of oceanography, plate tectonics, the nature of water, ocean circulation, waves, tides, shorelines, and coastal regions. A large portion of the course examines the interrelationships between organisms and the marine environment, mariculture marine pollution, and pollution control.

SC 352. Biochemistry. 3 Hours.

In this offering, the student will be exposed to reductionism in the field of biology. Biochemistry overlaps and articulates with many fields of endeavor. The discipline embraces physiology, pharmacology, enzymatics, nutrition, immunology, structural biology, biotechnology, and molecular biology all at the same time. The course curriculum will focus upon the role of enzymes in guiding metabolic processes and pathways. The student will come to understand the details of biological functioning at these three levels of organization: Metabolism, metabolic pathways, enzymatic mechanisms and kinetics. Prerequisite(s): SC 182 and SC 191 and SL 191.

SC 353. Principles of Strength and Cardiovascular Conditioning. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of the principles of strength training and conditioning. By critically analyzing current research, students utilize an evidence-based approach to develop and justify conditioning programs and techniques for a broad range of sports and activities. Prerequisite(s): SC 340.

SC 360. Biomechanics & Kinesiology in Human Performance. 3 Hours.

This course examines the application of anatomical and physiological principles of kinesiology and physical movement. Topics include the scientific study of human movement, analysis of motor skills, and programs of exercise and evaluation of human performance. Prerequisite(s): SC 222 or SC 120.

SC 362. Dynamics of the Earth. 3 Hours.

This course presents the basic concepts of earth science that include a broad and nonquantitative survey at the introductory level of topics in geology, oceanography, meteorology and astronomy. In geology, the topics emphasized are plate tectonics, volcanic activity, mountain building, minerals and rocks, earthquakes, geologic time and earth history. In meteorology, the specific areas include weather elements, weather patterns and storms. The astronomy unit reviews constellations, the moon, the solar system and beyond. Laboratory activities are included to demonstrate concepts. Within each unit human use and manipulation of physical resources is examined from both a scientific and economic perspective.

SC 367. Mathematics and Physics of Sustainable Energy. 3 Hours.

In this course you will examine the basic physical principles behind the generation and consumption of electrical energy. Mathematical skills necessary to quantitatively compare different sustainable energy technologies and associated issues are developed. This course assumes no prior background in physics. Prerequisite(s): MS 141 or MS 180 or MS 181 or MS 182.

SC 371. Horticulture. 3 Hours.

This course presents the fundamentals of horticulture including topics such as environmental factors affecting plants, methods of growing plants, pruning, grafting, harvesting and storing, pests and horticulture plants and their control, horticulture for home grounds, and the vegetable garden. Laboratory activities enable students to practice experimental design and planting techniques used in horticulture.

SC 373. Inorganic Chemistry. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce the basic principles and concepts of inorganic chemistry. The course is intended for students who wish to pursue careers in chemistry, biochemistry, pharmacology, or the life sciences. Topics to be covered include: atomic and molecular structure, experimental techniques, bonding in polyatomics, acid/base chemistry, oxidation/reduction, descriptive chemistry of hydrogen and the s, p, d, and f block elements. Prerequisite(s): SC 181 and SC 182 and MS 181.

SC 381. Organic Chemistry I. 3 Hours.

This course comprises the first semester of a one-year introduction to the chemistry of carbon-containing compounds. It provides fundamentals of modern organic chemistry with an emphasis on chemical bonding, stereochemistry, and reaction mechanisms. Chemistry, as one of the exact sciences, requires quantification. Therefore, development of the critical thinking and problem solving strategies, as well as the experimental know-how and laboratory skills are major objectives of the course. Introduction to microscale lab techniques, modern analytical instrumentation, as well as computation technology additionally supports objectives of the course. Prerequisite(s): SC 182.

SC 382. Organic Chemistry II. 3 Hours.

This course comprises the second semester of a one-year introduction to the chemistry of carbon-containing compounds. It provides fundamentals of modern organic chemistry with an emphasis on stereochemistry, modern instrumental methods in identification of organic compounds, energetics, reaction mechanisms, and selected applications in biochemistry. Critical analysis of structure-properties` relationships in organic chemistry, and their applications, as well as more advanced know-how (FT-NMR or FT-IR, and UV/Vis spectroscopies) and laboratory skills (applications of semi-empirical molecular computations, and multistep synthetic procedures) are major objectives of this course. Prerequisite(s): SC 381.

