NU (NU)

Courses

NU 100. Professional Concepts in Nursing. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is on the past, present, and emerging roles of the nurse. The course covers the core concepts of baccalaureate nursing and the curriculum design and entails discussions aimed to enhance student success such as self-assessment and identification of learning styles. Students will also obtain a framework for their program of study and nursing practice by covering materials such as critical thinking, the nursing process, teaching and learning, the nursing metapardigm, ethics, and law. Students examine their own thinking processes to assist in personal and professional growth.

NU 208. Health Assessment. 4 Hours.

This course covers nursing assessment of the healthy adult. The student gathers subjective and objective data about a client’s health status and performs a systematic physical assessment. The clinical laboratory setting is utilized to practice the techniques of assessment and the identification of normal findings. Prerequisite(s): SC 221 and SL 221 and SC 222 and SL 222.

NU 211. Nursing Intervention I. 3 Hours.

This course introduces concepts of patient care and basic nursing interventions used in caring for individuals throughout the lifespan. Learners will use the classroom and skills laboratory to gain beginning competence in nursing theory, nursing process, basic nursing skills, therapeutic communication, and critical thinking. Students will also develop an awareness of diverse cultural beliefs and values in relation to health care. A major focus will be on the nurse’s role in the safe delivery of care. Prerequisite(s): SC 221 and SL 221 and SC 222 and SL 222 and SC 180 and SL 180 and NU 100 and (MS 141 or MS 180 or MS 181).

NU 212. Nursing Intervention II. 4 Hours.

In this course students apply demonstrate competencies with respect to nursing interventions utilized throughout the life span. Students also enhance cognitive, psychomotor, affective, personal, and professional development. Skills learned in this course are applied clinically throughout the remainder of the curriculum. Students also demonstrate an awareness of diverse cultural beliefs and values in relation to the healthcare of others. Prerequisite(s): NU 211 and (SC 221 and SL 221) and (SC 222 and SL 222) and (SC 180 and SL 180) and NU 100.

NU 214. Pharmacology. 3 Hours.

This course builds upon students’ knowledge of anatomy, physiology, chemistry and the nursing process. It is designed to provide the knowledge required for the safe administration of drugs and teaching with patients across the life span. Actions, therapeutic uses, interactions and side effects of major drug classifications, as well as nursing responsibilities related to drug administration to patients across the life span are examined. Prerequisite(s): NU 211.

NU 299. Topic/. 1 Hour.

Selected topics in nursing are considered. The course enhances students’ knowledge of professional nursing, building upon previous knowledge of the nursing and research processes. Emphasis is placed on increasing awareness of current professional issues in nursing.

NU 315. Child Health. 5 Hours.

This course is predicated upon previous course work in social and natural sciences, humanities and nursing. It is designed to address issues related to health and illness experienced by children and their families in varying developmental stages. Students apply the nursing process, adaptation and family theories as a framework to assess, plan, implement and evaluate nursing strategies used to maintain health and to resolve illness related issues. Additionally, students integrate research findings to provide nursing care based on evidence. Prerequisite(s): NU 208 and NU 211 and NU 212 and NU 214 and SC 233 and SC 234.

NU 320. Nursing Research. 3 Hours.

Students will understand the basic concepts, processes, and applications of quantitative and qualitative research. Students will analyze the role and implication of nursing research and research within other disciplines on the nursing profession. Prerequisite(s): MS 132.

NU 322. Adult/Family Health I. 5 Hours.

This course facilitates the integration of knowledge and skills acquired from previous courses. The emphasis is on understanding the nurse’s role in uncomplicated acute and chronic illness with predictable outcomes within changing practice environments across the spectrum of health and illness. In a learner-centered classroom and simulation environment, analytical and experiential learning activities are provided which encourage active participation in demonstrating clinical reasoning and judgment in meeting the health care needs of clients/family. The goal is for the learner to be able to approach client care conceptually, so that care is designed with a focus on prioritization and solid understanding of rationales. Prerequisite(s): NU 208 and NU 211 and NU 212 and NU 214 and SC 333 and SC 234.

