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Programs in Accounting

Husson Accounting majors begin their study of accounting in their first year, and then progress through a series of advanced courses that provide in-depth exposure to all aspects of the profession. Faculty are experienced practitioners who combine practical knowledge with up-to-date theory in their teaching. Small class size ensures that students receive the attention they need to do their best. These unique aspects of the Husson Accounting Programs produce graduates who are well trained and ready to enter the profession.

Requirements for Accounting Majors

All Accounting majors must earn an overall 2.0 cumulative grade-point average as well as a 2.0 in their Ac prefix courses. In addition, transfer students must complete a minimum of 15 credit hours in Ac prefix courses at Husson.

AC Courses

AC 120. Introduction to Accounting. 3 Hours.

This course is for nonaccounting majors and introduces the student to accounting principles and concepts. Emphasis will be placed on completion of the accounting cycle, cash control, and payroll accounting.

AC 121. Principles of Accounting I. 3 Hours.

This introductory course covers fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. It is designed to meet the needs of business students as well as the accounting major. Emphasis is on developing the technical procedures of the accounting cycle including journalizing, posting, recording adjusting entries, understanding merchandising accounting, and preparing financial statements. Students are also introduced to cash control and financial statement analysis.

AC 122. Principles of Accounting II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of the study of basic accounting principles and procedures, the course includes receivables and payables, fixed assets, intangibles, natural resources, inventory methods, payroll accounting, and special journals and subsidiary ledgers. Students are also introduced to the partnership and corporate form of organization. Projects are incorporated into the assignments. Prerequisite(s): AC 121.

AC 201. Intermediate Accounting I. 3 Hours.

The first accounting course at the professional level for the accounting major, this course begins with a comprehensive review of basic accounting principles and financial statement preparation. The course provides an intensive study of the concepts of future and present value, current assets and current liabilities, the various methods of inventory accounting and costing, plant assets and intangible assets. Prerequisite(s): AC 122.

AC 202. Intermediate Accounting II. 3 Hours.

This course continues the in-depth study of accounting topics in financial accounting, including accounting for income taxes, long-term investments, and long-term liabilities. An intensive study is made of the statement of cash flows and accounting for all phases of corporations including formation, retained earnings, dividends, convertible securities, and earnings per share. Prerequisite(s): AC 201.

AC 211. Managerial Accounting. 3 Hours.

Managerial accounting involves the use of accounting information to make business decisions. Topics covered include cost concepts, cost-volume-profit relationships, capital budgeting, master budgets, cost variances and present value analysis, as well as financial statement analysis. Prerequisite(s): AC 121.

AC 251. Accounting Internship. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in an accounting related position at a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

AC 252. Accounting Internship II. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in an accounting related position at a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

AC 253. Accounting Internship III. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in an accounting related position at a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

AC 254. Accounting Internship IV. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in an accounting related position at a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

AC 255. Accounting Internship V. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in an accounting related position at a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

AC 256. Accounting Internship VI. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in an accounting related position at a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

AC 301. Advanced Accounting I. 3 Hours.

Advanced Accounting I deals with advanced and specialized topics in financial accounting. An in-depth study is made of accounting for pensions and leases and of accounting for partnerships, including formation and operation, dissolution, and liquidation. The course also provides an introduction to such specialized topics as foreign operations, governmental and fund accounting, accounting changes, and error correction. Prerequisite(s): AC 202.

AC 302. Advanced Accounting II. 3 Hours.

Advanced Accounting II concentrates on an in-depth study of business combinations and the equity method of accounting for a subsidiary on the parent’s unconsolidated statements. Accounting for business combinations by the purchase method is covered and the preparation of consolidated statements is emphasized with a thorough treatment of eliminations of intercompany transactions. Currently developing advanced topics are also covered as time permits. Prerequisite(s): AC 202.

AC 331. Cost Accounting. 3 Hours.

Topics covered include basic cost control concepts, manufacturing statements, accounting for material inventory, factory overhead costs, job order costing, process costing, activity based costing, and process costing. Students are also introduced to cost estimation methods and cost-volume-profit analysis. With assigned projects, budgeting and variances are studied, along with decision-making models. Prerequisite(s): AC 122.

AC 352. Forensic and Investigative Accounting. 3 Hours.

This course covers important topics associated with modern forensic and investigative accounting. Topics include fraud auditing, litigation support, valuation, cybercrime, and other key forensic topics. The objectives include understanding the principles and practices used by public accountants, internal auditors, and others used to examine financial and related information. Prerequisite(s): AC 202.

AC 371. Accounting Information Systems. 3 Hours.

This course explores information systems that provide accounting and other information to make effective and efficient decisions. Emphasis is given to the interatction between the systems analyst, the financial accountant, the internal auditor, the external auditor, and other decision-makers. Overall data flow in systems is studied with an emphasis on flow and logic concepts and designing appropriate internal controls for these systems. Prerequisite(s): AC 122 and MI 111.

AC 441. Federal Taxation I. 3 Hours.

The student is introduced to the basic theory of taxation, particularly as it deals with the individual. Among the topics examined are the computation of gross income, gains and losses, sales and exchanges of property, and various business and personal deductions. Prerequisite(s): AC 122.

AC 442. Federal Taxation II. 3 Hours.

The taxation of corporations, partnerships, and estates and trusts is examined in-depth, along with other selected topics related to taxation of the business entity. Also covered are estate and gift transfer taxes with time devoted to family tax planning, international taxation, and the taxation of exempt organizations. Prerequisite(s): AC 122.

AC 461. Auditing Concepts and Methods. 3 Hours.

The responsibilities of the auditor are examined in-depth in respect to the client, the firm and the public. The course includes a study of ethics, auditing standards and development techniques of the audit program, and the auditor’s report. An extensive case study is also required. Prerequisite(s): AC 202.

AC 471. Accounting for Nonprofit Organizations. 3 Hours.

This course consists of the study of fund accounting and the financial statements of state and local governments, hospitals, universities and other nonprofit entities. General financial principles and fund accounting principles are compared. Specific topics covered include budgets for operations, capital improvements, general funds, revenue funds, debt service funds, trust and agency funds, and proprietary funds. Prerequisite(s): AC 202.

AC 483. Financial Acctg & Reporting Adv Problems. 3 Hours.

This course covers current official pronouncements and procedures accepted by the AICPA and the FASB. Comprehensive in depth and inter-area problems are explored and solved; topics include accounting theory, pensions, leases, inventories, current assets and current liabilities, fixed assets, deferred taxes, stockholders’ equity, foreign currency transactions and translations, investments, and partnerships. Prerequisite(s): AC 301 and AC 302 and AC 331 and AC 441 and AC 442 and College Level=Senior.

AC 484. Acctg & Reprtg & Consolidation Adv Problems. 3 Hours.

This course covers current official pronouncements and current procedures accepted by the AICPA, the IRS, the FASB, the GASB and the Cost Accounting Standards Board. Comprehensive in depth and inter-area problems are explored and solved. Topics include: consolidations, cost accounting, accounting for governmental and nonprofit organizations, and individual and corporate taxes. Prerequisite(s): AC 301 and AC 302 and AC 331 and AC 441 and AC 442 and College Level=Senior.

AC 499. Accounting Seminar. 3 Hours.

The instructor and the student develop the subject matter of this course. The material covered consists of current issues and developments and must be relevant to the accounting field.

BA Courses

BA 101. Introduction to Business. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the general nature of functional areas in business such as marketing, management, accounting, finance, research and development, and risk management. The relationship between business, the government, the economy, and the environment is examined.

BA 111. Economic Geography. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the principles of economic geography, ranging from physical and biological geography to cultural and political factors. The decision making processes, both local and global, for different types of service oriented, manufacturing, transportation, and resource based businesses will be examined. The relationship of natural resources, population, and culture, and how such factors affect economic activity will be emphasized.

BA 201. Business Law I. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with a basic knowledge of the law of contracts, personal property and real property.

BA 202. Business Law II. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to augment BA 201 with in depth analysis of the law in Contracts, UCC, Corporations, Principal Agency Law, Advanced Tort Law, Environmental Law, Real Property Law, Securities Law and Employment Law.

BA 204. Franchise Formation and Management. 3 Hours.

This class will discuss franchise formation and management with particular emphasis on the discovery and evaluation of the franchisor and the feasibility of entrepreneurs converting an existing business into a franchise chain or creating and selling new franchises, domestic and international. Franchise accounting and finance (borrowing or leveraging) will be covered, as well as, taking the franchise to the stock market or going public (IPO) and raising investment capital. Prerequisite(s): BA 401.

BA 205. Real Estate Law. 3 Hours.

This course presents a systematic study of the basic principles of real property law through explanation, discussion and problem-solving techniques. The course provides a decision-oriented approach to legal concepts, featuring student completion of a complete abstract of title at the Penobscot County Registry of Deeds; real estate forms; and comprehension of relevant Maine statutes.

BA 210. Economics Overview for Non-Business Majors. 3 Hours.

This is an overview of microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts for non-business majors. It will include an introduction to American capitalism including the mechanics of supply and demand, elasticity, consumer demand, and price and output determination of competitive firms. It will also be an introduction to national income accounts, unemployment, inflation, government fiscal policy and monetary policy.

BA 211. Microeconomics. 3 Hours.

This is an introduction to American capitalism and microeconomic concepts including the mechanics of supply and demand, elasticity, consumer demand, and price and output determination of purely and impurely competitive firms.

BA 212. Macroeconomics. 3 Hours.

This is an introduction to macroeconomics in the American economy: national income accounts, unemployment, inflation, government fiscal policy, monetary policy and economic growth.

BA 220. Real Estate Principles and Practices. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with methods of analyzing acquisition and retention of Real Estate. Also, there will be a focus on the skills and techniques required to operate a real estate business, including trust accounts, risk management, and property management.

BA 243. The Business of Innovation. 3 Hours.

This is a cross-disciplinary class that will introduce students to the Lean Startup Scientific Method for developing and commercializing ideas for new ventures or else innovating and developing new products or business models within existing companies. Topics include marketplace innovations, technology and science based innovations, marketplace hypothesis development and testing, frugal and agile engineering, business models, intellectual property, prototyping, exit strategies, and fundraising. Lab component is integrated within module deliverables.

BA 271. Risk Management. 3 Hours.

A study is made of the risks encountered by individuals and business firms. A presentation is made of the basic principles and institutions, which have been developed in risk management. This material is treated primarily from the consumer point of view.

BA 299. Topic/. 1 Hour.

This is a course of variable content. Faculty and students prepare a special topic of timely interest in the business area. This course may consist of seminars, lectures, individualized instruction and/or research related to a specific area of specialization.

BA 300. Business Presentations. 3 Hours.

Communication is a vital function of any business. Managers at all levels must be able to communicate effectively to advance their career and ensure the success of their organization. This course will give students a working knowledge of how to create, brief, and present information across the organizational communications spectrum. Students will learn how to think critically and apply problem solving skills across a variety of historical and contemporary business topics. Students will learn how to collect, analyze, synthesize, and present information in a professional manner to assorted audiences in different venues. The foundational skill set developed in this course is the ability for students to articulate their ideas in a professional manner within a variety of business settings. Prerequisite(s): EH 124.

BA 302. Business Ethics. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to raise a moral consciousness and sensitivity within the various disciplines of the business curriculum. The disciplines focused on here are business, accounting, marketing, multinational corporations, and those areas of human resource management inclusive of diversity in the workplace within the context of environmental and social responsibility.

BA 306. Franchise Law. 3 Hours.

This is a law class that analyzes all the issues of Franchise Law with a particular emphasis on Contracts, Principal/Agent Franchise Relations, Corporate Formation of Franchises, and Securities Law. Prerequisite(s): BA 201 and BA 202.

BA 310. Organization and Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on how to design organization systems and effectively manage them. Students completing the course should understand the universal process of management and key terminology in the language of management. Students are encouraged conceptually to blend contributions from the various schools of management thought into an integrated perspective of what managers do and why.

BA 311. Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

This course addresses traditional personnel administration issues. Emphasis in the course is on how to manage the major human resource administration functions of job design, reward system design, staffing, training and performance control, to achieve maximum employee performance and satisfaction. Prerequisite(s): BA 310 or ( Major=BS Criminal Justice or Major=AS Criminal Justice or Major=AS Paralegal or Major=BS Paralegal or Major=BS English - Prelaw).

BA 312. Non-Profit Management and Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course examines the philosophical foundations of the non-profit sector and explores issues and problems specific to managing and leading non-profit organizations. Topics include leading and governing non-profit organizations, managing non-profit operations, board/staff relations, and developing and managing non-profit resources.

BA 321. Marketing Principles. 3 Hours.

The course covers the language and issues of marketing with an emphasis on developing responsive marketing strategies that meet customer needs. The course focuses on marketing concepts, the role of marketing in the organization, and the role of marketing in society. Topics include market segmentation, product development, promotion, distribution, and pricing. Other topics will be incorporated into the course including the external environment (focus on integrative topics within marketing, such as economics, politics, government, and nature), marketing research, international/global marketing with relevance to cultural diversity, ethics, the impact of technology on marketing, and careers in marketing.

BA 334. International Economics. 3 Hours.

This applied economics course will emphasize the use of cases to study topics such as comparative advantage, treaties, tariffs, non-tariff trade barriers, and trade blocks among developed and developing nations. Prerequisite(s): BA 211 and BA 212.

BA 344. Personal Financial Planning. 3 Hours.

This course provides comprehensive coverage of personal financial planning in the areas of money management, axes, consumer credit, housing and other consumer decisions, legal protection, insurance, retirement planning, and estate planning. Prerequisite(s): MS 141 or MS 111 or MS 242 or MS 180 or MS 181.

BA 351. Internship. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 352. Internship II. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 353. Internship III. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 354. Internship IV. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 355. Internship V. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong business element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director. Prerequisite(s): BA 351 and BA 352 and BA 353 and BA 354.

BA 362. Financial Management I. 3 Hours.

The foundation finance course covers basic personal and corporate financial management issues. Topics include personal financial planning, financial statements, financial ratio analysis, capital budgeting, financial forecasting, and cash inventory and receivables management. Students are expected to become proficient in financial analysis of a corporation and in various aspects of corporate financial management. Prerequisite(s): AC 121 and (AC 122 or AC 211) and BA 211 and (MS 141 or MS 111 or MS 242 or MS 180 or MS 181).

BA 364. Financial Management II. 3 Hours.

The course is a continuation of Financial Management I and will cover such topics as real options, sensitivity, scenario and break-even analysis, basic issues regarding stocks and bonds, risk/return and cost of capital, capital structure and limits to the use of debt. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 375. Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides the basic concepts of logistics and supply chain management. The student will study logistical problems and appropriate strategie to solve these problems in the major areas of transportation, inventory, location, logistics control and global logistics planning. This course will represent the basic marketing areas: distribution, product, price and promotion.

BA 401. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to close the gap between economic theory and business application. It reviews traditional analysis and shows its application to the understanding and solution of economic problems of the firm and industry. Prerequisite(s): BA 211 and BA 212.

BA 411. Organizational Behavior. 3 Hours.

This course is highly experiential in its approach to helping students understand and appreciate why people behave the way they do in an organizational context. Students learn how to manage employee behavior by analysis of real world phenomena and by application of principles in the areas of human perception and communication, leadership and motivation, small group dynamics, organizational culture, and organizational change. Prerequisite(s): BA 310.

BA 413. Operations Management. 3 Hours.

Quantitative model building and manipulation are a means of analyzing and synthesizing the elements of productions management. Both deterministic and stochastic modeling are emphasized in the areas of work systems design, queuing, PERT, SQC, inventory control, forecasting, and linear and nonlinear programming. Prerequisite(s): BA 310 and MS 132.

BA 414. Business Strategy. 3 Hours.

This Business Administration senior seminar focuses on decision making at the executive management level, the formulation of strategy, and its implementation in the organization. The course will employ case studies, laboratory simulation techniques, and computer spreadsheet analysis. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior.

BA 421. Integrated Marketing Communication and Advertising. 3 Hours.

An introduction into the world of advertising: Students will plan and design Ad campaigns, write copy and design layouts for the different types/forms of advertising. The students will work with local companies and assist them in redesign of their ad campaigns. Prerequisite(s): BA 321.

BA 422. Sales and Sales Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with the fundamentals of good salesmanship and sales management. Prior to studying management principles students practice sales techniques in simulations. Cases are used to illustrate and evaluate principles of sales management. Prerequisite(s): BA 321.

BA 423. Retail Management. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamentals of successful retail operations. Topics included are the market concept in retailing, factors of area and market analysis, and aspects of organizational structure, layout, and personnel planning. Also covered are methods of pricing, merchandising planning, inventory, expense control and sales promotion techniques. Prerequisite(s): BA 321.

BA 424. Marketing Research. 3 Hours.

The basic research concepts and practices as applied to the analysis of marketing problems are examined. Topics include sources of data, collecting data, sampling, questionnaire construction, tabulating data, and report preparation; computerized statistical software is used. Prerequisite(s): BA 321 and MS 132.

BA 425. Marketing Management. 3 Hours.

This is the capstone course for marketing majors. Students apply concepts learned in other courses to marketing problems of business and nonprofit organizations. Cases and business simulations are used to teach decision-making in the complex environment of business. A complete marketing plan for a simulated company of the student’s choice summarizes the student’s knowledge of the field. Prerequisite(s): BA 321.

BA 426. Real Estate Market, Research and Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course will discuss market research, real estate sales, property valuations and analysis. Students will examine market research reports to gain insight into product and market trends, opportunities, projections, and growth in the Maine, the US and global real estate markets. Prerequisite(s): BA 401 and MS 132 and (BA 205 or PL 201).

BA 427. Franchise Market Research and Analysis. 3 Hours.

This class will focus on analysis of market demographics, feasibility studies, product pricing, promotion and distribution, franchise broker contacts, extrapolation of sales and expenses, and the projection of costs and net profits, emerging markets and capital expansion. Prerequisite(s): BA 401 and MS 132 and MS 232 and BA 362.

BA 428. Strategic Selling. 3 Hours.

This course builds on the fundamentals of selling. The student will understand how to advance sales in light of complex business environments consisting of layers of buyers, decision makers and those who influence purchasing decisions. A strategic account planning process will be analyzed and applied to real companies by way of case studies. The art and skill of negotiating will be studied and learned through role play. Prerequisite(s): BA 422.

BA 434. International Finance. 3 Hours.

The factors affecting exchange rates are discussed, as well as different types of exchange rate systems and how governments attempt to influence exchange rates. The relationships among interest rate parity, purchasing power parity, the Fisher effect and International Fisher effect and exchange rates are analyzed. Students learn how currency futures, currency options and money market hedges are used to hedge exchange rate risk. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 437. International Marketing. 3 Hours.

The basics of international marketing will be taught including the foundations of culture, cultural understanding, business customs and practices in global marketing, assessing global markets, and developing international marketing strategy. Prerequisite(s): BA 321.

BA 438. Export-Import Procedures. 3 Hours.

The basics of export-import procedures will be taught including justification for exporting/importing, market planning methods, selection of appropriate marketing mix variables, and regulation. Prerequisite(s): BA 321.

BA 439. International Franchising Management. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on international expansion of franchises, learning the culture, monetary exchanges, imports and exports, local international market analysis and much more. Prerequisite(s): BA 204 and BA 306 and BA 427.

BA 440. Small Business Management I. 3 Hours.

This course supplies prospective and current small business managers with the essential concepts of starting and operating small businesses. Topics covered include: environment and management of small business enterprise, problems in starting small businesses, financial and administrative control, and management of business operations. Particular emphasis is placed on the interrelated nature of the components, particularly as they affect the financial picture of the firm. Through a lecture and discussion format, students are expected to share their own experiences in small businesses with their fellow students. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior or College Level=Junior.

BA 441. Entrepreneurship I- New Venture Development. 3 Hours.

Students will be introduced to the practical application of classic and contemporary business theory as it applies to the early stages of entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship, opportunity recognition, innovation, and new venture development. Course topics include types of entrepreneurs, opportunity recognition, marketing, cash and other resource requirements, financial statements, planning, franchising, intellectual property, success/failure/resilience, and growth. Class will use text, cases, articles, internet sources, and guest lecturers. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior or College Level=Junior.

BA 442. Applied Small Business Management. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced course which focuses on real problems in Small Business Management, using the case approach. Cases are drawn from the text, from actual local small businesses, and from the practical experience of students in the class. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Junior or College Level=Senior.

BA 443. Entrepreneurship II: Business Plans. 3 Hours.

This class builds on BA 441, New Venture Development. The focus of this class is on the early stages of formalizing and growing a venture. Topics include business plan writing, fund raising and cash flow, measuring and conveying financial position, core strategy development and competitive advantage, sustainability, international entrepreneurship, supply chain, growth, and exit. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Junior or College Level=Senior.

BA 460. Investments. 3 Hours.

Beginning with an introduction to financial markets and investment instruments, topics include stock and bond quotations and trading procedures, rate of return, margin trading, stock indexes, stock and bond valuation, risk and return, portfolio theory, active and passive portfolio management, and investment performance evaluation. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 464. Bank & Financial Services Management. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce students to the specific issues in the financial management of a banking firm and, to a smaller degree, of other financial intermediaries. Emphasis will be on products, roles, regulatory framework, and risk management. Prerequisite(s): BA 362.

BA 465. Biotechnology: The Business of Genetics. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to become familiar with the scope and nature of organizations that work with genetics within biotechnology industries. Through extensive case studies, students focus on the dynamics of these enterprises, their organizational structures, the regulatory considerations of these entities, and how organizational cultures are created to enhance opportunities for innovation and discovery.

BA 471. Life and Health Insurance. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to provide background knowledge for personal application and for those responsible for administering benefit plans for employees; it provides the necessary information required to pass the State of Maine license examination. Prerequisite(s): BA 271.

BA 472. Casualty and Property Insurance. 3 Hours.

The first part of the course introduces the basics of the entire insurance business, including a summary of legal aspects, types of insurers and principles of reinsurance; next, each type of insurance is studied in detail. Topics covered are fire, consequential loss, inland marine, ocean marine, theft and surety, liability and miscellaneous property insurance. Prerequisite(s): BA 271.

BA 473. Real Estate Appraisal. 3 Hours.

This course familiarizes the student with the foundation and principles of the appraisal process. The student will become familiar with the three approaches to value. Site valuation, construction costs, depreciation; comparables selection and adjustments; rental multipliers; and reconciliation will be discussed. The student will focus on the elements making up the standards for professional appraisal practice. These elements, i.e., Definitions, Rules, Standards and Standard Rules, Statements and advisory opinions are discussed in detail along with the philosophy and history of USPAP. Prerequisite(s): BA 401 and MS 132 and BA 362.

BA 475. E-Business and E-Commerce for Managers. 3 Hours.

This course teaches the basic e-business and e-commerce theory. The students will apply the theory through the development of a website for the prime purpose of marketing a product or service or idea online.

BA 490. International Business. 3 Hours.

This course covers the international dimensions of managerial decision-making including: world economies, international trade theories, tariffs, quotas and other trade issues, global strategic planning, cross-cultural management, international market entry, international human resource management, international organization strategy, international logistics, import/export operations, currency exchange, international financial management. Current developments in global economic and business are emphasized; students participate in a computerized simulation throughout the semester. Prerequisite(s): BA 310 and BA 321.

BA 495. Senior Management Project. 3 Hours.

An experiential course that gives seniors the opportunity to apply what they have learned in class to a real business situation. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior.

BA 496. Leadership Maine. 3 Hours.

This course awards academic credit for participation in the Bangor Region Leadership Institute (BRLI) program or the Leadership Maine program. Both programs are designed to lead students in an exploration of leadership and their leadership capabilities. Throughout the programs, students are introduced to key social and economic issues impacting the local region and the state of Maine. The programs culminate in an experiential project undertaken with a non-profit partner.

BA 497. Business and Culture Travel Study Course. 3 Hours.

Business and Culture Travel Study course is designed to expose students to economies across the world. During the course students will travel to important commercial, cultural and governmental cities. Through a combination of readings students will be exposed to 20th and 21st century history, economics, culture political and business philosophy. The course will also involve visits to major multinational corporations, cultural activities and lectures from University business faculty when available. The course will also have two pre-trip class sessions with readings and one post course session to wrap up the experience and discuss the student travel logs.

BA 498. Business Seminar. 3 Hours.

This honors course requires the study of various business problems under the supervision of members of the Department of Business Administration. A paper is required. An oral examination is scheduled as the final examination in the course. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior.

BA 499. Topic/. 1-3 Hour.

This is a course of variable content. Faculty and students prepare a special topic of timely interest in the business area. This course may consist of seminars, lectures, individualized instruction and/or research related to a specific area of specialization.

BA 600. Research Methods in Business and Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for beginning graduate students who have little or no formal preparation in those areas of research and problem-solving essential for a comprehensive study of business and education at the graduate level. Emphasis is placed on the identification of common problem types and the selection and use of appropriate methods of analysis (primarily statistical in nature).

BA 601. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

This course begins with a comprehensive overview of micro- and macroeconomic concepts with the aim of developing within students a picture of how business and nonprofit organizations relate to the economy as a whole. The course then focuses on practical applications of economic analysis to problems of concern to managers. Case studies and projects are used to demonstrate the methods used to determine economic feasibility and cost-effectiveness of products, services, and programs.

BA 602. Managerial Accounting. 3 Hours.

This is an accelerated accounting course for those with little or no formal accounting background. The emphasis is on concepts which managers need to know in order to be effective. Topics include the preparation and interpretation of financial statements, cost planning and control, cost-volume-profit analysis, decision-making models, master budgeting and variances, and evaluation of capital projects.

BA 605. Management Communications. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced communications course that builds upon a student’s experience and prior undergraduate coursework in writing and oral communications. Topics include: advanced business writing, use of visual materials, selection of secondary sources of information, report preparation, and presentations to small and large groups.

BA 611. Organizational Behavior. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the major field of management, examining structures and processes on both group and organizational levels. Both traditional and contemporary theories are analyzed and applied to business operations.

BA 620. Financial Management. 3 Hours.

Topics considered include financial planning, operating and capital budgets, cash flow, purchasing and accounting procedures, the sources and uses of corporate and institutional funds, and financial analysis for evaluation and control. Students develop projects specifically related to their needs in educational administration, small business, or corporate management. Prerequisite(s): BA 602 or AC 301.

BA 621. Marketing Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on complex problems facing decision-makers in the marketing of goods and services. Emphasis is placed on the decision-making process, including assessment of the social, economic, and political environment in which the organization operates; problem definition; development and evaluation of alternatives, and the implementation of the best alternative. Cases in advertising, sales, marketing research, and strategic marketing management provide practice in marketing analysis and decision-making.

BA 622. Production Management. 3 Hours.

Emphasis is placed on the use of quantitative techniques for solving manufacturing problems. The student is given an opportunity to practice mathematical model-building and manipulation. Other topics considered include queuing system design, plant layout, statistical quality control, inventory modeling, Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT), linear and nonlinear programming, and control theory.

BA 625. Global Strategic Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the strategic challenges and opportunities confronting firms that undertake to create value and to compete in the global economy. Successful companies develop strategies for doing business in emerging markets that are different from those they use at home and often find novel ways of implementing them too. The class will make extensive use of case analysis and discussion to evaluate and understand the strategic issues that confront firms operating internationally, as well as to appreciate the importance of values and ethics in organization decisions and actions. In this course we will probe the workings of business strategies in transition and emerging economies, gain an understanding of the strategies of local firms, and analyze the international success and failure of companies. Prerequisite(s): BA 600 and 15 Credits From Range [BA 600 To BA 799].

BA 626. Accounting in Planning, Budgeting and Control. 3 Hours.

This course examines the role of accounting in the planning, budgeting, and control process of a business in a dynamic environment. The integration of measuring and analyzing (planning), short-term decisions and managing organizations (control), and preparing various budgets (budgeting) are emphasized. This course is designed as a continuation of BA602 Managerial Accounting. Numerical problems, as well as case studies, are utilized as methods of study. Prerequisite(s): BA 602 or AC 211.

BA 627. Investment Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course provides a detailed description of securities market organization and approaches to investment opportunities. Students will examine theories used in the valuation of financial securities and employ projects and applications to develop a real world understanding of portfolio management. Prerequisite(s): BA 602.

BA 628. New Venture Planning and Management. 3 Hours.

This course deals with the foundation of new ventures and related aspects of managing the small growing enterprise. Techniques taught in this course are equally applicable to small businesses, nonprofit organizations, and new ventures of larger organizations. Topics include: use of scarce resources, such as money, talent and technological expertise; identification of environmental threats and opportunities; and operational considerations such as organizational structure, legal requirements, financing, and accounting procedures.

BA 641. Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

This course explores human resource management as an integrated process of planning and control designed to achieve high employee productivity and job satisfaction. The course focuses on the essential functions of human resource management as they apply both to the general supervisory responsibilities of every manager and to the specific operations of the personnel department.

BA 642. Leadership in Business and Professions. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide graduate management students with a comprehensive review of the essentials for effective leadership. It focuses on the identification of basic leadership styles, explores the theoretical and practical findings of research in leadership development, and seeks to synthesize the student’s leadership style with the most effective working models of leadership.

BA 643. Strategic Change Management. 3 Hours.

Strategic Change Management focuses on the skills required to deal effectively with organizational change. The course addresses first the pressures in the business environment that make change a fundamental reality for managers. Particular attention is paid to change arising from public policy initiatives that impinge on business. The course then examines the manager as change agent responsible for initiating innovation and explores both the personal skills required in the role of change agent and the tools and techniques available to support the manager in that role. The course also examines the problems and opportunities of those who are the recipients of change in an organization and the skills required to cope effectively with that situation.

BA 644. The Legal Environment of Business. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an overview of the important aspects of business law for executives, managers, accountants, and other professionals. The areas of law covered include but are not limited to administrative, contract, corporate and other business organizations, employment relations, real estate, taxes, and UCC sales.

BA 646. Current Issues in Business. 3 Hours.

This course, conducted in seminar fashion, draws on current literature to analyze contemporary and emerging issues facing management in the late twentieth century. Content will vary.

BA 700. Health Care Management. 3 Hours.

This course examines management problems and policy-making in the health care industry. Several areas are considered including: (1) the functions of the health care manager, (2) the types of health care delivery systems, (3) the administration of hospitals, (4) the financing of medical care, and (5) the role of government. Through readings, lectures, discussions, and projects, students clarify their own role in the delivery of health services. The course regularly draws on experts in health planning and health care administration.

BA 701. Legal Environment of Health Care Management. 3 Hours.

The course provides a foundation in the legal and regulatory framework in which health care institutions operate. Students will also examine the legal issues confronting health care managers including director and administrative liability, malpractice, negligence, patient rights and confidentiality, licensure requirements, and the like.

BA 702. Health Care Economics. 3 Hours.

In this course, the principles and tools of economic decision-making are applied to management in the health care sector. The course explores the application to health care management functions of such concepts and processes as supply and demand, resource allocation and utilization, costing and pricing, resource productivity, forecasting and economic aspects of planning, and utilization review. While the principal emphasis in the course is on micro-economic analysis, some consideration is also given to an economic analysis of public policy alternatives for the delivery of health care service. Prerequisite(s): BA 601.

BA 703. Financial Management in Healthcare Organizations. 3 Hours.

This course applies the perspectives and tools of financial analysis to the management of health care organizations and evaluation of organizational performance. Topics covered include capital budgeting, sources of operating revenue, management of cash and inventories, risk analysis and forecasting. Particular attention is paid to cost containment regulatory strategies and their implications for financial planning and management. Prerequisite(s): BA 602.

BA 704. Managing Quality in Healthcare. 3 Hours.

This course examines methods and tools for managing quality in health facilities, physician practices, managed care, and public health. Topics include developments in quality assurance and improvement, utilization review, risk management, and patient satisfaction.

BA 705. Global Perspectives in Healthcare. 3 Hours.

This course examines the social, political, and economic aspects of global healthcare issues. Through a comparative analysis of the health systems of multiple nations, students will compare theories of health policy and priorities, healthcare system facilities, workforce, technology, cost, quality, and access. The emphasis of the course will be on health management strategies used in different countries and healthcare systems to mobilize, allocate, and maintain resources to improve the healthcare status and delivery systems.

BA 710. Law & Ethics for Non-Profit Organizations. 3 Hours.

Non-profit managers and supervisors are held to a higher standard of ethical behavior due to the nature of their funding sources and their mission. This course is designed to develop in the student a basic understanding of the laws governing non-profit organizations, the practical applications of these laws and the ethics that are demanded of non-profit managers.

BA 711. Non-Profit Management and Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course examines the philosophical foundations of the non-profit sector and explores issues and problems specific to managing and leading non-profit organizations. Topics covered include: leading and governing non-profit organizations, managing non-profit operations, board/staff relations, and developing and managing non-profit resources.

BA 712. Strategic Marketing for Nonprofit Organizations. 3 Hours.

This course applies the concepts of marketing and strategy to the management of non-profit organizations. Through class lectures, discussion, case studies, and applied projects, students will build an understanding of the marketing process in the non-profit environment in order to be able to design, implement, and evaluate an organization’s approach to marketing and strategic positioning.

BA 713. Fundraising. 3 Hours.

This course takes a systems approach to the process of fund-raising. Topics covered include: donor cultivation, use of the annual fund, major gifts, corporate giving, and grant writing.

BA 720. Advanced Sales and Marketing in Hospitality. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on difficult problems and issues facing sales and marketing personnel in the hospitality industry. Students will make use of case studies in order to develop their decision-making process including the use of marketing research and analysis.

BA 721. Convention Planning and Events Planning. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the rapidly growing convention sales and events planning industries. The student will learn how to design, plan, market and manage meetings and events.

BA 722. Advanced Front Office Operations. 3 Hours.

This course begins with detailed introduction about numerous aspects of front office operations and management. The next section of the course examines the complex relationships between lodging departments, technological advances, and personnel decisions. The final section of the course includes the many guest service concepts that distinguish a great hotel experience from an average one.

BA 723. Legal Issues in Hospitality Management. 3 Hours.

This course will provide the student an overview of the important aspects of Hospitality Law for Managers, and other professionals. Some of the areas of study include and are not limited to Torts, Products Liability, Constitutional Law and Criminal Law and many other subjects.

BA 724. Managing Service. 3 Hours.

This course begins with an introduction to the framework for providing quality service to customers and guests. Next we will discuss the needs of the customer/guest and proceed to develop our menu and/or product accordingly. Finally, we will learn how management and staff create loyal customers and guests by delivering service that exceeds their expectations.

BA 729. Hospitality Graduate Directed Practicum. 3 Hours.

Each student will find, will choose or will be provided with an internship site. The site chosen will be based on; and interview conducted by the management of the internship site and the student's preference of location based on those available. The Coordinator of Hospitality Management will have the final decision on all internship site placements. The Coordinator's decision will be based on his or her interaction with the student during previous course work, his or her understanding of the student and the internship properties requirements. Every consideration will be given to the student's personal preferences with regard to location and types of property. However, the student's preferences will not be the only consideration for placement. Prerequisite(s): BA 720 and BA 722 and BA 724.

BA 731. Business and Information Technology. 3 Hours.

This graduate course approaches Information Technology from the perspective of information consumers as opposed to technology implementers. During this course, students will examine various technologies and their application within modern organizations. The course has two primary goals. (1) The course will explain information technologies in non-technical terms so that students can evaluate a technology’s effectiveness relative to any existing alternatives and the overall organizational needs. (2) This course should increase student awareness regarding how they interact with technology in a personal or business setting. Business leaders are constantly bombarded with technology. This course addresses the need to sift through that information in an intelligent manner and make smart business decisions.

BA 741. Staffing & Selection. 3 Hours.

A source of competitive advantage for any organization is its talent. The effectiveness of an organization depends on the performance of each individual in that organization. Hence, one of the most important human resource functions is that of staffing the organization. This course is essential for HR professionals who are responsible for recruiting, screening, hiring, promoting, and outplacing employees. It is also very crucial for any line managers, supervisors, team leaders, and hiring managers who are involved in recruiting, making promotions, succession, or any other workforce decisions. An examination of the scientific, legal, and administrative issues associated with the recruitment, selection, employment and retention of individuals by organizations augments the study. Specific attention will be given to the current challenges of an increasingly dynamic workplace and diverse workforce.

BA 742. Training & Development. 3 Hours.

The effective training and development of human resources creates tremendous and unique value for an organization. This course examines how organizations can develop and manage the talents and skillset of human capital. The course explores topics such as training needs analysis, formulating training objectives, and the design, implementation, and evaluation of training and development programs.

BA 745. Innovative Global Strategy. 3 Hours.

This course will build students’ awareness of the challenges that must be addressed and the opportunities that may be present when competing in the global marketplace. The course focuses on how firms apply innovative strategies to create a sustainable competitive advantage in the global arena. Course content will be drawn from readings, case analysis, online content and discussions. The course requires students to analyze and understand real world examples of both successful and unsuccessful global strategy implementation.

BA 750. Fundamentals of Risk Management. 3 Hours.

This course explores the fundamentals of risk management. After discussion of the importance of risk and the rationale for its management in organizations, the remainder of the course will analyze the process of and methods for managing risk.

BA 751. Employee Benefits. 3 Hours.

This course explores the nature and operation of employer-sponsored benefit plans. Emphasis is placed on plan design, administration, funding, and regulation. The course also addresses organizational characteristics, benefit structure, and pricing of risk transfer schemes for groups.

BA 752. Crisis Management. 3 Hours.

Crisis Management can be defined as a communications response to an event that has a negative impact on an audience - the public, customers/clients, employees, shareholders, etc. Examples of such events could include tainted food, a corporate leak, a political scandal, an entertainment or athletic scandal, damaged products that cause or could potentially cause life-threatening situations, natural disasters, terrorism, and financial disasters. In this course, students will analyze and critique high-profile cases and learn how to effectively respond to crises.

BA 753. Corporate Risk Management. 3 Hours.

Corporate risk is analyzed through the lens of enterprise risk management. This course explores the operational and financial risks faced by firms and the study of various methods of handling these risks.

BA 754. Strategic Selling. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is on key, strategic customer selling approaches. The process of sales planning and strategy development for these types of customers will be emphasized. The objective of this course is to understand and execute sales strategies for managing major and large customers.

BA 760. Technology & Innovation. 3 Hours.

BA 760 Technology & Innovation offers a research approach to identifying, analyzing, and creating technological advantage in nascent and mature industries. Students will apply the methodologies of innovation and discovery to business settings and markets, seeking to create competitive advantage and achieve market transformation through strategic initiatives that redefine consumer expectations and industry practices and reframe organizations to embrace innovative practices and processes.

BA 761. Biotechnology: The Business of Genetics. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to become familiar with the scope and nature of organizations that work with genetics within biotechnology industries. Through extensive case studies, students focus on the dynamics of these enterprises, their organizational structures, the regulatory considerations of these entities, and how organizational cultures are created to enhance opportunities for innovation and discovery.

BA 762. Groupthink. 3 Hours.

This course explores the origin of groupthink. Groupthink is a term first used by social psychologist Irving L. Janis (1972) that refers to a psychological phenomenon in which people strive for consensus within a group. This course explores groupthink as a phenomenon where people set aside their own personal beliefs or adopt the opinion of the rest of the group.

BA 763. Biotechnology & Innovation: Intellectual Property. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the protection of proprietary and intellectual rights in inventions, writings, creative works, software, industry trade secrets, industry trade designations, and other intellectual assets at the international, Federal, and State Levels. The course will give special consideration to the emergence of new areas of patent law in Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical fields, examining not only the patentability of intellectual assets, but also the discovery process, particularly in collaborative environments involving multiple organizations and institutions, and the qualifying distinctions between collaborative and competitive research.

BA 790. Independent Study. 3 Hours.

The student studies with a faculty member who specializes in an appropriate field. Emphasis is on individual reading and directed action or research programs which involve student and professor. The student must have the approval of the dean, the faculty member involved, and must file a written plan of the project with the graduate dean. A maximum of three (3) credits may be earned.*.

BA 791. Professional Project. 3-6 Hours.

This course is used to award graduate credit for prior learning and educational experience obtained outside of the traditional classroom. Through the preparation of a professional project, students provide formal documentation of the specific graduate-level learning competencies which they have acquired through prior experience. A maximum of six (6) credit hours may be earned.

BA 792. Graduate Internship I. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director.

BA 793. Graduate Internship II. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization's supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director. Prerequisite(s): BA 792.

BA 794. Graduate Internship III. 3 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern in a business or non-profit organization. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional organization supervisor, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong accounting element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director. Prerequisite(s): BA 793.

BA 796. Leadership Maine. 3 Hours.

This course awards academic credit for participation in the Bangor Region Leadership Institute (BRLI) program or the Leadership Maine program. Both programs are designed to lead students in an exploration of leadership and their leadership capabilities. Throughout the programs, students are introduced to key social and economic issues impacting the local region and the state of Maine. The programs culminate in an experiential project undertaken with a non-profit partner.

BA 798. Thesis. 6 Hours.

The thesis may be library-oriented research with extensive reliance on documents and a relatively limited amount of primary field research, or it may be action-oriented field research with relevant documentation from the literature. The title of the thesis topic must be filed with the graduate committee. A student, with the approval of his/her advisory committee, may register for the thesis after completion of twenty-four (24) semester hours.

BA 799. Topic/. 3 Hours.

Students work together in a seminar setting under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. The content of the seminar will vary according to the interests of students and faculty involved.

CJ Courses

CJ 101. Intro to Justice & Pub Safety. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the social reality of crime, criminal behavior, and law as each of these relates to the criminal justice system.  Students examine the role of law enforcement, prosecution, defense, court system, corrections, and juvenile justice at various levels.  Students are challenged to expand both their knowledge and appreciation of the criminal justice system through arranged visits to courts, detention facilities and working law enforcement agencies.

CJ 190. The Science of Fingerprints. 3 Hours.

This course will allow students to examine every facet of the discipline, from the history of friction ridge identification and its earliest pioneers and researchers, skin growth in the embryo, structure of skin, scarring and histology, the chemistry of sweat and other secretions, to the scientific basis and the various steps of the identification process.

CJ 215. Police Operations. 3 Hours.

This course deals with everyday problems, situations and operations of the police department and the police officer. Included in the course is the study of many jobs and applications of duty in the police service. The course is a study of the patrol officer’s function, with a background investigation of the total organization. The use of staff deployment, tactical operations, and the use of various equipment are discussed in some detail during the course with an emphasis on how operations and equipment are changing. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101.

CJ 221. Criminalistics. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the recovery, documentation and laboratory analysis of physical evidence found at the scene of a crime. The course covers the principles of effective crime scene management as well as what information can be obtained from particular pieces of physical evidence as a result of laboratory study. The laboratory analysis of the following will be covered: glass, soil, organic and inorganic substances, hairs, fibers, paint, drugs, poison, arson and explosive evidence, serology, DNA, fingerprints, firearms, tool impressions, miscellaneous impressions, photography, document and voice examinations. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101.

CJ 225. Criminal Procedure. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to teach the background and current information regarding arrest, search and seizure. It explores the development of standards in this field, through constitutional law, state law, concepts and interpretation, limitations of police powers, probable cause, and the suppression hearing.

CJ 235. Criminology. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce and review the sociological perspective as it is applied to the themes of crime, criminality and the individual offender. Specifically, criminological theories of social process, social structure and social conflict will be explored in conjunction with views on developmental and trait-based perspectives to illuminate the social underpinnings of crime in modern society. Each particular viewpoint will be applied to the understanding of broad categories of criminal behavior and activity, including but not limited to: violent crime, property crime, public order crimes, organized crime, and white collar offenses. Additionally, the criminal justice system and its component structural and procedural parts will be reviewed to provide the student with an enhanced awareness of the social aspects of criminal behavior and its impact for law-making and enforcement. Prerequisite(s): PY 111 and (SY 201 or SY 222).

CJ 290. Psychology and the Legal System. 3 Hours.

Students will explore the movement of criminal defendants through the legal system in light of various clinical necessities, including but not limited to: Competencies to offer testimony, as well as to be sentenced and excused; jury selection; and the identification and evaluation of criminal suspects. Additionally, emphasis will be placed upon the psychology of victimization. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 and CJ 225 and PY 111.

CJ 301. Critical Skills. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce and review the basic law enforcement skills of self defense and control. Specifically, students will learn and practice the important elements of establishing control of situations using verbal, nonverbal and physical techniques as complementary intervention options. Strategies to manage the initial encounter will be discussed in regard to proper stance, appropriate social distance, authoritative body language and the use of verbal diffusion. The physical element of encounters will be reviewed and practiced to provide the student with a practical knowledge of techniques including, but not limited to: deflection, strikes and counters, takedowns and ground control of a combative individual. The above skills will be expanded upon to provide the necessary understanding of other control systems such as proper use of handcuffs, baton and chemical products to establish control. The focus on practical skills will be reviewed within the context of the use of force continuum ranging from verbal redirection to deadly force. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 and CJ 215.

CJ 302. Advanced Critical Skills. 3 Hours.

This course is intended as a continuation of the psychological and physical applications of critical skills (police physical restraint and control). Through a series of steps, the student will reinforce the basics, enhance the flow of technique and finally though situational training strengthen and secure psychological and physical technique to specific calls and events. The focus on practical skills will be reviewed within the context of the use of force continuum ranging from verbal redirection to deadly force. Prerequisite(s): CJ 301.

CJ 305. Motor Vehicle Law. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce and review motor vehicle law as relates to the enforcement of those statutes concerned with moving violations. The student will also be introduced to the principles and procedures of identification and investigation of motor vehicle infractions. Specifically, topics will be presented ranging from vehicle stops and pursuit driving to operating under the influence and traffic-related fatalities, including homicide. Students will gain in in-depth understanding of accident and hit-and-run investigation, as well as an overview of providing testimony in the courtroom. Each aspect of enforcement and investigation will thereby contribute to an appreciation of the complexities of police responsibilities regarding the monitoring and control of traffic movement. Prerequisite(s): PL 200.

CJ 307. Community Policing. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce and review the basic principles of community policing strategies in contemporary society. The importance of enhanced law enforcement-community relationships will be discussed in relation to the benefits to the citizenry as well as enhanced relations with community stakeholders such as schools, businesses and religious institutions. Specifically, the student will be expected to gain an appreciation of the police officer as a community member who works collaboratively with private citizens to analyze, evaluate and respond to crime. This focus on cooperative problem-solving will be further explored in regard to how strategic partnerships between law enforcement and the community can positively impact criminal acts, fear of crime and social disorder. Prerequisite(s): CJ 215.

CJ 309. Constitutional Law. 3 Hours.

This course will explore the First, Second, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments of the Constitution through reading of case law and real life examples. Students will understand the arguments that exist for persons involved in civil and criminal matters from the Constitution. Prerequisite(s): CJ 225.

CJ 310. Mod Penology and Corrections. 3 Hours.

This course offers an in-depth familiarity with the key readings in the history and sociology of incarceration. Topics include: theories of incarceration, sentence determination, with emphasis on the controversy over the federal guidelines, history of our incarceration system, inmate and staff perspectives on incarceration, special category inmates such as mentally ill, rape victims, death row inmates, and juvenile offenders, the death penalty, and the community supervision movement. The course concludes with an examination of the new technologies of incarceration. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101.

CJ 315. Juvenile Justice. 3 Hours.

This course covers the institutional response to the problems of juvenile delinquency, juvenile misconduct and dependent/neglected and abused children. It emphasizes the police, court, and correctional agencies that process young people. In addition, it devotes attention to an understanding of the history of the system, recent legal developments, and an assessment of current proposals for reform. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101.

CJ 330. Ethics in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

This course will offer the student an examination of ethical systems as they relate to moral beliefs and professional behavior in law enforcement. Students will discuss how ideology and belief systems, whether liberal, moderate, or conservative affects criminal justice policy making and the day-to-day functioning of criminal justice agencies. As an exercise, students will apply ethical decision-making models to real world scenarios. Additionally, the course will include thirteen objectives that the student will be expected to master extending from a code of ethics for police to major rationales for punishment. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101.

CJ 333. Computer Forensics. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the investigative use of computer technologies and electronic records. Students will be exposed to “digital evidence” and the valuable information it can provide to investigators. The course will have a two-tier approach. (1) Students will be shown how to extract readily decipherable information from someone’s computer such as looking for at their files or their browser history of web sites visited. Even if the information is password protected or has been deleted it might still be recoverable. (2) The course will examine criminals who use computers and the Internet to commit various crimes ranging from trying to lure children into chat rooms or face-to-face meetings to every sort of financial fraud. This course is intended to address a growing need in law enforcement. Prerequisite(s): Major=BS Comp Info Systems or Major=BS Criminal Justice.

CJ 335. Report Writing and Testifying. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to teach students how to write police reports, search warrants and affidavits. Topics studied will include: the SEE method; legal concepts of reasonable articulable suspicion; probable cause to arrest; determination of custody for purposes of Miranda; and testifying effectively in court. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 and CJ 225 and PL 200.

CJ 337. Interviewing and Interrogation. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on interviewing skills and techniques, both from a practical and legal perspective. Primary attention will be given to what needs to be done to satisfy the legal standards of voluntariness of admissions and confessions. Fifth and Sixth Amendment law will be thoroughly reviewed and discussed. The course will prepare students to conduct effective interrogations, and document the interrogation in a manner that will withstand later legal challenges. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 and CJ 225 and PL 200.

CJ 341. Investigations. 3 Hours.

This course covers both private and public investigations as well as the practice and application to criminal investigations. It stresses the professionalism and modern investigation tools as it covers established investigation policies, procedures, and techniques for the law enforcement officer. Recent court cases and investigations are integrated throughout the course to update the students on significant happenings throughout the world. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101.

CJ 345. Comparative Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce and review the basic theoretical, cultural and practical applications of criminal justice systems in other parts of the world. American criminal law and procedure will be discussed to provide a comparative reference point for the variations in systems and practices across differing cultures in other nations. Additionally, the course will provide students with an understanding of the roles of social control mechanisms such as police, judiciary and correctional institutions outside of the U.S. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 and CJ 225.

CJ 399. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer advanced courses in criminal justice that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend of the interests of students and faculty.

CJ 400. Evidence. 3 Hours.

This course will present the basic principles of the law of evidence as expressed in the Federal Rules of Evidence and the Maine Rules of Evidence. The student will develop the ability to read and apply a rule of evidence to specific information and circumstances. An emphasis will be placed on learning how the Federal & Maine Rules of Evidence effect trial preparation, negotiation, and trial. Participatory role play and discussion of hypothetical situations will constitute a significant part of the learning experience. Prerequisite(s): Major=AS Criminal Justice or Major=AS Paralegal or Major=BS Criminal Justice or Major=BS Paralegal or Major=BS English - Prelaw.

CJ 401. Civil Liability in Law Enforcement. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with a historical overview and current trends in civil litigation against law enforcement as well as describing the varying types of liability that exist under the law. Students will study the defenses to liability claims made against law enforcement. Liability claims will also be examined from the administrator’s point of view including claims of failure to train and failure to supervise. Use of force and section 1983 claims will be examined in detail as the main claims against law enforcement. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101.

CJ 402. Perspectives in Terrorism. 3 Hours.

This course will analyze aspects of historical and current extremism and terrorism which will be related to contemporary domestic and international terrorism issues. The course will cover sophisticated theories developed by analysts around the world to investigate paramilitarism, white supremacy groups, hate groups, religious fundamentalism, and foreign terrorist groups which may pose a threat to United States interests. The special topic analyzed is not a regular course offering of the social sciences department. Since the topic covered in this class differs from year to year, students should seek further information from the instructor before registering regarding the particular topic that will be analyzed. Possible topics to be analyzed include: the ancient roots of terrorism, motivation of terrorists, the current vulnerability of modern democracies, and global jihad.

CJ 403. Domestic Violence Law. 3 Hours.

This course introduces domestic violence law from an interdisciplinary perspective and offers a contemporary view of the criminal justice experience with diverse populations and forms of violence. Topics will include violence perpetrated in a variety of age and gender relationships including: dating violence, sibling abuse, rape and incest, child and elder abuse and neglect, male battering, violence within the lesbian and gay communities, and violence against women. Students will also be expected to master current State of Maine and federal statutes relating to domestic violence. Prerequisite(s): PL 100 or CJ 101.

CJ 404. Cults. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce and explore the structure and psychology of totalistic cultic organizations. Students will examine the key differences between conventional religious movements, splinter sects and cults to better understand the differences among varied faith-based organizations. Cults will be viewed both from historical and contemporary viewpoints in regard to recruiting practices, thought reform and control, personal and social consequences of cult membership, and the unique challenges that such groups pose for law enforcement. Additionally, students will review the clinical precursors which may predispose an individual to cultic persuasion and indoctrination, as well as the psychological consequences of membership. The course will rely heavily upon a detailed case study format which will scrutinize selected cult leaders/groups and allow students to apply theoretical knowledge to particular historical events and figures. Prerequisite(s): PY 332 or PY 232.

CJ 405. Crime & Literature. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce several works of classical and modern literature which have incorporated the use of crime or criminality as a central theme. Students will be required to read from works of short fiction and novels as a means of preparing for discussion and analysis of core elements. Additionally, the various experiences of the individual criminal will be considered in light of those factors which may have an impact on the development of crime as a situational or social phenomenon. Required sources may include, but not remain limited to: Ernest Hemingway, Arthur Miller, William Faulkner and Truman Capote. Prerequisite(s): EH 200.

CJ 406. Victimology. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the forgotten member of the criminal dyad: the victim. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to these developments and to alert them to ongoing victim-related issues. The goals of the course will include: Introducing the student to the development of the field of victimology; Delineating the conceptual boundaries of victimology; Familiarizing the student with basic concepts and literature within various sub-areas of victimology; Exploring policy developments and practical applications that stem from this concern over victims; and Assessing the progress away from a criminal justice system towards achieving a victim justice system. Prerequisite(s): CJ 235.

CJ 407. Advanced Community Policing. 3 Hours.

In this practicum based course, students will establish partnerships with relevant community members to identify problems related to the incidence of crime and social disorder. Students will engage in a collaborative problem solving exercise which will illustrate the enhanced ability of communities to prevent crime and disorder through cooperative and reciprocal relationships between police and citizens. Prerequisite(s): CJ 307.

CJ 408. Serial Homicide. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce and explore the phenomenon of repetitive, intrinsically motivated homicide utilizing both clinical and law enforcement perspectives. Primary behavioral and crime scene characteristics of both organized and disorganized types of offenders will be reviewed to explain the incidence of serial homicide as a function of motivational factors ranging from sociopathy to severe psychiatric disturbance. The varied typologies and classification systems for serial murderers will be presented as a means of discussing issues ranging from victim selection to law enforcement investigative responsibilities. The course will rely heavily upon a detailed case study format which will scrutinize the crimes of key selected offenders and allow students to apply theoretical knowledge to particular serial perpetrators. Prerequisite(s): PY 332 or PY 232.

CJ 409. Criminal Profiling. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce and review the basic theoretical and practical applications of criminal profiling techniques. Specifically, the student will be introduced to concepts including, but not limited to: the uses of criminal profiling; crime scene evaluation and reconstruction; criminal motivation and offender characteristics; modus operandi and offender signature; psychopathic and sadistic behavior; behavioral aspects of fire-setting; serial offenses, including rape and homicide. Students will explore varied offense behaviors and their psychological underpinnings to develop an understanding of the role of behavioral analysis of evidence in critical investigations. Prerequisite(s): PY 332 or PY 232.

CJ 410. Criminal Justice Internship. 3-9 Hours.

In this experiential course, the student serves as an intern with a criminal justice professional in a work setting. This placement may be in the public or private sector and is governed by an agreement signed by the student, the professional, and the internship director. The experience may be multidisciplinary, but should have a strong criminal justice element. Students are expected to be sufficiently motivated to seek out their own placement site with some guidance from the internship director. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Junior or College Level=Senior.

CJ 412. Homeland Security. 3 Hours.

This course of study relates principle aspects of terrorism and how it affects our communities. This course compiles information from programs available on the national level that pertain to terrorism and the law enforcement officer’s response to these types of incidents. The instruction is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the key role of first responder in their response to a suspected terrorist incident.

CJ 414. Counterterrorism and Counterinsurgency. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the topics of counterterrorism and counterinsurgency. A variety of concepts, theories, and methodologies will be examined in an effort to better understand what drives violent jihadism and global terrorism. Students will learn about policies, strategies, and tactics designed to counter the global threats currently posed during the terror age, and the operational and political risks of government action or inaction.

CJ 415. Corporate Security. 3 Hours.

Security has entered a new era since the events of 9/11 and this course focuses on the impact of these events on Corporate Security. Risk assessment models and proactive strategic planning concepts will be discussed drawing from actual cases. Students will also learn the importance of working from measurable metrics and business needs rather than unproven assumptions.

CJ 416. Global Jihad and Radicalization. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the rise of radical Islam beginning in the late 20th century with the Mujahideen in Afghanistan and the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, through the 21st century with the emergence of Al Qaeda, Taliban, Boka Haram and ISIS. The course will examine methods, practices and global ambitions of these groups. Additionally attention will be given to the global ambitions for the creation of an Islamic caliphate and its implications for the modern world. The process and dynamics of Islamic fundamentalist radicalization will be explored in terms of how and where it occurs and how it can be prevented. Extensive use will be made of multimedia images of historical and current events.

CJ 420. Leadership in Police Organizations I. 3 Hours.

This course awards academic credit for participation in the International Association of Chiefs of Police Leadership in Police Organizations Program (LPO). The program is a leadership training program based on the principles of dispersed leadership in a policing environment.

CJ 421. Leadership in Police Organizations II. 3 Hours.

This course awards academic credit for participation in the International Association of Chiefs of Police Leadership in Police Organizations Program (LPO). The program is a leadership training program based on the principles of dispersed leadership in a policing environment.

CJ 435. Management & Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

This course examines the application of modern management theory and technique to the criminal justice system. It emphasizes the unique nature of the criminal justice community and the complex relationships, which are necessary to make it efficient and effective. Topics covered include: hiring, developing personnel; managing budgets, dealing with public sector unions; discipline and problem behaviors; complaints and grievances; stress and time management; performance appraisals; deploying human resources; and emerging trends in criminal justice management. Prerequisite(s): CJ 215.

CJ 445. Criminal Justice Capstone. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to synthesize the information and insights from other courses in the Criminal Justice Curriculum. It includes research in crime trends and causes, scholarly research, and an assessment of each student’s knowledge and understanding of the essential elements of the criminal justice system. This Capstone Course will focus on pragmatic application of principles and theories which guide Criminal Justice practice in the United States. Prerequisite(s): CJ 225 and PL 200.

CJ 490. Forensic Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce and review the basic theoretical and practical applications of forensic Psychology in our society. The student will be introduced to concepts in the field that directly impact or influence law enforcement and the judicial system. Concepts will range from the uses of criminal profiling, risk assessment of violent behavior and interrogation to custody, competency and discrimination determinations. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of each core topic as well as an appreciation for how each contributes to the broader domain of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite(s): (PY 332 or PY 232) and ( College Level=Junior or College Level=Senior).

CJ 491. Forensic Science I. 4 Hours.

This course builds on the scientific knowledge and analytical skills developed in the prerequisite science courses and laboratory work. The student will apply scientific principles and use current laboratory instrumentation to compare and distinguish between typical forensic evidence items. Students will become familiar with microscope examinations of trace evidence including soil, fibers and hairs, forensic serology and screening, DNA typing, bloodstain pattern analysis and toxicology. Topical discussions and lectures will be supplemented by scheduled field trips and guest speakers from the forensic science community. Prerequisite(s): SC 191 and SC 192 and SL 191 and SL 192 and SC 241 and CJ 221 and CJ 330 and SC 224.

CJ 492. Forensic Science II. 4 Hours.

This course builds on the scientific knowledge and analytical skills developed in the prerequisite science courses, laboratory work and Forensic Science I course. The student will build on their understanding of the properties of organic and inorganic compounds and apply these to analysis of typical forensic science samples. Students will analyze drugs, inks and dyes, explosives, fire debris samples. Forensic document examination, fingerprint development and bullet comparisons will be conducted. Scientific reports will be written for each specific forensic discipline. Topical discussions and lectures will be supplemented by scheduled field trips and guest speakers from the forensic science community. Prerequisite(s): CJ 491.

CJ 493. Forensic Seminar. 4 Hours.

This course is the capstone of the bachelor’s degree in forensic science. The course will draw on the knowledge acquired throughout the previous seven semesters. The course will guide students through correct processing and sequencing of processing of evidence at the crime scene and in the laboratory. Particular attention will be placed on understanding the pros and cons, false negatives and false positives, cross reactions and potential for cross contamination in analyzing and testing evidence items. Students will learn various techniques for describing scientific principles in layman’s terms. The course will finish up with a mock trial at the end of the semester, giving the student the chance to experience direct and cross examination. During the course of the semester the class will sit for the International Association of Identification (IAI) crime scene technician certification. This will give the students the opportunity to acquire international certification and well as earn the degree. Prerequisite(s): SC 103 and SL 103 and SC 241 and SL 241 and CJ 221 and CJ 330 and SC 224 and CJ 491.

CJ 496. Concepts and Issues in CJ. 3 Hours.

This course provides a broad overview and critical examination of criminal justice topics. Commentary on these issues is written by experts in fields such as crime and justice and America, American law enforcement, the court system, juvenile justice, corrections, and the future of justice in America. Students will be required to meet nineteen course objectives and will be expected to read and comprehend a series of essays and subsequently research current events related to the CJ topics. An additional requirement will be student-led class discussion on an assigned topic area over the course of the semester. Prerequisite(s): ( College Level=Junior or College Level=Senior) and ( Major=BS Criminal Justice or Major=BS Psychology - Crim Justice).

CJ 498. Basic Law Enforcement Training. 15 Hours.

Taught at the Maine Criminal Justice Academy, this 18-week course is designed to qualify a student as a Maine law enforcement officer. The Academy program tests a student’s ability and willingness to assume the complex and challenging responsibilities of a modern law enforcement officer in keeping the peace, protecting state and federal constitutional rights and enforcing the law.

CJ 499. Topic/. 1-6 Hour.

This course is intended to provide the opportunity to offer advanced courses in criminal justice that would not normally be a part of the Husson curriculum. As such the topics will depend of the interests of students and faculty. Prerequisite(s): ( College Level=Junior or College Level=Senior).

CJ 700. Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration. 3 Hours.

This course provides an analysis and overview of the theories of organization and the administration of criminal justice agencies, including management styles, techniques of leadership, ethics, and decision-making for those students who do not have a previous background in criminal justice.

CJ 701. Justice Administration and Information Systems. 3 Hours.

This course will include the examination of contemporary law enforcement organizations and the issues police and other public service managers confront every day. The course will focus on case study analysis as a method of learning the latest management and behavioral theories. The five approaches to management that will be emphasized include: commitment to a common purpose; concern for high-quality public services; empowerment and shared leadership; pragmatic incrementalism; and dedication to public service.

CJ 702. Perspectives in Terrorism. 3 Hours.

The students in this course will analyze aspects of historical and current extremism and terrorism which will be related to contemporary domestic and international terrorism issues. The course will cover sophisticated theories developed by analysts around the world to investigate paramilitarism, white supremacy groups, hate groups, religious fundamentalism, and foreign terrorist groups which may pose a threat to United States interests. Among the topics to be analyzed include the ancient roots of terrorism, motivation of terrorists, the current vulnerability of modern democracies, and global jihad.

CJ 703. Labor and Employment Law. 3 Hours.

This course reviews the law under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). It will focus on unfair labor practices, union representative elections and conflict in the workplace. It includes an emphasis on proper collective bargaining processes, methods of mediation and arbitration to resolve disputes and the duty to bargain in good faith between employers and employees. Students are expected to study the text of the statute, relevant selections from actual cases, and various other materials and apply them to current events and hypothetical situations.

CJ 705. Leadership & Ethics. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with a study of leadership principles and strategies using historical figures as examples. The primary source of effective leadership will be Ernest Shackleton and is 1914 Antarctic expedition. Other historical leaders that will be drawn from include, but are not limited to: George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt. Students will focus on leadership decisions made by these individuals and the ethical framework that surrounds every decision. Students will incorporate the leadership and ethical decision making skills into a final project related to their own field of study.

CJ 707. Public Policy and Planning. 3 Hours.

Students will examine policy development and planning processes. Topics will include the process and models of policy formation, policy implementation methods and evaluation components typically associated with planned change in criminal justice.

CJ 709. Advanced Criminological Theories. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce an advanced sociological perspective as it is applied to the themes of crime, criminality and the individual offender. Specifically, definitions of selected crimes will be explored in conjunction with various perspectives on both causation and response to criminal acts. This analysis will require students to read and discuss the primary writings of those thinkers responsible for the development of landmark classical and contemporary criminological theories.

CJ 710. Criminal Justice Graduate Internship. 3-6 Hours.

This course is designed for students who desire to obtain on-the-job experience in the criminal justice profession who have not previously been employed in the internship locale. The nature of the work and the location of the internship must be approved by the student's advisor. Included in the experience and pre-counseling, on-site supervision, periodic summary and evaluation reporting, supplemental reading, pertinent research or practical work-related projects, and presentation of projects.

CJ 711. White Collar Crime. 3 Hours.

This course explores the nature of elite deviance as it relates to crime and power in American society. Various forms of white collar crime will be examined and illustrated through case studies and estimates of the extent and costs of these crimes will be presented. Students will have the opportunity to gain a better understanding of how white collar crime affects employees, consumer and citizens.

CJ 712. Homeland Security. 3 Hours.

This course relates principle aspects of terrorism and how it affects our communities. It compiles information from programs available on the national level that pertain to terrorism and the law enforcement officer’s response to these types of incidents. The instruction is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the key role of first responder in their response to a suspected terrorist incident.

CJ 713. Psychology and the Legal Environment. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce and review the basic theoretical and practical applications of forensic psychology in our society. Specifically, issues related to the use of psychological research and knowledge in legal environments will be presented to allow the student to appreciate the unique interaction between psychology and the law. Concepts will range from the analysis of competency and insanity to the use of criminal profiling, risk assessments of violent behavior, and psychopathology. Considerable attention will be allotted to an investigation of victimology concerns stemming from sexual assault of children and adults, as well as domestic violence. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of each core topic as well as an appreciation for how each contributes to the broader domain of the legal system.

CJ 714. Counterterrorism and Counterinsurgency. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the topics of counterterrorism and counterinsurgency. A variety of concepts, theories, and methodologies will be examined in an effort to better understand what drives violent jihadism and global terrorism. Students will learn about policies, strategies, and tactics designed to counter the global threats currently posed during the terror age, and the operational and political risks of government action or inaction.

CJ 715. Corporate Security. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the impacts on corporate security from the new age that has been entered since 9/11/01. Entirely new risk assessment models and proactive strategic planning concepts will be discussed drawing from actual cases. The important of working from measurable metrics and business needs rather than unproven assumptions will be discussed.

CJ 716. Global Jihad and Radicalization. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the issue of the rise of radical Islam beginning in the late 20th century with the Mujahedeen in Afghanistan and the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, through the 21st century with the emergence of Al Qaeda, Taliban, Boka Haram and ISIS. The course will examine methods, practices, and global ambitions of these groups. Additionally attention will be given to the global ambitions for the creation of an Islamic caliphate and its implications for the modern world. The process and dynamics of Islamic fundamentalist radicalization will be explored in terms of how and where it occurs and how it can be prevented. Extensive use will be made of multimedia images of historical and current events.

CJ 717. Graduate Capstone Course. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on providing students an understanding of the major theories of the public policymaking process, the mechanics of the process, methods of examining policy impacts, and how criminological research can affect policy change as well as be driven by policy. Another goal of this course is to familiarize students with current pressing criminal justice issues and to have the students become sophisticated practitioners and consumers of evaluation research. Students will be expected to reflect critically upon the role of criminological research in the policy making / decision making process. Prerequisite(s): BA 600 and 18 Credits From Range [BA 600 To BA 799].

CJ 720. Leadership in Police Organizations I. 3 Hours.

This course awards academic credit for participation in the International Association of Chiefs of Police Leadership in Police Organizations Program (LPO). The program is a leadership training program based on the principles of dispersed leadership in a policing environment.

CJ 721. Leadership in Police Organizations II. 3 Hours.

This course awards academic credit for participation in the International Association of Chiefs of Police Leadership in Police Organizations Program (LPO). The program is a leadership training program based on the principles of dispersed leadership in a policing environment.

CJ 799. Topic/. 3-6 Hours.

This is a course of variable content. Faculty and students prepare a special topic of timely interest in Criminal Justice Administration. This course may consist of seminars, individualized instruction, and/or research related to a specific area of specialization.