SC 383. Junior Science Seminar. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to careers in science, the scientific research process, and research expectations within the biology, health science, chemistry and environmental science majors. The major focus is to develop a senior research proposal on the basis of what is attainable, interesting, and meaningful. Students learn, in detail, both the limits and expectations of undergraduate research in the sciences. Students are introduced to the important role of library resources and the professional literature as they investigate their chosen topic. Students are also expected to write a resume and career goals statement, give an oral presentation on a chosen career field in science, lead a class discussion of a scientific article, and submit a written research proposal that includes a scientific literature review, problem statement or hypothesis, a timeline for completion, and detailed budget for their proposed senior thesis research. Students present their proposed research and evaluate other student’s research proposals. Prerequisite(s): MS 132.

SC 393. Physical Chemistry. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the methods describing complex physiochemical systems and their responses to external chemical and/or physical stresses. Classical and modern theories of equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics, kinetic theory of transport phenomena, as well as quantum and statistical mechanics are introduced and applied to molecular systems and spectroscopy. Biological and biochemical problems are shown how to be formulated and solved by using principles of physical chemistry. Prerequisite(s): MS 132 and MS 181 and SC 182 and SC 272.

SC 394. Analytical Chemistry. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of analytical chemistry. It covers sample treatment, statistical analysis of data, measurement errors, and applications of chemical equilibrium, kinetics, transport, light scattering, emission, and absorption to chemical analysis. The following analytical methods are studied: Volumetric, gravimetric, electrochemical, chromatography, and spectroscopy. The course includes lab. Prerequisite(s): MS 132 and (MS 180 or MS 181) and SC 382 and SL 382.

SC 399. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer advanced courses in science that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty.

SC 410. Motor Learning in Human Performance. 3 Hours.

This course explores the application of learning and performance of motor skills. Topics include the scientific study of motor skills and abilities, motor control, attention and memory, motor skill learning, instruction and augmented feedback, and practice conditions. Prerequisite(s): SC 222 or SC 120.

SC 450. Physical Biochemistry. 5 Hours.

This course entails a study of the physical processes involved in living systems including thermodynamics and equilibria, kinetics and transport phenomena, and applications of quantum chemistry and spectroscopy. Prerequisite(s): SC 352 and SL 393 and MS 182 and SC 272.

SC 481. Senior Science Capstone Project I. 3 Hours.

This course serves as the capstone project for science majors in the School of Science & Humanities. The course provides experiential learning relevant to the student’s area of study. Acceptable projects include laboratory or field research, an internship with an approved mentor, research survey or some other project deemed appropriate by the faculty. During the course, students meet periodically with their faculty advisor to plan their progress through the project. At the end of the semester, students present the final results of their research or a summary of their experience in the form of an oral presentation and a written thesis. Prerequisite(s): SC 224 or SC 383.

SC 482. Biological Research & Laboratory Safety II. 3 Hours.

The course serves as the continuation of the capstone course in the Biology major and is necessarily preceded by SC 481. Students who wish to continue with their laboratory or field research may elect to take this course. The emphasis during this semester will be on increasing sample size or elaborating on the research that was started in SC 481. Students will be required to share their final results with the Husson University community and at a regional or national scientific meeting. Students will be encouraged to publish their work in the peer-reviewed literature. Prerequisite(s): SC 481.

SC 490. Environmental Science Research Seminar I. 3 Hours.

Environmental Science is a dynamic, responsive, and applied discipline. In this experiential course, students explore potential careers and research areas in Environmental Science. With individual guidance from course instructors as well as collaborative study, students will develop working résumés, apply for internship positions, and synthesize the primary scientific literature in their field of interest to develop a feasible scientific research proposal. An internship in environmental science with a local, state, or federal agency or a private organization is a required component of this course; students share their internship experience with classmates and the Husson community.

SC 491. Environmental Science Research Seminar II. 3 Hours.

This course serves as the capstone course in the Environmental Science Program. With guidance from course instructors, students conduct individual, self-directed research in their field of interest within the discipline of Environmental Science. During this course, students collect, analyze, and interpret data to complete a final written thesis. Students disseminate the results of their research with classmates and the Husson community in the form of a written and oral presentation. Exceptional students are encouraged to present their research at a local, state or national conference. Prerequisite(s): SC 490.

SC 492. Senior Chemistry Research Seminar. 3 Hours.

This capstone course provides an introduction to research in chemical sciences. In the seminar setting students critically review primary literature sources and design, with help of the instructor, a serious and original research proposal in theoretical or experimental chemistry. Students discuss their ideas and applied methodology with classmates during regular weekly meetings. The approved by instructor research hypotheses are subsequently validated by experiments, field studies, or theoretical calculations. Students report and share the research findings with classmates in the seminar format. The authors of projects of very high quality will be encouraged to present their work at regional chemical conferences. Prerequisite(s): SC 393 and SC 394.

