CT (CT)

Courses

CT 100. Intro to Video Production. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the world of video and digital filmmaking. Students learn the basic skills needed to create high end, broadcast quality video, including shooting, non-linear editing, gathering professional audio, continuity, composition, and workflow management. In order to move on in the Video Production Program, a grade of C+ or higher must be achieved.

CT 105. Video Production I. 3 Hours.

The goal of this course is to build a solid foundation of information and skill level for students interested in video production and digital filmmaking. Video Production I goes beyond basic proficiencies learned through Intro to Video Production or from secondary education. It delves into camera operations and non-linear editing. Students also start to focus on the concept of crafting quality images through the use of light and how to “motivate” video in the editing process. Students take a number of practical exams to demonstrate a base knowledge of overall techniques, skills, and terminology used by industry professionals. Students need to earn a minimum grade of C+ to advance in the Video Production Program.

CT 110. Audio Technology I. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the fundamental concepts of audio production. It introduces students to sound and psycho-acoustics, the principles of audio consoles and signal routing, and essential technologies such as loudspeakers, microphones, and signal processing. Throughout the course, students develop a common vocabulary relating to the audio industry, concepts, and career options. Lab work includes mixing and signal flow exercises. In order to continue on in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs a grade of C+ or higher must be earned in this course.

CT 111. Music Structure and Style for Audio. 3 Hours.

This course fosters and appreciation of various musical genres and their typical forms, stylistic components, and instrumentation. Through regular music listening and analysis, students develop their abilities to communicate in professional music environments. Emphasis is made on critical listening skills that highlight the recording and mixing techniques common in music production.

CT 112. Applied Audio Technology I. 2 Hours.

This course is the lab segment for CT 110 Audio I, which introduces acoustics and psycho-acoustics, the principles of audio consoles and signal routing, and essential technologies such as loudspeakers, microphones, and signal processing. Throughout the course students develop a vocabulary of common audio definitions, concepts, and career options. Lab work includes mixing and signal flow exercises.

CT 114. The Design of Cinema. 3 Hours.

This course examines the many decisions that go into designing a film. Students will investigate the different styles and use of graphic elements, editing, sound, lighting, camera movement and how they construct the overall cinematic mise en scene. Critical analysis of the mise en scene is undertaken using many different genres of film as the subject. Different multi-cultural films spanning the range of realism to formalism will be explored using in-class screenings and examples. A survey of the evolution of filmmaking will be examined by tracing the history from its origins to present day. Prerequisite(s): EH 123.

CT 135. Scriptwriting. 3 Hours.

Every great project starts with a concept which needs to be molded into a script. This course will start at the beginning of story development to examine the classical narrative paradigm used in the majority of both independent and Hollywood filmmaking. There is a strong focus on standardized script formatting, story structure, character development, story arcs, and scene analysis. Students will use industry standard software to cultivate an original concept that they design throughout the stages of story development into a finished screenplay that a production team could then schedule, budget, shoot, and edit a completed film.

CT 205. Video Production II. 3 Hours.

In today’s visually charged environment there are many new and exciting avenues in video production and digital filmmaking. This course continues to explore video production and digital filmmaking and the differences in producing content for them. Whether creating for the Internet, an IPOD, a Blu-Ray presentation, or for a broadcast facility, learning what to gather and how to use it is essential for the industry. Expect many challenging projects, as students are asked to use video and audio to tell a complete story. Video II students learn how to control, layer, and convert light, students also learn how to use the camera to illustrate an idea in the form of moving pictures, and do so in a tapeless environment. Prerequisite(s): CT 105.

CT 205L. Video Production II Lab. 3 Hours.

This lab reinforces a number of key concepts explored through coursework. Video II students learn how to control, layer, and convert light. Students also learn how to use the camera to illustrate an idea in the form of moving pictures, and how to do so in a tapeless environment. Prerequisite(s): CT 105 and CT105L.

CT 206. Intro to Live Sound Technology. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the concepts and practices of live sound engineering. In the lab, students learn analog console functionality and how to properly set up a system for a live event. In the lecture, students receive a survey of live sound essentials including console operation and gain structure, microphone usage, electrical fundamentals, monitor engineering, and the basics of system design. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher. Prerequisite(s): CT 110 and EP 122.