NU 323. Adult/Family Health II. 5 Hours.

This course facilitates students’ integration of knowledge gained from previous courses, and expands students’ knowledge from previous learning experiences. Theoretical and conceptual models and related research provide the foundation for expanding health assessment and clinical practice skills. Analytical and experiential learning activities are provided which encourage active participation in demonstrating decision-making skills and judgment in meeting the health care needs of clients/family. Prerequisite(s): NU 208 and NU 211 and NU 212 and NU 214 and SC 233 and SC 234 and NU 322.

NU 324. Maternal and Newborn Nursing. 5 Hours.

The focus of this course is the childbearing family. Concepts related to prepregnancy issues, pregnancy, the fetus/newborn, and the post delivery family are presented. Physiologic, social, and cultural issues, as they relate to the childbearing family, are included. Clinical experiences occur in a variety of settings, including inpatient, educational, and community settings. Prerequisite(s): SC 233 and SC 234 and SC 241 and NU 208 and NU 211 and NU 212 and NU 214.

NU 412. Community Health. 5 Hours.

This course builds upon the student’s broad base of knowledge in the natural and social sciences, humanities, and previous nursing content. Attention is directed toward assessment of biopsychosocial stressors of the individual, family, group, and community and their adaptation to changes in the environment. Prerequisite(s): NU 322 and NU 323 and NU 324 and NU 320 and NU 315.

NU 422. Community Mental Health. 5 Hours.

This course focuses on behaviors, which occur when individuals, families, and groups in the community are unable to cope effectively with acute and chronic biopsychosocial and cultural stressors. Relevant theories and theoretical formulations are used in order to promote an understanding of individual, family, group, and community dynamics. Within the framework of the nursing process, self-knowledge and intervention skills are developed which allow the student to assist individuals, families, and groups in their adaptation to internal and external stressors. Prerequisite(s): NU 320 and NU 322 and NU 323 and NU 324 and NU 315.

NU 424. Adult / Family Health III. 3 Hours.

This course is the last of the adult health sequence. It is designed to integrate and expand previous learning, clinical and leadership experiences of the student. Students participate in scenarios that require them to critically analyze and apply research, theories and educational models of teaching/learning processes. Prerequisite(s): NU 322 and NU 323.

NU 425. Nursing Senior Capstone. 1 Hour.

This weekly seminar capstone class is for students graduating at the end of the semester. Students engage in an online HESI NCLEX review course. The seminar portion of the class affords students an opportunity to review information, discuss questions and challenges, and enhance their ability to successfully complete the NCLEX exam. Prerequisite(s): NU 315 and NU 320 and NU 322 and NU 324.

NU 426. Policy Leadership and Management in Nursing. 4 Hours.

This course provides a conceptual and practical basis for examining professional nursing leadership roles. Emphasis is placed on accountability in regulated systems, management of complex organizations, and principles of advocacy aimed at the promotion of health and quality health systems. Prerequisite(s): College Level=Senior.

NU 431. Wound Management. 3 Hours.

Focus is on utilization of the Nursing Process in the provision of care to clients with chronic wounds. Emphasis is placed on client/family education and the use of evidence-based practice in wound management. Prerequisite(s): NU 208 and NU 212.

NU 432. Caring, Spirituality & Culture. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the undergraduate nursing student with a working knowledge of how the concepts of caring, culture and spirituality influence health status and health related behaviors. The focus of the course is to explore these concepts, their meanings and implications, and to utilize the concepts when providing or planning holistic nursing care for diverse clients, families, groups, and communities.

NU 433. Gerontological Nursing. 3 Hours.

Course is to address the professional nursing role in providing and coordinating health care for the elderly population. Content provided is to address physical, emotional, social and spiritual needs of older adults. The nursing process will identify individual and family issues for professional nurse to serve as a conduit for skills and information to promote successful aging. Prerequisite(s): NU 208 and NU 212.

NU 435. History of Women’s Health. 3 Hours.

An elective course that explores the progression of the women’s health movement in the U.S. from the 1800’s to present day. Ideas about women’s bodies as an entity of wellness and illness in the context of medicine and the feminist movement will be discussed and researched in this seminar-type class. The student will gain an understanding of the struggles as well as the accomplishments of important historical figures and their concepts. Traditional women healers from lay to professional will be researched for an understanding of how women receive health care in 2008. Race, ethnicity, disability, sexuality and class will be examined looking at individual perspectives of health and care. Prerequisite(s): NU 208 and NU 212.

NU 441. Role Transition to Professional Nursing. 3 Hours.

This course examines the transition of the Registered Nurse (RN) to the professional role of pursing an advanced degree at the baccalaureate or graduate level. As the entry course for the Professional Component of the RN-to-BSN program, this immersive experience provides students with networking and mentoring opportunities with peers and faculty. Students also examine the nursing profession, historical foundations and current issues regarding the scope and roles of professional baccalaureate nursing practices. Critical thinking and interpersonal communication skills critical to professional practice are assessed through writing intensive assignments.

NU 442. Health Informatics & Technology. 3 Hours.

In this course, students explore the changing technology environment and its potential impact on the delivery of quality, safe patient care. The course combines knowledge of nursing, computers and health information in clinical decision-making and patient care outcomes. Overriding considerations will include: (a) technology’s impact on nursing work flow, (b) legal and ethical considerations associated with select technology, and (c) the impact of technology on the changing role of the nurse.

NU 443. Quality Improvement in Healthcare Systems. 3 Hours.

In this course, students are introduced to the competencies necessary, and nursing leadership’s responsibilities related to, continuous quality improvement, including data analysis, clinical practice guidelines, and future of healthcare. Students apply: (a) quality improvement assessment tools and models within a healthcare system, (b) continuous quality improvement theory, (c) evidence-based practice, (d) performance improvement methods, and (e) the development of team-based problem solving and resolution.

NU 444. BSN Capstone Practice (with 42 Practicum Hours). 3 Hours.

This is the culminating scholarly experience in the RN-to-BSN program of study. Students will focus on synthesis and integration of complex concepts relevant to their scope of practice, and leadership and management skills in complex organizational environments. Emphasis is placed on the application of leadership principles through an evidence-based capstone project. This course is offered in a hybrid format. Prerequisite(s): NU 441 and NU 442 and NU 443 and NU 706 and NU 710 and NU 740.

NU 445. Evidence Based Practice for the Professional Nurse. 3 Hours.

In this course, students address the role of research and evidence based practice in professional nursing practice. Theories, concepts and research methodologies are analyzed using case studies. Students identify and begin a scholarly capstone project. Emphasis is placed on inquiry as a tool to advance nursing knowledge and to promote evidence based practice for improved healthcare outcomes. This course has writing intensive assignments that require the student to write, critique, revise, critique, final revision. Prerequisite(s): NU 441.

NU 446. Practice Science and Skills for the Professional Nurse. 3 Hours.

In this course, students integrate science and skills in pathophysiology, pharmacology, and nursing assessment address physiological adaptations, health promotion and disease prevention across the lifespan. The course helps the practicing nurse advance professional practice skills and develop increased ability in problem solving and clinical reasoning. Prerequisite(s): NU 441.

NU 447. Leadership Development for the Professional Nurse. 3 Hours.

This course assists students to create a vision for themselves as leaders in healthcare. Course content focuses on the evaluation of theory models and concepts with emphasis on leadership and transformation for application in healthcare. Students will address concepts related to administrative and leadership roles and competencies for care delivery in complex and rapidly changing health care environments. Prerequisite(s): NU 441.

NU 448. Interprof. Collaboration in Rural Pub. Hlth. for the Prof NU. 4 Hours.

This course introduces the concepts of interprofessional and intraprofessional education into the study of community and rural public health. Students are provided experiential learning opportunities with a focus on community and rural public health and health disparities locally, regionally, and nationally. Prerequisite(s): NU 441.

NU 449. Health Policy Issues and Challenges for the Prof. Nurse. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the U.S. health care system, its components, and the policy challenges created by organizations and their impact on public health and the health care system. The use of sociopolitical and ethical frameworks are employed to define researchable policy questions, critically analyze policy issues and problems, articulate relevant policy options and bring research skills and data to help frame decision-making.

NU 455. Gerontological Nursing for the Professional Nurse. 3 Hours.

The course affords the practicing nurse an opportunity to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes that will help in providing and coordinating health care for the older adult population. Content addresses the physical, emotional, psychosocial, and spiritual needs of the older adult. Using the nursing process, the focus on individual and caregiver issues are developed into nursing skills to promote healthy aging practice and policy. Students engage in experiential learning in this course.

NU 495. Capstone for the Professional Nurse. 4 Hours.

This is the culminating scholarly experience in the RN-to-BSN program of study. Students synthesize and integrate complex concepts relevant to their scope of practice, leadership, and management skills in organizational environments. Emphasis is placed on the application of leadership principles through an evidence-based capstone project.

NU 499. Topic/. 1-3 Hour.

Selected topics in nursing are considered. The course enhances students’ knowledge of professional nursing, building upon previous knowledge of the nursing and research processes. Emphasis is placed on increasing awareness of current professional issues in nursing.

NU 700. Theories and Roles for Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide an opportunity to analyze theoretical concepts, principles and processes from nursing and related disciplines to guide advanced clinical practice and role development. The importance of the role of the Advanced Practice Nurse in Interprofessional Collaboration is also explored. Emphasis is placed on the relevant historic, current and future practice issues inherent in the varied aspects of advanced practice nursing. The course also examines legislative issues and trends at both state and national levels, as they relate to the effective and appropriate role of advanced practice nurses within our rapidly changing healthcare system.

NU 701. Theories for Advanced Nursing Practice. 2 Hours.

This course provides an opportunity to analyze theoretical concepts, principles and processes from nursing and related disciplines to guide advanced clinical practice and role development. These theories reflect important contributions from both the nursing profession and non-nursing disciplines. The course provides a historical perspective and analysis of nursing theorists from Nightingale to emerging theorists and includes an introduction to theories fundamental to advanced practice nursing, such as role theory and family nursing theory.

NU 702. Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics. 3 Hours.

This course builds upon undergraduate understanding of pharmacological principles and agents by preparing students to evaluate and prescribe medications for common acute and chronic health problems seen in the primary care setting. Students will examine the regulatory aspects of drug administration and prescription from the perspective of advanced nursing practice. The focal point of the class will be the development of clinical decision-making skills essential to safe and effective pharmacologic intervention. Current concepts in pharmacologic therapies as part of the treatment of commonly encountered health problems will be stressed. The importance of collaboration between Advanced Practice Nurses and Pharmacy colleagues will be addressed, particularly in regard to patient safety and treatment efficacy. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 706.

NU 703. Roles for Advanced Nursing Practice. 2 Hours.

This course provides an in-depth analysis of the role of the advanced practice nurse. That knowledge is needed to conceptualize and identify with relevant historic, current and future practice issues inherent in the role. Both state and national legislation and trends are addressed, as they relate to the effective and appropriate use of advanced practice nurses within the rapidly changing healthcare system.

NU 704. Advanced Health Assessment. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is the assessment of total health status of adult patients. The course is designed to enable the student to develop diagnostic reasoning skills and to utilize a regional approach to physical examination. Instruction builds upon the health assessment skills of the experienced RN/BSN and includes a laboratory practicum that provides the student with opportunities to apply new knowledge and practice in the areas of physical examination. Students will perform complete physical exams on each other and standardized patients -- obtaining health histories, performing physical examinations and documenting findings. Along the way, students will learn more about the importance of providing high-quality care that is culturally competent, the process of developing a list of Differential Diagnoses and appropriate ordering of diagnostics. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 706.

NU 705. Advanced Psychopharmacology. 3 Hours.

This course reviews the application of pharmacotherapeutic principles to psychiatric disorders across the lifespan. Major class of medications include antidepressants, mood stabilizers, psychostimulants, antipsychotic medications, anxiolytics and off label use. Students review in detail the indications, contraindications, side effects and adverse reactions and drug interactions. In addition, the course addresses the use of herbal remedies, homeopathy and diet. The course places special emphasis on the applications of psychopharmacology to clinical case studies across the lifespan, including children, adolescents, adults, and geriatric populations. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 702 and NU 706 and NU 707.

NU 706. Advanced Pathophysiology. 3 Hours.

This course examines the reaction of the body to disease throughout the lifespan. Using a conceptual approach that is designed to integrate knowledge from basic and clinical sciences, it focuses on alterations in biological processes which affect the body’s dynamic equilibrium. Alterations at the cellular and organ level are presented and include genetic, metabolic, infectious, immunologic, degenerative, and neoplastic processes. Clinical problems will be developed and explored to facilitate the acquisition of critical thinking, problem-solving and evaluation skills needed by practitioners in the management of clients with chronic and acute health problems.

NU 707. Neurobiology. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the study of brain, mind and behavior and examines the neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, and biochemical foundations of cognition, mood, emotion, affect, and behavior and the interactions among them. It takes into consideration both internal and external influences across a person’s life span. Included is an overview of brain functioning and mechanisms of neurotransmission, genetics, the effects of other body systems such as the endocrine and immune systems, temperament, and the environment. Prerequisite(s): NU 706.

NU 710. Nursing Research. 3 Hours.

This course explores the principles and uses of the research process in Advanced Practice Nursing. The graduate nursing student will become an active participant in the research experience and be prepared to develop, write and present a research proposal. Content will focus on evidence-based practice, understanding the role of a nurse practitioner as researcher, and the development of a research proposal that will be the foundation and beginning process of their scholarly project. Students are strongly encouraged to develop a proposal that includes interprofessional collaboration. Prerequisite(s): NU 700.

NU 740. Public Health Policy Issues and Challenges. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the graduate student with an opportunity to explore and evaluate the political process, fiscal policies, and their impact on public health and the health care system. The use of sociopolitical and ethical frameworks are interwoven with policy development. Opportunities are provided for students to critique public policy and determine how the behavior of health professional’s impact governmental decisions and regulatory processes. Students will explore legislative processes, state/federal policies, and analyze current legislative and policy issues.

NU 799. Special Topics in Nursing. 1-3 Hour.

Selected topics in nursing are offered under the guidance of graduate faculty. The course enhances students knowledge of advanced practice nursing, building on previous knowledge of nursing and healthcare in today’s complex and rapidly changing healthcare system. This course may be used as an elective in the student’s program of study and may be taken more than once as long as different topics are taken.

NU 801. Adv Mntl Hlth Assment Across the Lifespan(168 Clinical Hrs). 5 Hours.

NU 801 is a hybrid course designed for the development of advanced mental health assessment skills. The processes of psychiatric history-taking, mental status examination, biological and neurological assessment for clients throughout the lifespan is addressed. Students are prepared to use the Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM) multiaxial system. During practicum experiences, students perform comprehensive mental health assessments, determine DSM diagnoses and participate in treatment care planning, including the possible need for medication and medication management for clients and alternative treatments. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 704 and NU 706 and NU 707.

NU 802. Family Health I -- Adult-Gero Health (168 Internship Hours). 6 Hours.

This course explores relevant practice issues in the health care of adults and families. Primary focus is on the assessment of acute and chronic health problems experienced by this population, as well as health promotion/disease prevention activities. The precepted internship experience gives students an opportunity to provide primary care to adults of any age. In the course, students further explore the interprofessional collaborative role in both the classroom and clinical setting. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 702 and NU 704.

NU 806. Family Health IV-Integrating Primary Care (168 Intern. Hrs.). 6 Hours.

This is the culminating internship course in the program. The focus is on synthesizing the knowledge and clinical management skills from previous courses in preparation for the transition from graduate student to novice nurse practitioner. The course emphasizes the importance of integrating patient care by collaborating with other healthcare providers particularly in regard to improving patient safety and health outcomes. Students take part in seminars that allow them to thoroughly explore both clinical and non-clinical issues frequently noted in primary care. At the same time, students become familiar with the newest clinical guidelines for disorders most commonly seen in primary care. Information is provided and discussed in four on-campus/virtual sessions, weekly Journal Club requirements and will culminate with the presentation of Capstone projects. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 702 and NU 704 and NU 706 and NU 710 and NU 730 and NU 802 and NU 807 and NU 808.

NU 807. Family Health II -- Pediatrics (168 Internship Hours). 6 Hours.

This course explores the theories and practice of health care for children, from infancy through adolescence, within a context of family health care. It focuses on health promotion and acute and chronic illness conditions experienced by childbearing and child-rearing families. This course also emphasizes health-illness issues experienced by members in this group in underserved rural and urban areas. The clinical practicum presents the advanced practice nursing student with experience in assessing, planning, and managing care for families in these age groups at a variety of clinical sites. Opportunities are available in both the classroom and clinical setting to further explore the roles inherent to the advanced practice nurse. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 702 and NU 704 and NU 706.

NU 808. Family Health III -- Women’s Health (168 Internship Hours). 6 Hours.

This course explores the theories and practice of healthcare for women within the context of the family. It also focuses on health promotion and acute or chronic illness that may be experienced particularly by childbearing families. The internship will present the family nurse practitioner student with precepted experiential learning in assessing, planning and managing women’s health from a primary care perspective. Particular emphasis will be placed on the importance of collaborating with other health care professionals in order to achieve patient safety and optimal health outcomes. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 702 and NU 704 and NU 706.

NU 809. Adv Women's Health Assessment II (w/168 Intern Hrs). 6 Hours.

Building on previous study in women’s health, students begin to critically examine and address concepts and research related to issues of women from adolescence to menopause. This course focuses on the advanced practice nursing knowledge necessary for the comprehensive assessment and health management of individuals and families during the childbearing years. Particular attention will be paid to the pre-, ante- and post-natal periods. Concepts include human sexuality, disease prevention, pregnancy/childbirth and urogynecological issues as well as the social and political determinants of health. Prerequisite(s): NU 808.

NU 810. Family Psychiatric Nursing I (210 Clinical Hours). 6 Hours.

This course focuses on the psychiatric nurse practitioner’s role in the delivery of mental health care for mentally ill individuals and families across the lifespan. Students examine the theories relevant to family therapy and individual psychotherapy, as well as psychopharmacological and alternative treatments. Practicum experiences focus on student application of family interventions and therapy as well as individual interventions and psychotherapy in acute and chronic care settings. Populations include children, adolescents, adults, and geriatric individuals. Prerequisite(s): NU 702 and NU 705 and NU 710 and NU 722.

NU 811. Women's Health Iss - A Public Health Approach to Care & Pol. 3 Hours.

Consistent with the emerging definitions of women’s health and women’s health practice, this course examines a full range of health issues unique to women. Women’s health specialization includes prevention, the societal and political determinants of health, patient education and reconceptualization of women’s relationships with health care providers. Health assessment and maintenance as well as disease identification and treatment will be presented on a wellness to illness continuum. Students develop a woman-centered holistic approach to care--the central concept in women’s health nursing practice.

NU 812. Family Psychiatric Nursing II (210 Clinical Hours). 6 Hours.

This course focuses on the psychiatric nurse practitioner’s role in the delivery of primary mental health care across the lifespan. The course emphasizes promoting optimum mental health, preventing mental illness, health maintenance, and preventing new occurrences of mental illness. Students examine theories relevant to group therapy interventions and consultation, as well as psychopharmacological and alternative treatments. The advanced practice nursing student will develop interventions and programs that reduce stressors and maximize mental health for individuals of all ages and communities. Prerequisite(s): NU 810.

NU 813. Advanced Women's Health Assessment III (w/168 Intern Hrs). 6 Hours.

Students in this course will examine the unique issues and needs of the peri- and post-menopausal woman. There will be significant focus on the issues of healthy aging, sexuality, urogynecologic and hormonal changes affecting women as they move beyond the childbearing years. Prerequisite(s): NU 808 and NU 809.

NU 814. Family Psychiatric Nursing III (210 Clinical Hours). 6 Hours.

In this course, the psychiatric nurse practitioner’s role is further developed as the learner integrates psychiatric theory and practice skills while intervening with the chronic mentally ill in rural settings. Emphasis is on integration of psychotherapeutic, pharmacological, alternative therapeutic approaches, including crisis intervention and case management. During the practicum experiences, students coordinate care and advocate for special populations of individuals, families, and groups across the lifespan. Prerequisite(s): NU 812.

NU 816. Psychiatric NP Internship/Practicum. 3 Hours.

Class - 1.5 Credits, Clinical - 9 Hours/Week (Total 126 Hours) This is an intensive clinical internship that prepares students to practice in the role of a psychiatric nurse practitioner. Building on biopsychosocial theories, the student will deliver comprehensive holistic primary mental health care to clients. Students will conduct comprehensive assessment, including diagnosis of and referral for physical health problems. Additionally, clinical experiences will include ordering and interpreting laboratory and diagnostic studies. Comprehensive medication management of psychiatric clients will include an in-depth knowledge of psychotropic medications, acceptable prescribing practices and monitoring for side effects and efficacy. Students will present case studies with decision-making trees during seminars to explore relevant clinical and non-clinical issues. Prerequisite(s): NU 702 and NU 704 and NU 706.

NU 818. Family Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Practicum. 2 Hours.

This is an intensive clinical internship that prepares students to practice in the role of a family psychiatric nurse practitioner. It will broaden the depth of content and practice that students have already assimilated in the areas of child and adolescent psychotherapy and psychopharmacology. Building on biopsychosocial theories, the student will deliver holistic primary mental health care to clients. Students will conduct comprehensive assessments, including diagnosis of and referral for physical health problems. Clinical experiences will be on therapeutic treatment modalities and interventions with children and adolescents, including therapy and psychopharmacology. Therapy content will cover a range of therapeutic interventions from analytical to behavioral, family, individual and group and long term to brief therapy. Psychopharmacological content will include ordering and interpreting laboratory and diagnostic studies, in-depth knowledge of psychotropic medications, acceptable prescribing practices, monitoring for side effects and efficacy, risk verses benefit and an understanding of normal growth and development and what constitutes psychopathology. Students will present case studies with decision-making trees during seminars to explore relevant clinical and nonclinical issues.

NU 830. Teaching Learning Theories & Strategies in Health Education. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the theoretical foundations and strategies of teaching and learning in health education. The graduate health student will explore the various learning theories and pedagogical frameworks that guide the selection of instructional and learning strategies essential for both faculty and students. Content will be delivered using a variety of methodologies – classroom, multi-media on-line and on-line blog-type discussion format. Course participants will identify the differences and similarities in the learning theories specific to basic procedures of learning, assumptions made about such learning, the role of the educator, various sources of motivation to learn, and methods by which the transfer of learning is accomplished. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 702 and NU 704 and NU 706 and NU 710 and NU 730 and NU 740.

NU 832. Curriculum Development in Nursing Education. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on curriculum development that reflects contemporary health care trends and prepares graduates to function effectively within the context of continuously evolving nursing, health care and educational systems. In this course the graduate nursing student will design a curriculum that reflects institutional philosophy and mission, current nursing and health care trends, and community and societal needs so as to prepare nurses for practice in a complex, dynamic, multicultural health care environment. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 702 and NU 704 and NU 706 and NU 710 and NU 730 and NU 740.

NU 834. Assessment and Evaluation in Nursing Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce learning evaluation concepts, including test and measurement, at the didactic, clinical, and programmatic levels. Course content will include strategies to assess and evaluate learning in the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains. Quality improvement, as well as legal and ethical considerations is explored within these concepts. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 702 and NU 704 and NU 706 and NU 740 and NU 710 and NU 730.

NU 836. Informatics and Technology in Health Education. 3 Hours.

The 3 credit course will explore the changing technology environment and its potential to impact on the delivery of quality, safe patient care. Infusing technology into educational programs is vital in preparing students to understand and meet the demands of caring for today’s patient populations. The course facilitates and enhances healthcare student’s knowledge, skills, and abilities to apply meaningful use of technology within their respective program of study. Focus will combine knowledge of healthcare professional, computers, social media, and health information in clinical decision-making and patient care outcomes. Overriding considerations will include: technology’s impact on health profession work flow, legal, ethical and security considerations associated with select technology, and the impact of technology on the changing roles in healthcare will be discussed as they apply to clinical and consumer information technologies.

NU 838. Internship/Clinical Practicum in Nursing Education. 2-4 Hours.

This is the capstone clinical course in the nurse educator track. It involves the synthesis, refinement, and application of nursing, education, and evaluation theory in a variety of educational settings and integrated seminars. The bi-weekly seminars are framed within the context of established nurse educator scope of practice (NLN, 2005) and competencies (Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing, 2002; NLN, 2005) and students apply these in a variety of diverse academic and clinical settings under expert preceptor guidance. Graduate nursing students will create and share comprehensive portfolios demonstrating their ability to plan, deliver, assess and refine effective professional education offerings in varied settings with diverse learners. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 704 and NU 706 and NU 710 and NU 730 and NU 740 and NU 830 and NU 832 and NU 834 and NU 836.

NU 840. Nurse Educator Capstone. 1-3 Hour.

This is the culminating scholarly experience in the master’s program. Graduate nursing students will demonstrate mastery of one particular subject area in their specialty track by developing a scholarly project including an evidence based review of that topic. The Department of Nursing relies upon the definition of scholarly work provided in the American Association of Colleges of Nursing’s Position Statement on Defining Scholarship for the Discipline of Nursing (1999). This states “scholarship in nursing can be defined as those activities that systematically advance the teaching, research, and practice of nursing through rigorous inquiry that 1) is significant to the profession, 2) is creative, 3) can be documented, 4) can be replicated or elaborated, and 5) can be peer-reviewed through various methods.” The course will allow students to develop such a project in close advisement with a faculty mentor, and present their scholarship through a formal presentation and submitted paper, as well as a manuscript for publication or professional poster presentation. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 702 and NU 704 and NU 706 and NU 710 and NU 730 and NU 740 and NU 830 and NU 832 and NU 834 and NU 836.

NU 841. Family and Community Nurse Practitioner Capstone. 1-3 Hour.

This course is the culminating scholarly requirement for those in the MSN/FNP track. Graduate nursing students work together, in groups of two to four, to demonstrate mastery of a particular subject area significant to interprofessional primary care practice. A final paper, poster and oral presentation are required; submission of a manuscript for publication is optional. This course is offered on a one credit per semester basis in three of the four final semesters of coursework, for a required total of three credits. Prerequisite(s): NU 700 and NU 710.

NU 842. Family Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Capstone. 1-3 Hour.

This is the culminating scholarly experience in the master's program. Through this experience, graduate nursing students demonstrate mastery of a particular subject area in their specialty track by developing a scholarly project, including an evidence-based review of that topic. The scholarly project is based on factors used by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's Position Statement on Defining Scholarship for the Discipline of Nursing (1999) that include significance to the profession, creativity, documentation, replication and peer review. The course allows students to develop such a project in close advisement with a faculty mentor(s) and to present that scholarship through a formal presentation, submitted paper, and a manuscript for publication or professional presentation. Prerequisite(s): NU 710.