SC 499. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer advanced courses in science that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty.

SL Courses

SL 120. Functional Anatomy and Physiology Lab. 1 Hour.

Functional Anatomy and Physiology Lab is a 1 credit lab that students take at the same time as taking the lecture part of the course, SC 120. It is laboratory designed to give the non-science major knowledge of the human body and its relationship with the environment. Topics covered parallel the lecture topics in SC 120 and include: the chemical basis of life, the anatomy & physiology of all organ systems, growth, development, heredity and biotechnology issues.

SL 180. Prin of Gen Chemistry Lab I. 1 Hour.

This is a laboratory class.

SL 181. Chemistry Lab I. 1 Hour.

This is a laboratory class.

SL 182. Chemistry Lab II. 1 Hour.

This is a laboratory class.

SL 191. General Biology Lab I. 1 Hour.

This laboratory course is to be taken concurrently with SC 191. It is designed to reinforce the fundamental biology concepts discussed in lecture as well as introduce students to laboratory procedures and the basics of the scientific method.

SL 192. General Biology Lab II. 1 Hour.

This laboratory course is to be taken concurrently with SC 192. This course is designed to provide hands-on experience with plant and animal diversity, comparative anatomy and physiology, as well as the collection and analysis of lab and field data.

SL 210. Marine Biology Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Marine Biology Laboratory must be taken concurrently with Marine Biology. Laboratory activities focus on the organisms and ecosystems in the Gulf of Maine and include field trips to local marine habitats as well as laboratory investigations of local flora and fauna. Prerequisite(s): SC 191 or SC 192.

SL 221. Anat/Physiology Lab I. 1 Hour.

This is a laboratory class.

SL 222. Anatomy/Physiology Lab II. 1 Hour.

This is a laboratory course. Prerequisite(s): SL 221.

SL 240. Ecology Lab. 1 Hour.

This lab focuses on ecological research principles and is designed to complement and reinforce the topics discussed in SC 240. The labs will include reading primary literature, case-studies, identification of local flora and fauna, and field and laboratory data collection and analysis.

SL 241. Microbiology Lab. 1 Hour.

This is a laboratory class.

SL 242. Biotechnology Lab. 1 Hour.

This is a laboratory class.

SL 271. Physics Lab I. 1 Hour.

This is a laboratory class.

SL 272. Physics Lab II. 1 Hour.

This is a laboratory class.

SL 285. University Physics I (Laboratory). 1 Hour.

University Physics I is the first course in a two semester, calculus based university physics sequence. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the concepts of force and motion, work and energy, simple harmonic motion, and waves. The class meets for three hours each week in lecture, two hours each week in recitation, and two hours each week in the lab. This course assumes no prior background in physics. Prerequisite(s): MS 181.

SL 286. University Physics II Lab. 1 Hour.

This course continues the development of the basic physical concepts begun in SC285. Topics include electricity, magnetism, and optics. The class meets for three hours each week in lecture, two hours each week in recitation, and two hours each week in the lab. Prerequisite(s): MS 181 and (SC 285 or SC 271).

SL 291. Cell Biology Laboratory. 1 Hour.

This course is the hands-on laboratory component of SC 291 (Cell Biology). It is designed to introduce the techniques used to study cell structure and function. By the end of the semester you should be familiar with cell identification, cell culture, transfection, protein purification, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot procedures.

SL 299. Topic/. 0-3 Hours.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer introductory courses in laboratory science that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty.

SL 381. Organic Chemistry I Lab. 1 Hour.

This is a laboratory class. Prerequisite(s): SL 182.

SL 382. Organic Chemistry II Lab. 1 Hour.

This is a laboratory class. Prerequisite(s): SL 381.

SL 393. Physical Chemistry Lab. 2 Hours.

This course is a hands-on laboratory component of the SC 393, covering topics in kinetics, thermodynamics, transport, and spectroscopy. The laboratory exercises apply physical methods to studies of complex physicochemical phenomena. Computer simulations of molecular properties complement the measurements. Three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): SL 182 and SL 272.

SL 394. Analytical Chemistry Lab. 2 Hours.

This course is a hands-on introduction to the fundamental techniques of analytical chemistry. It covers sample treatment and volumetric, gravimetric, electrochemical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic analytical methods. Three hours of laboratory per week are designed to supplement and reinforce the knowledge gained in the SC 394. Prerequisite(s): SL 182.

SL 399. Topic/. 0-3 Hours.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer 300-level courses in laboratory sciences that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty.

SL 499. Topic/. 0-3 Hours.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer advanced courses in laboratory science that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty.