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B.S. Healthcare Studies

Program Curriculum

Students must earn an overall 2.0 cumulative grade-point average as well as 2.0 in major courses, 120 credit hours. Transfer students should complete a minimum of 30 credit hours at Husson.

General Education Courses
BA 210Economics Overview for Non-Business Majors3
Select one of the following:3
Speech
Professional Communications
EH 123Rhetoric and Composition I3
EH 124Rhetoric and Composition II3
EH 200Approaches to Literature3
EH 360Writing in the Health Professions3
HE 111The Husson Experience ***1
MI 111Introduction to Microcomputing3
MI 210Basic Database Design and Implementation3
MI 214Microcomputer Spreadsheet Applications3
MS 132Probability and Statistics3
MS 141Contemporary College Algebra4
PY 111General Psychology3
PY 141Human Growth and Development3
SC 104Organismal Biology3
SC 120
  & SL 120
Functional Anatomy and Physiology
   and Functional Anatomy and Physiology Lab
4
SC 224Research Design3
SC 292Epidemiology3
History Elective3
Fine Arts Elective3
Ethics Elective3
Foreign Cult. & Conv. Elective3
Global Elective3
Psychology Elective3
Open Electives 12
Professional Courses
HS 101Introduction to Health Care Studies3
HS 121Medical Terminology3
HS 299Topic/3
HS 301Introduction to Public Health3
HS 311Healthcare Management and Organization3
HS 321Healthcare Law and Ethics3
HS 411Health Economics and Policy3
HS 421Health Care Studies Senior Experience3
HS 491Health Care Studies Internship3-6
HS Electives9
Total Hours120-123

Suggested Course Sequence

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
EH 1233MI 1113
HE 111***1Global Elective3
SC 1043PY 1113
Ethics Elective3EH 1243
MS 1414History Elective3
 14 15
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
HS 1013BA 2103
MS 1323HS 1213
EH 2003MI 2143
SC 120
  & SL 120
4PY 1413
Fine Arts Elective3Open Elective3
 16 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
EH 3603HS 3013
HS 3113HS 3213
SC 2243SC 2923
HS Elective3MI 2103
CM 100 or 2213Open Elective3
 15 15
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
HS 299 (Global Health)3HS 4213
HS 4113HS 4913-6
HS Elective3HS Elective3
Psychology Elective3Foreign Culture and Conversation Elective3
Open Elective3Open Elective3
 15 15-18
Total Hours: 120-123
***

Credit may not be required for degree completion.

Courses

EH 080. Reading and Vocabulary for International Students. 3 Hours.

Reading & Vocabulary for International Students: This course develops non-native English speakers’ general reading fluency and their discrete reading knowledge and skills, and teaches them how to explore new vocabulary while developing their knowledge of academic vocabulary. Placement is determined by diagnostic writing and vocabulary tests. The course does not count towards the degree. A minimum grade of C is required.

EH 081. Writing I for International Students. 3 Hours.

Writing I for International Students: This course develops the general English writing skills of non-native English speakers who may not be ready for full-time university coursework in their major fields of study through the practice of general and academic English writing “genres” and an exploration of the writing process. Placement is determined by diagnostic writing and vocabulary tests. The course does not count towards the degree. A minimum grade of C is required.

EH 082. Writing II for International Students. 3 Hours.

Writing II for International Students: This course develops the academic English writing skills of non-native English speakers through the practice of specific academic English writing tasks often undertaken at Husson University, an exploration of how to write differently with different audiences and for different purposes, and an analysis of the basic writing conventions of their major fields of study. Placement is determined by diagnostic writing and vocabulary tests or successful completion of EH 080 and EH 081. The course does not count towards the degree. A minimum grade of C is required.

EH 083. Focused Listening for International Students. 3 Hours.

Focused Listening for International Students: This course develops the aural and oral fluency and skills of non-native English speakers who are not yet ready for full-time university coursework in their major fields of study through extensive listening and speaking exercises, an introduction to the types of academic English listening and speaking tasks they will encounter at any university, an exploration of the pragmatics of English and how they differ from their own language pragmatics, and activities related to the different ways that English is pronounced in the many places it is spoken. Placement is determined by diagnostic listening and speaking tests. The course does not count towards the degree. A minimum grade of C is required.

EH 084. Oral Communication I for International Students. 3 Hours.

Oral Communication I for International Students: This course develops the academic English listening and speaking skills of non-native English speakers who may not be ready for full-time university coursework in their major fields of study through the practice of realistic academic English listening and speaking tasks, the investigation of how spoken English is used differently with different audiences and for different purposes, and an exploration of the effective use of English to navigate the institution. Placement is determined by diagnostic listening and speaking tests. The course does not count towards the degree. A minimum grade of C is required.

EH 085. Oral Communication II for International Students. 3 Hours.

Oral Communication II for International Students: This course prepares non-native English speakers for the rigors of university coursework through the study and practice of relevant academic English listening and speaking tasks, guides them through an exploration of “World Englishes” and how to use them or not with different audiences and for different purposes, and improves their understanding of the pragmatics of advanced conversational English. Placement is determined by diagnostic listening and speaking tests or successful completion of EH 083 and EH 084. The course does not count towards the degree. A minimum grade of C is required.

EH 086. Modular ESL (English as a Second Language). 1-6 Hour.

Modular ESL is a one-to-six credit course which prepares non-native English speakers for success at Husson University through the completion of assignments in some or all of six different areas of Academic English: Oral & Aural English, Reading & Writing, Grammar, Vocabulary, Language Pragmatics, and Academic Thinking. The number of credits a student must take is determined by writing, vocabulary, listening, and speaking tests. One credit-hour is equivalent to 40 unit-hours of independent study, work with the teacher, and occasional collaborative in-class work. These tests are also used to determine what portion of the unit hours must be spent on assignments in each of the six areas of study and which specific assignments may be required. The course does not count towards the degree. A minimum grade of C is required.

EH 091. Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

In this course students practice a variety of writing strategies and sentence-level skills in a workshop atmosphere that prepares them for college-level writing. Thesis and paragraph development, grammar, punctuation, spelling and document format are among the topics covered in preparation for academic writing. Connections between reading and writing are emphasized. Placement is determined by a diagnostic writing sample. The course does not count toward the degree. A minimum grade of C is required.

EH 091L. English Writing Workshop Lab. 1 Hour.

This course is a writing workshop lab that is required for all students taking a developmental section of EH 123. The lab is structured using the studio model. This model provides a “third space” where students can explore, in more detail, the skills required to complete the standard EH 123 curriculum and, more importantly, the expectations of “college-level writing,” which includes not only specific writing abilities but also the “habits of mind” that allow students to use writing as a means of solving unforeseen problems. This lab is also connected to the writing center, which provides tutoring opportunities for students enrolled in the writing lab.

EH 092. Writing Workshop for International Students. 3 Hours.

In this course students for whom English is a second language practice a variety of writing strategies and sentence-level skills in a workshop atmosphere that prepares them for college-level writing. Thesis and paragraph development, grammar, punctuation, spelling, and document format are among topics covered in preparation for academic writing. Connections between reading and writing are emphasized. Placement is determined by a diagnostic writing sample. The course does not count toward the degree. A minimum grade of C is required.

EH 093. Academic English for International Students. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for students for whom English is a second language. Placement is determined by diagnostic written and oral evaluation. Students will practice a variety of writing strategies and sentence-level skills in a workshop atmosphere to prepare them for college-level writing. Thesis and paragraph development, grammar, punctuation, spelling, and document format are among topics covered. Connections between reading and writing are emphasized. Development of academic vocabulary will be stressed. Listening and note-taking strategies will be practiced. Both linguistic and cultural aspects of oral classroom participation will be taught.

EH 094. Advanced English Workshop for International Students. 3 Hours.

This course is a more advanced continuation of EH 092, emphasizing additional development of vocabulary, writing and oral participation in the American academic environment. Placement is determined by diagnostic assessment. Students whose English skills warrant it may be placed directly into this class and bypass EH 092.

EH 103. Rhetoric and Composition I Studio. 1 Hour.

A supplement to Rhetoric and Composition I (EH 123), this course is required for students placed as basic writers and optional for all other students. Placed students must pass both this course and Rhetoric and Composition I in order to move on to Rhetoric and Composition II (EH 124). Class meets once a week. Class size is limited to eight. Curriculum is coordinated with EH 123 instructor and tailored to the needs of students. Pass-fail only. (Note: credit does not apply toward graduation.).

EH 104. Rhetoric and Composition II Studio. 1 Hour.

A supplement to Rhetoric and Composition II (EH 124), this course is required for students placed as basic writers and optional for all other students. Placed students must pass both this course and Rhetoric and Composition II. Class meets once a week. Class size is limited to eight. Curriculum is coordinated with EH 124 instructor and tailored to the needs of students. Pass-Fail only. (Note: credit does not apply toward graduation.). Prerequisite(s): EH 123 and EH 103.

EH 123. Rhetoric and Composition I. 3 Hours.

This course teaches techniques for effective oral and written communication. In a workshop environment that features continual instructor and peer evaluation, students develop a process approach to writing and speaking. Students will write in a variety of genres and will reinforce rhetorical strategies pertaining to audience awareness while practicing oral delivery skills. A grade of C or better is required to pass the course.

EH 124. Rhetoric and Composition II. 3 Hours.

This course teaches techniques for effective oral and written communication. In a workshop environment that features continual instructor and peer evaluation, students develop a process approach to writing and speaking. Logical argumentation, academic conventions, and research-related skills are the primary focus. Public speeches are based on written assignments that incorporate various source materials. As students explore connections between the written and spoken word, the significance of nonverbal language and listening skills are emphasized. A grade of C or better is required to pass the course. Prerequisite(s): EH 123 or EH 111.

EH 199. Topic/. 1 Hour.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer introductory courses in English that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty.

EH 200. Approaches to Literature. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the study of literature and the fundamental of literary research. Students explore fiction, poetry, and drama from both the western and non-western worlds. The creative process is explored through reading, discussion, research and writing. Additionally, the key themes of power, identity, justice and adaptation and explored in relation literature. Prerequisite(s): (EH 123 and EH 124) or EH 111.

EH 229. Introduction to Poetry. 3 Hours.

This course provides a critical exploration into the sound and sense of verse in English, from is traditional forms (e.g. the sonnet, villanelle and sestina) to more recent styles (e.g. free verse, experimental and avant grade poetry). Special attention to the devices of meter, rhyme, rhetoric and wordplay will enhance students' understanding of the complementary relationship between poetic content (what a poem says) and form (how is is said). Prerequisite(s): EH 200 or EH 112.

EH 230. Introduction to the Short Story. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the narrative methods and storytelling strategies that define short fiction. Readings include short stories by traditional and contemporary writers from diverse national and cultural backgrounds. Attention will be given to individual stories and their function in the broader context of entire collections of short fiction. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 232. Intro to Drama/Play Production. 3 Hours.

This course examines dramatic writing and performance as a vehicle of cultural communication from the ancient world to the present day. Topics studied include forms and definitions of drama, history of play production, staging and criticism. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 233. Introduction to the Novel. 3 Hours.

This course provides a study of the novel, including its aesthetic development, critical reception, and social function, from its origins in the eighteenth-century to its contemporary practitioners. Specific topics and texts may vary according to instructor and student preference and may include Bradford, Bradstreet, Edwards, Hawthorne, Emerson, Melville, Thoreau and Douglas. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 234. American Literature I. 3 Hours.

This course presents a survey of American writing from the Colonial period to the Civil War with focus on the intellectual movements and literary output of Puritanism, Native American literature, Romanticism, the Transcendentalists and slavery narratives. Specific topics and texts may vary according to instructor and student preference and may include such writers as Bradford, Bradstreet, Edwards, Hawthorne, Emerson, Melville, Thoreau and Douglas. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 235. American Literature II. 3 Hours.

This course presents an overview of American Literature from the end of the Civil War to 1945. It may include authors and works from the Gilded Age, Progressivism, World War I, the Expatriates, the Jazz Age and the Harlem Renaissance. The course studies the role of literature to express and influence social, economic, and cultural realities of the United States. Specific topics and texts vary according to instructor and student preference and may include Twain, Bierce, Dickinson and Whitman. Prerequisite(s): EH 200 or EH 112.

EH 241. British Literature I. 3 Hours.

This course provides a study of canonical authors and works of the British Isles from medieval times to the modern era. Depending on instructor and student preference, texts and authors may include Beowulf, Chaucer, Langland, Malory, Donny, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Austen, Wordsworth, the Brontes, Tennyson, Arnold, Conrad and Woolf. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 242. British Literature II. 3 Hours.

This course surveys British literature from 1660 to the present. It will combine historical, cultural, and linguistic approaches in the study of various literary genres, considering along the way what shapes definitions of language, tradition, nation, and literature. Readings, class discussions, research and writing assignments aim to give students a broad look at a number of canonical writers, intellectual movements, and influential changes that have accompanied the development of British writing since the Restoration. The course is intended for majors and non-majors alike. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 251. World Literature I. 3 Hours.

This course surveys significant writings in Eastern and Western tradition, from ancient Babylonian civilization to the English Restoration. Selected texts depend on instructor and student interest and may include Gilgamesh, Greco-Roman mythology, Homer’s Odyssey, the Old and New Testaments, Indian epic, Dante’s Divine Comedy and Japanese haiku. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 252. World Literature II. 3 Hours.

The second of two world literature surveys, this course concentrates on literary works from the English Restoration to the modern era. The primary goal for the course is to define the role of literature as it occurs through a wide range of social, cultural and geographical contexts. Selected texts depend on student and instructor interest and may include Voltaire, Borges, Mahfouz, Tagore, Mishima, Garcia Marquez and Achebe. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 275. Creative Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the writing of creative short fiction, poetry, and personal essay. As students workshop their own writing and offer feedback to the writing of classmates, they are exposed to a variety of writing techniques in all three genres in order to help develop their own writing style and voice. Emphasis is placed on the importance of revision and writing as a process. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 299. Topic/. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer introductory courses in English that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 300. Literacies in American Society. 3 Hours.

This course will investigate literacy from a sociocultural and linguistic perspective. Students will be defining and operationalizing the term “literacy” and striving to understand the various types of literacy that currently exist in American society. Furthermore, students will study how being adept in various literacies define group membership and serve as a gateway of access to various levels of American social stratification. Furthermore, beginning with pre-school aged children, students will investigate how literacy and the value of literacy is transmitted culturally and how that transmission weighs heavily on future involvement in literacy events. Prerequisite(s): EH 123 and EH 124.

EH 301. The Modern Novel. 3 Hours.

This course examines the novel as it develops in western and European culture from about 1800 through the present. Students will read approximately eight to ten novels per semester from a variety of cultural and historical periods. Students will become acquainted with the relevant historiographical sources, theory and issues pertaining to the period and write a variety of short papers for this course. Prerequisite(s): EH 112 or EH 200.

EH 302. The Nature of Language. 3 Hours.

This survey course will introduce students to the study of the nature of human language. During the course, students will be exposed to origins of human language, myths about language, language principles, writing systems, phonology/phonetics, morphology, syntax, psycholinguistics, social linguistics, first and second language acquisition, historical linguistics, and language and politics, semantics and pragmatics. The goal of this course is to expose the students the complexity of human language. Prerequisite(s): EH 123 and EH 124 and EH 200.

EH 303. Canadian Literature. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the major thematic concerns that have shaped Canadian literature from the pre-Confederation era to the present day. Literary examples will be drawn from works concerned with ethnicity, colonization, the wilderness, identity formation, and the Francophone/Anglophone divide. Primary attention will be given to texts focusing on the world of work as it has been envisioned by Canadians. Selected poetry and prose from diverse, canonical authors such as Frances Brooke, Susanna Moodie, Isabella Valancy Crawford, Charles Sangster, John Richardson, Joy Kogawa, Alice Munroe, Margaret Atwood, David Adams Richard, and Yann Martel will be examined. Depending on the season, a day trip to King’s Landing – a living museum of Canadian history about three hours from Bangor – could be undertaken. Prerequisite(s): EH 112 or EH 200.

EH 311. Topics in Professional Communication. 3 Hours.

This course builds upon the rhetorical foundation established in EH 123 and EH 124 to introduce students to the skills central to effective professional writing. These skills include an ability to apply composition theory and advanced rhetorical strategies to various professional contexts, such as business, engineering, and professional publishing. In addition, students will learn how to conduct research in a variety of professions, communicating these findings in specific professional genres, which include short stories, poems, novels, business letters, memos, internal and external proposals, analytic reports, and scientific articles. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 312. Film as Literature. 3 Hours.

This course is intended as an introduction to film studies course. Students will learn to read film by analyzing structure, narrative form, diegetic and non-diegetic elements, mise en scene, generic conventions, motifs, cinematography and editing techniques as they pertain to a given theme followed through a chronological development of film in a given cultural context,(this varies depending upon instructor). The course will stress writing about film through scene analysis papers, journals, and midterm and final essay exams. A formal presentation is also required. Prerequisite(s): EH 123 and EH 124 and EH 200.

EH 320. Literature and Medicine. 3 Hours.

This course approaches ethical, social, and psychological issues in health care through the study of literature. Texts from various genres will frame exploration of the caregiver-patient relationship from alternating perspectives and in diverse social environments, historical contexts, and cultural surroundings. The course emphasizes skills of critical close-reading, research, oral and written argument through class discussion, essays, and presentations. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 322. Group Leadership and Conference Techniques. 3 Hours.

This course involves experiential learning of leadership, interpersonal communication, and conference activities. Students develop and present individual and group programs based on issues and policies within their degree programs, and/or professional and civic organizations. Prerequisite(s): EH 121 and EH 221.

EH 330. Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. 3 Hours.

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the theories upon which advanced literary and cultural analyses are founded. These theories help scholars discover and articulate the role literature plays in our understanding of social associations and cultural tradition, institutions that shape the values and norms through which we define truth and, so, meaning. Prerequisite(s): (EH 123 and EH 124) or College Level=Sophomore.

EH 342. Native American Literatures of North America. 3 Hours.

Students will examine Native American Literatures, including traditional stories, non-fiction, fiction and poetry from authors of different Native American tribes. A variety of themes, including Native American identity and the role literature plays in cultural change, will be covered. Students will investigate these issues through a series of reading journals, two longer response papers, a significant research essay, and two formal presentations. Prerequisite(s): EH 123 and EH 124 and EH 200.

EH 350. The History of the English Language. 3 Hours.

The History of the English Language offers a study of Old, Middle, and Modern English. Furthermore, the course will address how the nature and mechanisms of language change over time, as well as the social, political, and other historical conditions that relate to such changes. The course will also attend to phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicography, and semantics, as well as to the broader cultures of the relevant periods. Prerequisite(s): EH 123 and EH 124.

EH 352. Advanced Writing Internship. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to combine training for writing tutors with practical experience in the Writing Center. Students will study rhetoric and composition theory and explore issues that interfere with successful student writing, both their own and that of others. Acquired knowledge will be applied in both classroom role-playing situations and actual tutorial experiences in the Writing Center. Emphasis will be on preparing students for possible future roles as peer tutors in the Writing Center. Prerequisite(s): EH 112.

EH 360. Writing in the Health Professions. 3 Hours.

Writing in the Health Professions is designed to introduce you to various techniques and methods of communicating within the health professions. The required assignments expose you to the documents you will encounter in your physical therapy, occupational therapy, or other health science courses and careers. Through these assignments, the readings, and class discussions, you will develop the clear and focused writing style required in a technical or scientific context. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 411. Seminar in Literature. 3 Hours.

This is an upper-level seminar course of variable content determined by current faculty research and student interests. Previous topics include Shakespeare, Virginia Woolf, Twentieth Century Poetry and Literature of Place. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 453. Major Plays of Shakespeare. 3 Hours.

This course will examine Shakespeare’s major plays. The plays will be examined in context of Shakespeare’s background and English Renaissance thought. Plays covered in this course may vary, and students will examine selections from Shakespeare’s histories, tragedies, romances, and/or comedies. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

EH 499. Topic/. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer upper level literature courses in English that are not normally included in the ongoing curriculum at Husson University. Topics will depend upon the interests of students and faculty. Prerequisite(s): EH 123 and EH 124 and EH 200.