CT 208. History of American Music. 3 Hours.

This is a traditional music appreciation course, with a few twists, such as ear training (hearing music in new ways), and exploring song form. Students will delve into the origins and development of pop music from the early 1800s until 1970. Class sessions will range from guided and critical listening to live demonstrations, lectures, DVDs, musical and lyrical analysis. Students will engage in dialogue about the societal, economic, cultural, and racial issues that impacted popular music in America, and how pop music itself impacted American culture.

CT 213. Pro Tools I. 3 Hours.

Pro Tools I offers an introduction to the most widely used application for music and post production in the world today. The course provides the foundational skills necessary for basic recording, mixing and editing within the Pro Tools environment. Students learn file structure, edit functions, time scale and ruler views, session configuration, recording and managing audio, importing audio and QuickTime movie files, MIDI basics, software based mixing, virtual instruments, region groups, looping audio, and the use of plug-ins. Prerequisite(s): CT 110 and CT 112.

CT 215. Music Production & Theory. 3 Hours.

This course helps students achieve an understanding of the ideas and principles behind the theory and the structure of music. Harmony, melody, rhythm, and form are explored, coupled with theory and ear training exercises, and composition projects. Prerequisite(s): CT 213.

CT 220. Critical Listening. 3 Hours.

Critical Listening instructs students to discern, measure, analyze, and discuss sound more accurately. Varied topics include anatomy and physiology of the ear, acoustics, audio data compression, and musical form and arrangement. Regular ear training exercises improve listening skills. Prerequisite(s): CT 206 and CT 213.

CT 224. TV Studio/Remote Production I. 3 Hours.

In this course, taught through lecture and hands-on experience, students learn how to organize and execute live productions inside the Television Studio and with NESCom’s 32-foot Digital Remote Production Unit, integrating the principles of content pre-planning and technical workflow to allow for a cohesive product from many different individuals. With a heavy focus on technical skills, this class teaches teamwork and communication in a live environment. This avenue of video distribution offers challenges and rewards whether students are in the field televising a football game or behind the switcher for a newscast. Prerequisite(s): CT 105.

CT 234. Advanced Lighting for Digital Filmmaking. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to closely examine the characteristics of light and how it can be used to enhance every aspect of digital filmmaking acquisition. Using a wide array of industry standard fixtures, students learn techniques that will allow them to transform the two-dimensional world of video and present it as a rich textured image, ideal for today’s high definition experience. This intense project-based course challenges students to apply critical viewing talents as they further develop the necessary skills required to enter the world of digital filmmaking. Prerequisite(s): CT 205.

CT 239. Electronic News Gathering (ENG). 3 Hours.

This course prepares students for the creative undertaking of photojournalism. Students are expected to utilize equipment to capture and portray assigned stories taking place around campus and the surrounding communities. Participants hone their skills in shooting professional video, lighting various locations, and sharpening interviewing skills. Consistent with the expectations of the industry, students are expected to produce at a high level, and meet pressing deadlines. Prerequisite(s): CT 105.

CT 243. Video Compositing & Motion Graphics. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of current software programs used to create motion graphics for various digital media productions. Students learn the skills to composite video and still graphics in after effects and motion, using color, space, keyframes and design in this project-based course that guides them towards creative awareness of animated graphic presentations in a 2D and 3D world. Students must earn a "C+" or better to advance in the Video Production Program. Prerequisite(s): CT 105.

CT 245. Photography I. 3 Hours.

This course introduces photography theory and practice. Through lecture and hands on labs, students are given the basic understanding of how to operate a still SLR digital camera. Students learn the terminology, camera operation techniques, and the importance of good composition, lens selection, flash and natural lighting. Basic image manipulation using Photoshop and printmaking will also be covered in this course. Students must maintain a C+ or better to move on to Photo II or Photojournalism.

CT 248. Filmmaking Pre-production. 3 Hours.

This course covers the process of producing your project and the tasks a producer can be expected to perform. Students will learn location surveying, scripts writing and analysis, storyboarding, camera charts, budgeting, and client communication; skills that are needed for format planning and media organization so as to maximize your potential and that of your crew. The course will examine a range of issues that effect the independent producer, including studio affiliation, independent financing, and project proposals.

CT 250. Applications of Live Sound Technology. 3 Hours.

Topics for this course include microphones, monitor engineering, wireless audio technologies, live sound for musical theater, and multichannel for live sound. Students delve into course topics through application. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): CT 206 and CT 213.

CT 251. Sound Reinforcement Techniques I. 3 Hours.

This course reinforces knowledge and skills through hands on experience. Topics include microphones, monitor engineering, wireless audio technologies, and more advanced signal flow concepts. Extensive participation in performance events is required, including concerts, video productions, sporting events, and variety shows. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): CT 206 and CT 213.

CT 270. Audio Technology II, Multitrack Recording & Mixing. 3 Hours.

In CT 270, students build upon their audio knowledge and experience obtained in Audio Tech. I, through classroom studies and hands-on recording and mixing. Students foster their knowledge by investigating audio fundamentals, signal flow, common recording technologies, and studio operation procedures. In the lab, students learn microphone, console, and session management techniques by recording live performers. In personal labs, students hone mixing and recording skills. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): CT 213 and CT 206.

CT 271. Applied Audio Tech II, Multitrack Recording & Mixing Lab. 2 Hours.

In this course, students learn microphone, console, and session management techniques by recording live performers. Students also learn multitrack recording techniques utilizing Pro Tools software. In personal labs, students hone skills by mixing prerecorded material. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): CT 213 and CT 206.

CT 299. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

This course listing is intended to provide the opportunity for faculty to offer courses of interest in Communications Technology that would not normally be part of the University curriculum.

CT 307. Web Development I. 3 Hours.

This course is an intermediate course offering the student the experience of planning, designing, developing and deploying a client-side web application utilizing JavaScript and jQuery. Students taking this course must have successfully completed Web Design - Behavior Layer. Prerequisite(s): IT 209.

CT 309. Web Development II. 3 Hours.

This course is an intermediate course offering the student the experience of planning, designing, developing and deploying a server-side web application utilizing PHP and MySQL. Students taking this course must have successfully completed Web Design - Behavior Layer. Prerequisite(s): CT 307.

CT 314. Business of Music. 3 Hours.

Business of Music surveys the changing landscape of the modern music industry. The course investigates the business organizations involved in the record and concert industries such as record labels, production companies, radio stations, recording studios, concert venues, and independent engineers and producers. Various topics outline paths of revenue, career options, recording contracts, and copyright issues. Special attention is made toward developing business skills critical for success in this highly competitive field.

CT 315. Digital Cinematography. 3 Hours.

Through various exercises, students learn how film and television productions utilize digital cinematography techniques with different types of cameras. Students will explore and evaluate digital image capture from an artistic as well as technical standpoint, and learn to implement image capture techniques in response to a variety of settings. Topics range from determining exposure latitude, lens selection, camera selection, lighting choices, and lighting styles. Prerequisite(s): CT 234 and CT 248.

CT 322. Advanced Editing for Digital Filmmaking. 3 Hours.

In this course, students learn the art of integrating video, graphics, and music into one final seamless product. Students also learn about codecs, formats, file structure, and distribution. Course topics include how to import, edit, and tie content together so that a cohesive product can be exported for a variety of multimedia platforms. Color correction, motion graphics and advanced filtering are just a few of the skills used to enhance the video. This course challenges students to perform at an elevated level through the creative use of industry standard tools. Students will need to earn a "C+" or higher to advance in the Video Production Program. Prerequisite(s): CT 243 and CT 338.

CT 325. TV Studio/Remote Production II. 6 Hours.

The skills acquired in CT 224 lay the foundation for this challenging course. Students focus on all aspects of managing live remote productions. Mastering system integration and crew management affords students certain opportunities usually reserved for seasoned professionals. By producing live events with industry standard equipment such as Grass Valley Switchers and EVS (Elvis) replay systems, successful students are prepared to enter the world of professional remote broadcasts. NESCom’s strategic partnerships with industry broadcasters provide students valuable on-air experience and help them form beneficial contacts. This demanding course requires strong interpersonal skills and a significant time commitment. Prerequisite(s): CT 224 GPA 2.0 and CT 243 GPA 2.0.

CT 326. Technical Foundations of Audio Systems. 3 Hours.

This course explores advanced audio theory including phase, acoustics, loudness, electricity fundamentals, power and grounding. It also addresses concerns in the design and interconnection of digital and analog audio equipment. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): (CT 270 and CT 271) or (CT 250 and CT 251).

CT 327. Audio III, Hybrid Mixing Techniques. 2 Hours.

In this course, students engage in music and post-production mixes, building technical and listening skills. Also, a culminating cartoon project applies learned mix and recording skills in a complex post-production project. In order to move on in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): (CT 250 and CT 251) or (CT 270 and CT 271).

CT 328. Principles of Effective Recording. 2 Hours.

This course focuses primarily on recording in music and post-production environments. Concepts covered include advanced instruction in microphones, preamplifiers, equalization and compression, and the recording process. Students hone their communication and record keeping skills to ensure an enjoyable studio experience for all and a quality final product. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher. Prerequisite(s): (CT 250 and CT 251) or (CT 270 and CT 271).

CT 329. Applications of Effective Recording. 3 Hours.

This course focuses primarily on recording in music and post-production environments. Topics include advanced instruction in signal flow, microphone choice and technique, preamplifier options, equalization and compression uses, and recording software. Regular recording of performance groups ensure that students have a full understanding of the tracking process. Students hone session management, communication, and record keeping skills to ensure an enjoyable studio experience for all and a quality final product. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): (CT 250 and CT 251) or (CT 270 and CT 271).

CT 330. Communications Technology Internship. 3-9 Hours.

This experiential course is a supervised work experience with participating employers for Communications Technology students. It provides for the application of classroom learning in a professional work environment. Prerequisite(s): (Major=BS Communications Technology - Audio Engineering or Major=BS Communications Technology - Live Sound Tech or Major=BS Communications Technology - Video Production or Major=BS Communications Technology - WebMedia) and College Level=Junior.

CT 332. Communications Technology Internship II. 1-9 Hour.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience must have a strong communications element related to the student’s major. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

CT 335. Electronic Music Technology. 3 Hours.

The course covers the practices and principles of analog and digital sound synthesis, sequencing, sampling, and MIDI. Use of both hardware and software devices are employed and students learn techniques to create music tracks with various controllers and synthesized instruments. Electronic Music Technology also includes an overview of industry and technology innovators, an introduction to sound design methods and applications, and a survey of electronic musical equipment commonly found in internship and employment scenarios. Prerequisite(s): CT 215 and CT 326 and CT 328.

CT 336. Sound Design for Film, Gaming & Other Media. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to envisioning and producing sounds for visual media, including film, television, computer-based animation, websites, and games. Applications involve creating and refining cut effects, ambiences, sound iconography, and an introduction to Foley effects. The course will focus on the practices and skills required to utilize computer-based post-production software and will prepare students for the role of sound designer and to work under a supervising sound editor.

CT 337. Sound Reinforcement Techniques II. 2 Hours.

In this course, students expand their experience with digital consoles, mixing techniques, power distribution, cable construction, and the design and interconnection of modern audio systems by participating at live events. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher. Prerequisite(s): CT 250 and CT 251.

CT 338. Camera in Motion. 3 Hours.

Having set a foundation of solid production skills in the first few video based courses, students are now ready to go one step further and put their camera into motion. Much of the work done up until now has been based on compositing non-moving shots. That changes as CT 236 introduces all of the industry standard tools for moving your camera, characters, and action through a scene. Students will learn how to operate Dolly systems, StediCams, jib/cranes, slider systems, and more importantly, you will learn why you use them in your production work. Students' cinematography will have a new sense of professionalism as the camera comes alive in this platforms-based course. Prerequisite(s): CT 205 and CT 234.

CT 340. Introduction to Post Production, Audio & Video. 3 Hours.

Students seeking to enter the field of audio post production need to be exposed to and be able to assist with its visual side. This course will explore the fundamentals of editing video and combine it with the audio portion of their work. From file management to compression schemes and from editing on a timeline to distribution methods, students will look at the various factions of video, including commercials, films, live productions, and television shows. The course will also look at how the pieces of audio post production work with these variations of video, with a snapshot of Foley work, ADR, SFX mixing, and surround sound editing. Prerequisite(s): CT 326 and CT 328.

CT 342. Video Compositing and Motion Graphics II. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to enable students to composite footage shot with a video camera with assets created in a 3D modeler or 2D graphics program. Students will learn techniques of motion tracking, rotoscoping, advanced virtual camera movement, and photogrammetry in order to create realistic composites and special effects. Students will also expand their knowledge of programs such as Photoshop and After Effects and Maxon's Cinema 4D. The goal of this course is to take previously learned techniques for creating news graphics and expand that skill set for use in digital film making. Prerequisite(s): CT 105 and CT 243.

CT 345. Photography II. 3 Hours.

This intermediate level photography is a continuation of CT 245. Through lectures and hands on labs, students learn about raw acquisition, picture style settings, handheld light meters, strobes, wireless triggers, types of lights, and lighting set-ups. Students also learn various styles found in photojournalism, sports journalism, and portrait and commercial photography. Intermediate image manipulation using Photoshop and printmaking is also covered in this course. Prerequisite(s): CT 245.

CT 350. Broadcast Audio Engineering Event Practicum. 1 Hour.

In this course students receive hands-on training on multiple sound reinforcement consoles. Key components of this course include advanced live sound signal flow, design, commissioning & setup of complex digital live audio systems, and a survey of broadcast mixing fundamentals. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): (CT 326 and CT 327) or (CT 326 and CT 337).

CT 351. Broadcast Audio Engineering. 3 Hours.

In this course students receive hands-on training on multiple sound reinforcement consoles. Key topics in this course include advanced live sound signal flow, design, commissioning and setup of complex digital live audio systems, and a survey of broadcast mixing fundamentals. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): (CT 326 and CT 327) or (CT 326 and CT 337).

CT 352. Speaker Systems: Design & Optimization. 3 Hours.

This course focuses upon sound system design and optimization. Students investigate processing, amplifiers, loudspeakers, and system analysis tools. They pay special attention to system optimization, including impedance, phase, and coverage concerns. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): (CT 326 and CT 327) or (CT 326 or CT 337).

CT 353. Narrative Directing. 3 Hours.

This course fosters an appreciation of the many hats worn by directors as they guide productions to the finished product. At any given time, directors may be expected to adapt a written manuscript into a visual form, shape acting and set the scene from shot to shot. Directing also involves working with crewmembers to keep the flow of the story consistent through numerous takes. Prerequisite(s): CT 315.

CT 357. 3D Animation. 3 Hours.

Students in 3D Animation learn industry standard software being used today to create video games, television shows and major motion pictures around the world. Blender allows for the design and rendering of high end imagery, whether it is integrated with live action video or used as stand alone animation. Using the basic skills of three-dimensional work - modeling, layout, and animation - students create vivid atmospheres and physically simulate models through these environments. Prerequisite(s): IT 311.

CT 362. Pro Tools II Post. 3 Hours.

This course builds intermediate Pro Tools skills in audio post production. Students learn the components of a HDx system, advanced mixing and editing options, the use of alternate production tools, time operations, alignment techniques, writing and editing automation, recording and comping multiple takes, elastic audio, virtual instruments, MIDI, and beat detective. Students complete hands-on projects involving editing and mixing audio for video in the Pro Tools environment. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of C+ or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): (CT 326 and CT 328) or (CT 326 and CT 337).

CT 363. Pro Tools II Music. 3 Hours.

This course builds intermediate Pro Tools skills that are necessary in music production. Students learn the components of an HDx system, advanced mixing and editing options, the use of alternate production tools, time operations, alignment techniques, writing and editing automation, recording and comping multiple takes, plug-ins such as Auto Tune, virtual instruments, MIDI, and beat detective. Students complete hands-on projects involving recording and mixing music in the Pro Tools environment. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): (CT 326 and CT 328) or (CT 326 and CT 337).

CT 404. Stage Wiring & Electronic Troubleshooting. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the various technologies found in a live concert, theatrical performance, or broadcast event. Topics include workplace safety, troubleshooting, electricity, frequency considerations in wiring, Ohm’s law, ground loops, and intercoms. Projects include soldering, cable construction, and building at least one electronic test equipment project. Prerequisite(s): (CT 326 and CT 327) or (CT 326 and CT 337).

CT 415. WebMedia Senior Project. 3 Hours.

WebMedia Senior Project is an advanced course offering the student the experience of planning, designing, developing and deploying a professional rich Internet application leveraging all of the skills and techniques learned in previous courses.

CT 416. Fundamentals of Audio Post. 3 Hours.

This course offers foundation level training in audio post-production for TV, film, and other media. Processes such as dialogue editing, ADR, sound effects editing and design, Foley recording, music editing and mixing (re-recording) are investigated in lecture and practiced through personal lab projects. Prerequisite(s): CT 326 and CT 328.

CT 417. Advanced Audio Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course instructs students in advanced music production procedures including the setup and use of the API Vision for tracking and mix sessions, recording and mix techniques, troubleshooting in the studio, working with producers and artists, use of software to edit recorded performances, and mastering. Prerequisite(s): CT 326 and CT 328.

CT 419. Live Sound Mixing. 3 Hours.

In this course, students explore the duties of the mix engineer such as advancing a show, system calibration, and mixing. Additional topics include transducer selection, design of event-appropriate systems, advanced monitor engineering, and system optimization. With a special emphasis on show flow and technique, students mix pre-recorded material in weekly labs. Students also learn aesthetics issues such as loudness, mix musicality, and stylistic appropriateness. Other course activities include reading and writing assignments, advanced ear training, an introduction to event management, and participation in NESCom events as mix engineers and event leads. Prerequisite(s): CT 351 and CT 352.

CT 420. Live Sound Mixing Event Practicum. 1 Hour.

This practicum provides experience that supplements and reinforces the learning and undertakings of CT 419, Live Sound Mixing. In order to continue in the Audio Engineering and/or Live Sound programs, students must earn a grade of "C+" or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): CT 350 and CT 351 and CT 352.

CT 429. Advanced Audio Post. 4 Hours.

In Advanced Audio Post students gain further experience in the production of audio for visual medias. Students complete extensive projects and receive significant studio time to record, edit, and mix sound effects, Foley, dialogue, and music.

CT 430. Live Performance Production. 3 Hours.

As a capstone course, Live Performance Production puts graduating students’ knowledge to test. Functioning as Event Leads, students individually advance and manage multiple NESCom events. Development of professional skills is central to the course, including personal organization, time management, interpersonal communication, and troubleshooting. Expansion of mixing skills is also present in the course, through mix labs and event participation. Also present is independent, group, and class study of specific live audio technologies. Prerequisite(s): CT 419.

CT 431. Advanced Music Production. 4 Hours.

As the capstone course in the Music Production curriculum, students have the opportunity to put learned skills to use by recording, mixing and mastering a complete musical project. Students are responsible for selecting an artist, helping them prepare and record their material, then mix, master, and deliver results in a production-ready package. Students receive significant studio time to complete the project to the satisfaction of both the artist and faculty advisor. Prerequisite(s): CT 417 and College Level=Senior.

CT 432. Live Performance Production Event Practicum. 1 Hour.

This practicum provides students an opportunity to implement knowledge and skills gained throughout the live sound program at an event environment. It parallels the capstone course, CT 430. Prerequisite(s): CT 419 and CT 420.

CT 441. Video Workshop. 3 Hours.

In Video Workshop the class works with the instructor to select an interesting and challenging, long-format project for a client and then creates a finished product that is of broadcast quality. Projects completed in prior semesters have been distributed nationally. Students produce, script, shoot and edit all aspects of the selected project and then assist in its mass production and distribution. This course ultimately provides students with a competitive advantage in the market. Due to the nature of this course, there are high expectations for students since their work represents the skill sets they have acquired throughout their time in the Video Production Program. Prerequisite(s): CT 322 and CT 338.

CT 499. Topic/. 1-3 Hour.

This course listing is intended to provide the opportunity for faculty to offer advanced courses of interest in Communications Technology that would not normally be part of the University curriculum.